slavishness


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slav·ish

 (slā′vĭsh)
adj.
1. Of or characteristic of a slave or slavery; servile: Her slavish devotion to her job ruled her life.
2. Showing no originality; blindly imitative: a slavish copy of the original.

slav′ish·ly adv.
slav′ish·ness n.
Translations

slavishness

[ˈsleɪvɪʃnɪs] Nservilismo m

slavishness

nsklavische Abhängigkeit; (= submissiveness)Unterwürfigkeit f; the slavishness with which she imitated himdie sklavische Art, in der sie ihn nachahmte
References in classic literature ?
We accept this amiable slavishness, and praise a woman for it: we call this pretty treachery truth.
Goldman, Berkman, and Valkenburgh were livid that "Communist gangsters," whose leadership (on whatever gradation of slavishness to Moscow) "used the lives of Sacco and Vanzetti in order to gain prestige and glory" and furthered their own movement and its ends.
we have reached a third phase in historiography 'one which transcends the Eurocentric traditional slavishness to the written word and accepts that historical truth may be gleaned from oral history'" Miles, 1993 as cited in Bangura, 2011, p.
I would like to propose that Achilles (or, from another angle, Homer) invents this visit from Athena, and in so doing we see that ressentiment, rather than being the crowning virtue of a Christian slave morality, or even exclusively the root of modern humanitarian love, transforms slavishness into virtuous submission in the oldest poem known to the Western world.
Those alternatives are despotism and slavishness, ruling others as though they were slaves or living like a slave by preferring pleasure and wealth to what is truly good.
It suggests viewing God in awe and wonder, not in belittling slavishness.
Tennyson, in an assertion about the sonic singularity of a language and its meter, the untranslatability of the sound-sense nexus, honorably discharges himself from a classical slavishness, and frees himself from imitation that is anyhow doomed to fail.
27) Furthermore, when this interval "no longer logically connects before and after, organizing it into narrative continuity and temporal chronology, film unlocks a new sense of time experienced as an open ended possibility, one that escapes from the slavishness of the movement-image, from its sequential actions, from the inexorable progression of plot lines.
But in her latest biography, the slavishness is excruciating.
Trubowitz shows Milton surprisingly connecting Jews with the Chinese, both groups sharing an idealized past, as well as a natural slavishness.
And then does his being a slave involve a practice of self-servitude, and a masking of that slavishness as divine other-worship?