slavocrat

slav·oc·ra·cy

 (slā-vŏk′rə-sē)
n. pl. slav·oc·ra·cies
A ruling group of slaveholders or advocates of slavery, as in the southern United States before 1865.

slav′o·crat′ (slā′və-krăt′) n.
slav′o·crat′ic adj.

slavocrat

(ˈsleɪvəˌkræt)
n
(Historical Terms) (in the US before the Civil War) a slaveholder, or an advocate of slavery
References in periodicals archive ?
The moral baseness and empirical (repugnance) of Jefferson's observation aside, it is well to note that insofar as Black people could not readily be found who could comprehend the investigations of Euclid, or who appeared to be dull in imagination, that essential faculty for all creativity in idea and action, the efficient cause of this (wretched) state of affairs (from the vantage point of an African) either was ignored or jettisoned by Jefferson the slavocrat (and most other slave owners).
Those born in Africa were classified according to the categories accepted and shaped by Cuban criollo elites as part of their slavocrat heritage: lucumi, congo, and carabali.
My evaluation of Lewis' project in The Isle of Devils reframes these ploys in ludic terms, interpreting Lewis as a paradoxical slavocrat playing a dissociative politics of identity, designed to exploit instabilities at the local colonial level, and even to imagine threats to systemic pedagogies of class, nation and empire.
Tracy, the imperious slavocrat, clings desperately to slavery, the economic foundation of his wealth and power.
Selected Writings of Henry Hughes Antebellum Southerner, Slavocrat, Sociologist.
And when the heavily defended slavocrat stronghold of Osawatomie falls to Brown's tiny militia we are reminded of young David routing the Philistines or--Brown's own preferred text--of Gideon and the few brave men of Gilead crushing the Midianite annies.
Because of the many crises facing the slavocrats and their unwillingness to marry across class and racial boundaries, their way of life was coming to an end.
cease indirect support for the "Mohammedan and Mormon slavocrats in
Aggressive slavocrats had flouted basic democratic freedoms within their own states, menaced freedom-lovers in neighboring states, and begun to corrupt the character of federal institutions that rested on state-law foundations.
But the slavocrats who controlled the Chamber of Deputies would not provide the means to enforce the order.
3) The majority of state constitutions in 1857 were themselves free soil; the actual lived tradition in antebellum America was of various federal free soil laws stretching uninterruptedly back to the Northwest Ordinance passed by the very first Congress; and slavocrats in the Deep South could hardly be reckoned a broadly inclusive movement given the massive political exclusions in the South--of slaves, of free blacks, and of antislavery whites.