sliding


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Related to sliding: Sliding friction, sliding scale, Sliding Window Protocol

slide

 (slīd)
v. slid (slĭd), slid·ing, slides
v.intr.
1.
a. To move over a surface while maintaining smooth continuous contact.
b. To participate in a sport that involves such movement: sliding for a medal in luge.
c. To lose a secure footing or positioning; slip: slid on the ice and fell.
d. To pass smoothly and quietly; glide: slid past the door without anyone noticing.
e. Baseball To drop down from a running into a lying or diving position when approaching a base so as to avoid being tagged out.
2. To be ignored or not dealt with; drop: Let the matter slide.
3.
a. To decrease: Prices slid in morning trading.
b. To become less favorable or less desirable: Economic conditions have begun to slide.
v.tr.
1. To cause to slide or slip: slid the glass down to the other end of the counter.
2. To place covertly or deftly: slid the stolen merchandise into his pocket.
n.
1. A sliding movement or action.
2.
a. A smooth, usually inclined surface or track for sliding: a water slide.
b. A playground apparatus for children to slide on, typically consisting of a smooth chute climbed onto by means of a ladder.
3. A part that operates by sliding, as the U-shaped section of tube on a trombone that is moved to change the pitch.
4. A period of decline or loss: "The semiconductor industry is heading for a cyclical slide" (New York Times).
5.
a. An image on a transparent base for projection on a screen.
b. One of a series of images projected digitally as part of a presentation.
c. A small glass plate for mounting specimens to be examined under a microscope.
6. A fall of a mass of rock, earth, or snow down a slope; an avalanche or landslide.
7. A backless shoe with an open toe.
8. Music
a. A slight portamento used in violin playing, passing quickly from one note to another.
b. An ornamentation consisting of two grace notes approaching the main note.
c. A small metal or glass tube worn over a finger or held in the hand, used in playing bottleneck-style guitar.
d. The bottleneck style of guitar playing.

[Middle English sliden, from Old English slīdan.]
Synonyms: slide, slip1, glide, coast, skid
These verbs mean to move smoothly and continuously, often over a slippery surface. Slide usually implies rapid easy movement without loss of contact with the surface: coal that slid down a chute to the cellar. Slip is most often applied to accidental sliding resulting in loss of balance or foothold: slipped on a patch of ice. Glide refers to smooth, free-flowing, seemingly effortless movement: "four snakes gliding up and down a hollow" (Ralph Waldo Emerson).
Coast applies especially to downward movement resulting from the effects of gravity or momentum: The driver let the truck coast down the incline. Skid implies an uncontrolled, often sideways sliding caused by a lack of traction: The bus skidded on wet pavement.

sliding

(ˈslaɪdɪŋ)
adj
1. rising or falling in accordance with given specifications: fees were charged as a sliding percentage of income.
2. regulated or moved by sliding
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.sliding - being a smooth continuous motion
slippery, slippy - causing or tending to cause things to slip or slide; "slippery sidewalks"; "a slippery bar of soap"; "the streets are still slippy from the rain"
Translations

sliding

[ˈslaɪdɪŋ] ADJ [part] → corredizo; [door, seat] → corredero
sliding rooftecho m corredizo, techo m de corredera
sliding scaleescala f móvil

sliding

[ˈslaɪdɪŋ] adj [door] → coulissant(e)
sliding roof → toit ouvrantsliding scale néchelle f mobile

sliding

adj partgleitend

sliding

:
sliding contact
n (Elec) → Schleifkontakt m
sliding door
nSchiebetür f
sliding roof
nSchiebedach nt
sliding scale
sliding seat
nverschiebbarer Sitz, Schiebesitz m; (in rowing boat) → Rollsitz m
sliding tackle
n (Ftbl) → Grätsche f

sliding

[ˈslaɪdɪŋ] adj (part, seat) → mobile; (door) → scorrevole
sliding roof (Aut) → capotte f inv

sliding

n. deslizamiento.

sliding

adj (hernia) deslizante; — scale (payment, insulin) escala móvil (honorarios, insulina)
References in classic literature ?
They looked toward it and their horror- stricken eyes saw the whole side of the mountain sliding down.
Toward morning I used to have pleasant dreams: sometimes Tony and I were out in the country, sliding down straw-stacks as we used to do; climbing up the yellow mountains over and over, and slipping down the smooth sides into soft piles of chaff.
As he thundered out this he made a rush at Bildad, but with a marvellous oblique, sliding celerity, Bildad for that time eluded him.
Nor is it to be doubted that as such a procedure can do no harm, it may possibly be of no contemptible advantage; considering that oil and water are hostile; that oil is a sliding thing, and that the object in view is to make the boat slide bravely.
He sat up and stretched his arms, and then gazed at the water sliding by.
It was a wild, forsaken road, now winding through dreary pine barrens, where the wind whispered mournfully, and now over log causeways, through long cypress swamps, the doleful trees rising out of the slimy, spongy ground, hung with long wreaths of funeral black moss, while ever and anon the loathsome form of the mocassin snake might be seen sliding among broken stumps and shattered branches that lay here and there, rotting in the water.
But it was very simple; the train came sliding down, and when it reached the right spot it just stopped--that was all there was "to it"--stopped on the steep incline, and when the exchange of passengers and baggage had been made, it moved off and went sliding down again.
About this time I mighty near stepped on a good-sized snake, and it went sliding off through the grass and flowers, and I after it, trying to get a shot at it.
Dead people might talk, maybe, but they don't come sliding around in a shroud, when you ain't noticing, and peep over your shoulder all of a sudden and grit their teeth, the way a ghost does.