slighting


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

slight·ing

 (slī′tĭng)
adj.
Conveying or constituting a slight; belittling: a slighting look.

slight′ing·ly adv.

slighting

(ˈslaɪtɪŋ)
adj
characteristic of a slight; disparaging; disdainful: in a slighting manner.
ˈslightingly adv

slight•ing

(ˈslaɪ tɪŋ)

adj.
derogatory and disparaging; belittling.
[1605–15]
slight′ing•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.slighting - tending to diminish or disparage; "belittling comments"; "managed a deprecating smile at the compliment"; "deprecatory remarks about the book"; "a slighting remark"
uncomplimentary - tending to (or intended to) detract or disparage

slighting

slighting

adjective
Translations
مُزْدَرٍ، مُسْتَخِف، مُهين
urážlivý
lítilsvirîandi
hor görücüküçümseyici

slighting

[ˈslaɪtɪŋ] ADJdespreciativo, menospreciativo

slighting

adj (= offensive)kränkend; (= disparaging) behaviourgeringschätzig; remarkabschätzig, abfällig

slighting

[ˈslaɪtɪŋ] adjoffensivo/a

slight

(slait) adjective
1. small; not great; not serious or severe. a slight breeze; We have a slight problem.
2. (of a person) slim and delicate-looking. It seemed too heavy a load for such a slight woman.
ˈslightest adjective
(often in negative sentences, questions etc) least possible; any at all. I haven't the slightest idea where he is; The slightest difficulty seems to upset her.
ˈslighting adjective
insulting; disrespectful. He made rather a slighting remark about her parents.
ˈslightingly adverb
ˈslightly adverb
1. to a small extent. I'm still slightly worried about it.
2. slenderly. slightly built.
in the slightest
(in negative sentences, questions etc) at all. You haven't upset me in the slightest; That doesn't worry me in the slightest.
References in classic literature ?
And very handsome ones they are, too," cried Jo, who resented any slighting remarks about her friend.
I am sure nobody ought to be, or can be, a greater advocate for matrimony than I am; and if it had not been for the misery of her leaving Hartfield, I should never have thought of Miss Taylor but as the most fortunate woman in the world; and as to slighting Mr.
In hastily forming and giving his opinion of other people, in sacrificing general politeness to the enjoyment of undivided attention where his heart was engaged, and in slighting too easily the forms of worldly propriety, he displayed a want of caution which Elinor could not approve, in spite of all that he and Marianne could say in its support.