slip away


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slip 1

 (slĭp)
v. slipped, slip·ping, slips
v.intr.
1.
a. To move smoothly, easily, and quietly: slipped into bed.
b. To move stealthily; steal: slipped out the back door.
2.
a. To escape, as from a grasp, fastening, or restraint: slipped out of the wrestler's hold.
b. To put on or remove a piece of clothing smoothly or quietly: slipped into a nightgown; slipped out of the shirt.
3.
a. To slide involuntarily and lose one's balance or foothold. See Synonyms at slide.
b. To move accidentally out of place or fail to gain traction: The gear slipped.
4.
a. To pass gradually, easily, or imperceptibly into a different state: He slipped into a coma.
b. To decline from a former or standard level; fall off: The senator's popularity has slipped.
c. To elapse, especially quickly or without notice: The days slipped by.
5. To fall into fault or error. Often used with up.
v.tr.
1.
a. To place or insert smoothly and quietly: She slipped the letter into her pocket.
b. To insert (a remark, for example) unobtrusively: managed to slip his criticisms in before the end of the meeting.
2. To put on or remove (clothing) easily or quickly: slip on a sweater; slipped off her shoes.
3.
a. To get loose or free from; elude: slipped his pursuers.
b. To fail to be remembered by: Her name slips my memory.
4.
a. To release, loose, or unfasten: slip a knot.
b. To unleash or free (a dog or hawk) to pursue game.
5. To give birth to prematurely. Used of animals.
6. To dislocate (a bone).
7. To pass (a knitting stitch) from one needle to another without knitting it.
n.
1. The act or an instance of slipping or sliding.
2. An accident or mishap, especially resulting in a fall.
3.
a. An error in conduct or thinking; a mistake.
b. A slight error or oversight, as in speech or writing: a slip of the tongue.
4. Nautical
a. A docking place for a ship between two piers.
b. A slipway.
5. Nautical The difference between a vessel's actual speed through water and the speed at which the vessel would move if the screw were propelling against a solid.
6.
a. A woman's undergarment of dress length with shoulder straps.
b. A half-slip.
7. A pillowcase.
8. Geology
a. A smooth crack at which rock strata have moved on each other.
b. A small fault.
c. The relative displacement of formerly adjacent points on opposite sides of a fault.
9. The difference between optimal and actual output in a mechanical device.
10. Movement between two parts where none should exist, as between a pulley and a belt.
11. A sideways movement of an airplane when banked too far.
Phrasal Verb:
slip away
1. To depart without being noticed: We slipped away before the presentation was over.
2. To die gradually or peacefully.
3. To disappear or become unavailable: Don't let the opportunity slip away.
Idioms:
give (someone) the slip Slang
To escape the pursuit of.
let slip
To say inadvertently.
slip one over on Informal
To hoodwink; trick.

[Middle English slippen, probably of Middle Low German or Middle Dutch origin; see lei- in Indo-European roots.]

slip 2

 (slĭp)
n.
1. A part of a plant cut or broken off for grafting or planting; a scion or cutting.
2. A long narrow piece; a strip.
3. A slender youthful person: a slip of a child.
4. A small piece of paper, especially a small form, document, or receipt: a deposit slip.
5. A narrow pew in a church.
tr.v. slipped, slip·ping, slips
To make a slip from (a plant or plant part).

[Probably from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch slippe.]

slip 3

 (slĭp)
n.
Thinned potter's clay used for decorating or coating ceramics.

[Middle English, slime, from Old English slypa; see sleubh- in Indo-European roots.]

SLIP

 (slĭp)
abbr.
Serial Line Internet Protocol
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.slip away - leave furtively and stealthily; "The lecture was boring and many students slipped out when the instructor turned towards the blackboard"
go forth, leave, go away - go away from a place; "At what time does your train leave?"; "She didn't leave until midnight"; "The ship leaves at midnight"
2.slip away - pass by; "three years elapsed"
advance, march on, move on, progress, pass on, go on - move forward, also in the metaphorical sense; "Time marches on"
fell, vanish, fly - pass away rapidly; "Time flies like an arrow"; "Time fleeing beneath him"

slip

verb
1. To move smoothly, continuously, and effortlessly:
2. To move silently and furtively:
Slang: gumshoe.
3. To lose one's balance and fall or almost fall:
Idiom: take a skid.
4. To shift or be shifted out of place:
5. To maneuver gently and slowly into place:
6. To free from ties or fasteners:
7. To get away from (a pursuer):
Slang: shake.
Idiom: give someone the shake.
8. To bring forth a nonviable fetus prematurely:
9. To displace (a bone) from a socket or joint:
Idiom: throw out of joint.
10. To decline, as in value or quantity, very gradually:
11. To make an error or mistake:
12. To undergo moral deterioration:
Idiom: go bad.
phrasal verb
slip into
To put (an article of clothing) on one's person:
phrasal verb
slip on
To put (an article of clothing) on one's person:
phrasal verb
slip up
To make an error or mistake:
noun
1. An act or thought that unintentionally deviates from what is correct, right, or true:
2. A minor mistake:
Informal: fluff.
Translations

w>slip away

visich wegschleichen, sich wegstehlen; (time)verstreichen, vergehen; (chances)(allmählich) schwinden; (opportunity)dahinschwinden; her life was slipping away from herihr Leben schwand dahin
References in classic literature ?
Medlock and Martha gladly slipped away, and after everything was neat and calm and in order the nurse looked as if she would very gladly slip away also.
The old year did not slip away in a green twilight, with a pinky-yellow sunset.
Also, she was compelled to let her great colonies slip away from her.
The love she had renounced came back upon her with a cruel charm; she felt herself opening her arms to receive it once more; and then it seemed to slip away and fade and vanish, leaving only the dying sound of a deep, thrilling voice that said, "Gone, forever gone.
There's so little of her, I'm afraid to say much, for fear she will slip away altogether, though she is not so shy as she used to be," began their father cheerfully.
Very well, she would slip away now and see if she could stay all night with the Cobbs and be off next morning before breakfast.
If she let the precious minutes slip away, there might be another beating in store for her at the drain: her father was not of an indulgent disposition when his children were late in bringing his beer.
and with a hasty "Stay a minute just to please her, and then slip away, for I want her to sleep," the Doctor led him into the room.
With a sudden rush of warmer and more joyous feelings, he let the subject slip away from him.
said Kitty, trying assiduously to catch with her fork a perverse mushroom that would slip away, and setting the lace quivering over her white arm.
Lookee here, my sugar-stick,' said Mr Dennis, 'if your view's the same as mine, and you'll only be quiet and slip away at the right time, I can have the house clear to-morrow, and be out of this trouble.
He is to see that she does not slip away fired by a conviction, which suddenly overrides her pages, that the kitchen is going to rack and ruin for want of her, and she is to recall him to himself should he put his foot in the fire and keep it there, forgetful of all save his hero's eloquence.