slip off


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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.slip off - take off with ease or speed; "She slipped off her jacket"
take off - remove clothes; "take off your shirt--it's very hot in here"
slip on - put on with ease or speed; "slip into something more comfortable after work"; "slip on one's shoes"
Translations
يَخْلَعُ الملابِس بِسُرْعَهيمْشي بِسُرْعَه وبدون ضَجَّه
vysvlécivytratit sezout
liste afsmide
ledob
fara úrskjótast, laumast
çabucak çıkarmaksıvışmaktüymek

w>slip off

visich wegschleichen, sich wegstehlen
vt sep clothes, shoesausziehen, abstreifen

slip1

(slip) past tense, past participle slipped verb
1. to slide accidentally and lose one's balance or footing. I slipped and fell on the path.
2. to slide, or drop, out of the right position or out of control. The plate slipped out of my grasp.
3. to drop in standard. I'm sorry about my mistake – I must be slipping!
4. to move quietly especially without being noticed. She slipped out of the room.
5. to escape from. The dog had slipped its lead and disappeared.
6. to put or pass (something) with a quick, light movement. She slipped the letter back in its envelope.
noun
1. an act of slipping. Her sprained ankle was a result of a slip on the path.
2. a usually small mistake. Everyone makes the occasional slip.
3. a kind of undergarment worn under a dress; a petticoat.
4. (also ˈslipway) a sloping platform next to water used for building and launching ships.
ˈslipper noun
a loose, soft kind of shoe for wearing indoors.
ˈslippery adjective
1. so smooth as to cause slipping. The path is slippery – watch out!
2. not trustworthy. He's rather a slippery character.
ˈslipperiness noun
slip road
a road for joining or leaving a motorway.
ˈslipshod adjective
(of work etc) untidy; careless. The teacher told him his work was slipshod.
give (someone) the slip
to escape from or avoid (someone) in a secretive manner. The crooks gave the policemen the slip.
let slip
1. to miss (an opportunity etc). I let the chance slip, unfortunately.
2. to say (something) unintentionally. She let slip some remark about my daughter.
slip into
to put on (clothes) quickly. She slipped into her nightdress.
slip off
1. to take (clothes) off quickly. Slip off your shoe.
2. to move away noiselessly or hurriedly. We'll slip off when no-one's looking.
slip on
to put on (clothes) quickly.
slip up to make a mistake; to fail to do something: They certainly slipped up badly over the new appointment (noun ˈslip-up)
References in classic literature ?
Boys, you see, think a horse or pony is like a steam-engine or a thrashing-machine, and can go on as long and as fast as they please; they never think that a pony can get tired, or have any feelings; so as the one who was whipping me could not understand I just rose up on my hind legs and let him slip off behind -- that was all.
If a woman of my age and the mother of a family hasn't got sense enough not to slip off haymows, she'd ought to suffer.
It might be barely caught upon the very outer verge of the roof, so that as my body swung out at the end of the strap it would slip off and launch me to the pavement a thousand feet below.
I told him I must go, but he took no notice, so I thought the best thing I could do was to slip off.
This is the trappers' style of loading pack-horses; his men, however, were inexpert at adjusting the packs, which were prone to get loose and slip off, so that it was necessary to keep a rear-guard to assist in reloading.
You know the way, you slip off quietly and go to Kingston.
And he will slip off again if you irritate him, at this time of night, and will do himself some mischief.
He could forget the pain, he could slip off the burden; he would see clearly again, he would be master of his brain, of his thoughts, of his will.
I'll slip off and take a journey somewhere, and when Grandpa misses me he'll come round fast enough.
A woman's tongue is a deadly weapon and the most difficult thing in the world to keep in order, and things slip off it with a facility nothing short of appalling at the very moment when it ought to be most quiet.
The next thought that occurred to him was one that made him slip off his shoes and tread lightly upstairs, to listen at the bedroom doors.
So it happened that I was finishing my cigarette on the edge of the wet lawn, and about to slip off my shoes before stepping across the gravel to the conservatory door, when a most singular sound arrested me in the act.