slip off


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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.slip off - take off with ease or speed; "She slipped off her jacket"
take off - remove clothes; "take off your shirt--it's very hot in here"
slip on - put on with ease or speed; "slip into something more comfortable after work"; "slip on one's shoes"
Translations
يَخْلَعُ الملابِس بِسُرْعَهيمْشي بِسُرْعَه وبدون ضَجَّه
vysvlécivytratit sezout
liste afsmide
ledob
fara úrskjótast, laumast
çabucak çıkarmaksıvışmaktüymek

w>slip off

visich wegschleichen, sich wegstehlen
vt sep clothes, shoesausziehen, abstreifen

slip1

(slip) past tense, past participle slipped verb
1. to slide accidentally and lose one's balance or footing. I slipped and fell on the path.
2. to slide, or drop, out of the right position or out of control. The plate slipped out of my grasp.
3. to drop in standard. I'm sorry about my mistake – I must be slipping!
4. to move quietly especially without being noticed. She slipped out of the room.
5. to escape from. The dog had slipped its lead and disappeared.
6. to put or pass (something) with a quick, light movement. She slipped the letter back in its envelope.
noun
1. an act of slipping. Her sprained ankle was a result of a slip on the path.
2. a usually small mistake. Everyone makes the occasional slip.
3. a kind of undergarment worn under a dress; a petticoat.
4. (also ˈslipway) a sloping platform next to water used for building and launching ships.
ˈslipper noun
a loose, soft kind of shoe for wearing indoors.
ˈslippery adjective
1. so smooth as to cause slipping. The path is slippery – watch out!
2. not trustworthy. He's rather a slippery character.
ˈslipperiness noun
slip road
a road for joining or leaving a motorway.
ˈslipshod adjective
(of work etc) untidy; careless. The teacher told him his work was slipshod.
give (someone) the slip
to escape from or avoid (someone) in a secretive manner. The crooks gave the policemen the slip.
let slip
1. to miss (an opportunity etc). I let the chance slip, unfortunately.
2. to say (something) unintentionally. She let slip some remark about my daughter.
slip into
to put on (clothes) quickly. She slipped into her nightdress.
slip off
1. to take (clothes) off quickly. Slip off your shoe.
2. to move away noiselessly or hurriedly. We'll slip off when no-one's looking.
slip on
to put on (clothes) quickly.
slip up to make a mistake; to fail to do something: They certainly slipped up badly over the new appointment (noun ˈslip-up)
References in classic literature ?
And there's Jim chained by one leg, with a ten-foot chain, to the leg of his bed: why, all you got to do is to lift up the bedstead and slip off the chain.
Then, the night you're ready, fetch the leg a kick, down she goes; slip off your chain, and there you are.
Boys, you see, think a horse or pony is like a steam-engine or a thrashing-machine, and can go on as long and as fast as they please; they never think that a pony can get tired, or have any feelings; so as the one who was whipping me could not understand I just rose up on my hind legs and let him slip off behind -- that was all.
Goring is not nearly so pretty a little spot to stop at as Streatley, if you have your choice; but it is passing fair enough in its way, and is nearer the railway in case you want to slip off without paying your hotel bill.
If a woman of my age and the mother of a family hasn't got sense enough not to slip off haymows, she'd ought to suffer.
It might be barely caught upon the very outer verge of the roof, so that as my body swung out at the end of the strap it would slip off and launch me to the pavement a thousand feet below.
I told him I must go, but he took no notice, so I thought the best thing I could do was to slip off.
This is the trappers' style of loading pack-horses; his men, however, were inexpert at adjusting the packs, which were prone to get loose and slip off, so that it was necessary to keep a rear-guard to assist in reloading.
or she might just stuff her face with festive meals for the next few days to pack on the pounds so that the ring doesn't slip off again.
It was five down when Joe Clarke followed a ball from Craig Meschede but Ben Cox held up the Welsh charge for a while in making 16 until he was caught at first slip off Wagg after lunch.
AB de Villiers on 5: Dropped by Joe Root at second slip off James Anderson - the easiest chance Hashim Amla on 76: Dropped by Anderson at slip off Root - went quickly but quite catchable Amla on 120: Dropped by Nick Compton at backward point off Steven Finn - a diving effort to his left Faf du Plessis on 61: Dropped by Anderson at slip off Moeen Ali - hurried on to him and appeared to palm the ball away Amla on 201: Dropped by James Taylor off Stuart Broad - a tough, low chance at short leg Chris Morris on 22: Dropped by Finn off his own bowling - a sharp chance in his follow-through.