slipped


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Related to slipped: slipped disc, slipped epiphysis, slipped up

slip 1

 (slĭp)
v. slipped, slip·ping, slips
v.intr.
1.
a. To move smoothly, easily, and quietly: slipped into bed.
b. To move stealthily; steal: slipped out the back door.
2.
a. To escape, as from a grasp, fastening, or restraint: slipped out of the wrestler's hold.
b. To put on or remove a piece of clothing smoothly or quietly: slipped into a nightgown; slipped out of the shirt.
3.
a. To slide involuntarily and lose one's balance or foothold. See Synonyms at slide.
b. To move accidentally out of place or fail to gain traction: The gear slipped.
4.
a. To pass gradually, easily, or imperceptibly into a different state: He slipped into a coma.
b. To decline from a former or standard level; fall off: The senator's popularity has slipped.
c. To elapse, especially quickly or without notice: The days slipped by.
5. To fall into fault or error. Often used with up.
v.tr.
1.
a. To place or insert smoothly and quietly: She slipped the letter into her pocket.
b. To insert (a remark, for example) unobtrusively: managed to slip his criticisms in before the end of the meeting.
2. To put on or remove (clothing) easily or quickly: slip on a sweater; slipped off her shoes.
3.
a. To get loose or free from; elude: slipped his pursuers.
b. To fail to be remembered by: Her name slips my memory.
4.
a. To release, loose, or unfasten: slip a knot.
b. To unleash or free (a dog or hawk) to pursue game.
5. To give birth to prematurely. Used of animals.
6. To dislocate (a bone).
7. To pass (a knitting stitch) from one needle to another without knitting it.
n.
1. The act or an instance of slipping or sliding.
2. An accident or mishap, especially resulting in a fall.
3.
a. An error in conduct or thinking; a mistake.
b. A slight error or oversight, as in speech or writing: a slip of the tongue.
4. Nautical
a. A docking place for a ship between two piers.
b. A slipway.
5. Nautical The difference between a vessel's actual speed through water and the speed at which the vessel would move if the screw were propelling against a solid.
6.
a. A woman's undergarment of dress length with shoulder straps.
b. A half-slip.
7. A pillowcase.
8. Geology
a. A smooth crack at which rock strata have moved on each other.
b. A small fault.
c. The relative displacement of formerly adjacent points on opposite sides of a fault.
9. The difference between optimal and actual output in a mechanical device.
10. Movement between two parts where none should exist, as between a pulley and a belt.
11. A sideways movement of an airplane when banked too far.
Phrasal Verb:
slip away
1. To depart without being noticed: We slipped away before the presentation was over.
2. To die gradually or peacefully.
3. To disappear or become unavailable: Don't let the opportunity slip away.
Idioms:
give (someone) the slip Slang
To escape the pursuit of.
let slip
To say inadvertently.
slip one over on Informal
To hoodwink; trick.

[Middle English slippen, probably of Middle Low German or Middle Dutch origin; see lei- in Indo-European roots.]

slip 2

 (slĭp)
n.
1. A part of a plant cut or broken off for grafting or planting; a scion or cutting.
2. A long narrow piece; a strip.
3. A slender youthful person: a slip of a child.
4. A small piece of paper, especially a small form, document, or receipt: a deposit slip.
5. A narrow pew in a church.
tr.v. slipped, slip·ping, slips
To make a slip from (a plant or plant part).

[Probably from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch slippe.]

slip 3

 (slĭp)
n.
Thinned potter's clay used for decorating or coating ceramics.

[Middle English, slime, from Old English slypa; see sleubh- in Indo-European roots.]

SLIP

 (slĭp)
abbr.
Serial Line Internet Protocol
Translations

slipped

[ˈslɪpt] ADJ slipped dischernia f discal, vértebra f dislocada
References in classic literature ?
The slippers went on at once, a new handkerchief was slipped into her pocket, well scented with Amy's cologne, the rose was fastened in her bosom, and the nice gloves were pronounced a perfect fit.
As she went along she steadied herself with her hand, slipped along the papered walls of the hall and breathed with difficulty.
Cautiously I slipped from under the buffalo hide, got up on my knees and peered over the side of the wagon.
She slipped them upon her fingers; then clasping her knees, she looked across at Robert and began to laugh.
The secretary withdrew the letter, and slipped another in its place.
We'll talk of it again-- I'm in a hurry now," and, edging himself through the door, he slipped away.
Some connecting link had slipped out of the evidence, and could not anywhere be found.
Sometimes, indeed, when I dropped into coarseness, I perhaps came across traces of little understandings between them by which one of them should keep me occupied while the other slipped away.
When the revelry of his companions had mounted to its height, this man slipped away unobserved, and I saw no more of him till he became my comrade on the sea.
All honor to the Enderbies, therefore, whose house, I think, exists to the present day; though doubtless the original Samuel must long ago have slipped his cable for the great South Sea of the other world.
Safe in the yard, he slipped the scarf off my eyes, and shouted, "Here somebody
He crept down the bank, watching with all his eyes, slipped into the water, swam three or four strokes and climbed into the skiff that did "yawl" duty at the boat's stern.