slipshod


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slip·shod

 (slĭp′shŏd′)
adj.
1.
a. Carelessly done or arranged: slipshod research.
b. Careless or negligent: "Precise sentences were my ideals, though in practice I was slipshod and sentimental" (Wayne Koestenbaum). See Synonyms at sloppy.
2. Archaic Wearing shoes with the heel worn down.

slip′shod′di·ness n.

slipshod

(ˈslɪpˌʃɒd)
adj
1. (of an action) negligent; careless
2. (of a person's appearance) slovenly; down-at-heel
[C16: from slip1 + shod]
ˈslipˌshoddiness, ˈslipˌshodness n

slip•shod

(ˈslɪpˌʃɒd)

adj.
1. careless, untidy, or slovenly: slipshod work.
2. down-at-heel; seedy; shabby.
[1570–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.slipshod - marked by great carelessness; "a most haphazard system of record keeping"; "slapdash work"; "slipshod spelling"; "sloppy workmanship"
careless - marked by lack of attention or consideration or forethought or thoroughness; not careful; "careless about her clothes"; "forgotten by some careless person"; "a careless housekeeper"; "careless proofreading"; "it was a careless mistake"; "hurt by a careless remark"

slipshod

adjective careless, sloppy (informal), loose, slapdash, casual, untidy, slovenly, unsystematic The hotel had always been run in a slipshod way.

slipshod

adjective
1. Indifferent to correctness, accuracy, or neatness:
2. Marked by an absence of cleanliness and order:
Translations
غَيْر مُرَتَّب، غَيْر مُتْقَن
nedbalý
sjusket
puolihuolimaton
hroîvirknislegur
neporiadny

slipshod

[ˈslɪpʃɒd] ADJdescuidado, chapucero

slipshod

[ˈslɪpʃɒd] adj [approach, way] → négligent(e); [work] → négligé(e), peu soigné(e)

slipshod

adjschludrig

slipshod

[ˈslɪpˌʃɒd] adjsciatto/a, trascurato/a

slip1

(slip) past tense, past participle slipped verb
1. to slide accidentally and lose one's balance or footing. I slipped and fell on the path.
2. to slide, or drop, out of the right position or out of control. The plate slipped out of my grasp.
3. to drop in standard. I'm sorry about my mistake – I must be slipping!
4. to move quietly especially without being noticed. She slipped out of the room.
5. to escape from. The dog had slipped its lead and disappeared.
6. to put or pass (something) with a quick, light movement. She slipped the letter back in its envelope.
noun
1. an act of slipping. Her sprained ankle was a result of a slip on the path.
2. a usually small mistake. Everyone makes the occasional slip.
3. a kind of undergarment worn under a dress; a petticoat.
4. (also ˈslipway) a sloping platform next to water used for building and launching ships.
ˈslipper noun
a loose, soft kind of shoe for wearing indoors.
ˈslippery adjective
1. so smooth as to cause slipping. The path is slippery – watch out!
2. not trustworthy. He's rather a slippery character.
ˈslipperiness noun
slip road
a road for joining or leaving a motorway.
ˈslipshod adjective
(of work etc) untidy; careless. The teacher told him his work was slipshod.
give (someone) the slip
to escape from or avoid (someone) in a secretive manner. The crooks gave the policemen the slip.
let slip
1. to miss (an opportunity etc). I let the chance slip, unfortunately.
2. to say (something) unintentionally. She let slip some remark about my daughter.
slip into
to put on (clothes) quickly. She slipped into her nightdress.
slip off
1. to take (clothes) off quickly. Slip off your shoe.
2. to move away noiselessly or hurriedly. We'll slip off when no-one's looking.
slip on
to put on (clothes) quickly.
slip up to make a mistake; to fail to do something: They certainly slipped up badly over the new appointment (noun ˈslip-up)
References in classic literature ?
A regular German--rather stout, with brown hair tumbled all over his head, a bushy beard, good nose, the kindest eyes I ever saw, and a splendid big voice that does one's ears good, after our sharp or slipshod American gabble.
Of course that decided me at once to see them, for I never allow myself to do things by halves, or in a slurring, slipshod way.
The ways were foul and narrow; the shops and houses wretched; the people half-naked, drunken, slipshod, ugly.
This is the Court of Chancery, which has its decaying houses and its blighted lands in every shire, which has its worn-out lunatic in every madhouse and its dead in every churchyard, which has its ruined suitor with his slipshod heels and threadbare dress borrowing and begging through the round of every man's acquaintance, which gives to monied might the means abundantly of wearying out the right, which so exhausts finances, patience, courage, hope, so overthrows the brain and breaks the heart, that there is not an honourable man among its practitioners who would not give--who does not often give--the warning, "Suffer any wrong that can be done you rather than come here
This education is indispensable for whatever career you select, and it must not be slipshod or sketchy.
At intervals were heard the tread of slipshod feet, and the chilly cry of the poor sweep as he crept, shivering, to his early toil; the heavy footfall of the official watcher of the night, pacing slowly up and down and cursing the tardy hours that still intervened between him and sleep; the rambling of ponderous carts and waggons; the roll of the lighter vehicles which carried buyers and sellers to the different markets; the sound of ineffectual knocking at the doors of heavy sleepers--all these noises fell upon the ear from time to time, but all seemed muffled by the fog, and to be rendered almost as indistinct to the ear as was every object to the sight.
Inevitably, therefore, he is careless and slipshod, but some of his portrayals of sturdy English men and women and of romantic adventure (as in 'The Fair Maid of the West') are of refreshing naturalness and breeziness.
When driven with his mates to the new owners' camp, Buck saw a slipshod and slovenly affair, tent half stretched, dishes unwashed, everything in disorder; also, he saw a woman.
And then his shoes were so slipshod, I let him have a pair of yours, the old ones with the narrow caps--"
She had not character enough to take to drinking, and moaned about, slipshod and in curl-papers all day.
and caused the dickens of a lot of unpleasantness; but there in its usual slipshod way memory failed.
But they, refusing to comply, lest they should incur the anger of the mob, turned them into the streets, where they wandered up and down hardly remembering the ways untrodden by their feet so long, and crying--such abject things those rotten-hearted jails had made them--as they slunk off in their rags, and dragged their slipshod feet along the pavement.