slough


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Related to slough: slough off

Slough

 (slou)
A borough of southeast England, a residential and industrial suburb of London.

slough 1

 (slo͞o, slou) also slew (slo͞o)
n.
1. A depression or hollow, usually filled with deep mud or mire.
2. also slue A swamp, marsh, bog, or pond, especially as part of a bayou, inlet, or backwater.
3. A state of deep despair or moral degradation.

[Middle English, from Old English slōh.]

slough′y adj.

slough 2

 (slŭf)
n.
1. The dead outer skin shed by a reptile or amphibian.
2. Medicine A layer or mass of dead tissue separated from surrounding living tissue, as in a wound, sore, or inflammation.
3. An outer layer or covering that is shed or removed.
v. sloughed, slough·ing, sloughs
v.intr.
1. To be cast off or shed; come off: "smooth fallen branches from which all bark has sloughed" (David M. Carroll).
2. To shed a slough: every time that a snake sloughs.
3. Medicine To separate from surrounding living tissue. Used of dead tissue.
v.tr.
1. To cast off or shed (skin or a covering): came inside and sloughed off his coat.
2. To discard or disregard as undesirable or unfavorable: sloughed off her misgivings.
Phrasal Verb:
slough off
Slang To work less intensely than is required or expected.

[Middle English slughe; akin to Middle High German slūch, sluoch , sloughed off snake skin (Modern German Schlauch, hose, tire tube).]

slough

(slaʊ)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a hollow filled with mud; bog
2. (Physical Geography)
a. (in the prairies) a large hole where water collects or the water in such a hole
b. (in the northwest) a sluggish side channel of a river
c. (on the Pacific coast) a marshy saltwater inlet
3. despair or degradation
[Old English slōh; related to Middle High German sluoche ditch, Swedish slaga swamp]
ˈsloughy adj

slough

(slʌf)
n
1. (Biology) any outer covering that is shed, such as the dead outer layer of the skin of a snake, the cellular debris in a wound, etc
2. (Bridge) bridge Also: sluff a discarded card
vb
3. (Biology) (often foll by off) to shed (a skin, etc) or (of a skin, etc) to be shed
4. (Bridge) bridge Also: sluff to discard (a card or cards)
[C13: of Germanic origin; compare Middle Low German slū husk, German Schlauch hose, Norwegian slō fleshy part of a horn]
ˈsloughy adj

Slough

(slaʊ)
n
1. (Placename) an industrial town in SE central England, in Slough unitary authority, Berkshire; food products, high-tech industries. Pop: 126 276 (2001)
2. (Placename) a unitary authority in SE central England, in Berkshire. Pop: 118 800 (2003 est). Area: 28 sq km (11 sq miles)

slough1

(slaʊ for 1,2,4; slu for 3 )

n.
1. an area of soft, muddy ground; swamp or swamplike region.
2. a hole full of mire, as in a road.
3. Also, slew, slue. a marshy pool, inlet, backwater, or the like.
4. a condition of degradation or despair.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English slōh, c. Middle Low German slōch, Middle High German sluoche ditch]

slough2

(slʌf)

n.
1. the outer layer of the skin of a snake, which is cast off periodically.
2. a mass or layer of dead tissue separated from the surrounding or underlying tissue.
3. anything that is shed or cast off.
4. a discarded card.
v.i.
5. to be shed or cast off, as the slough of a snake.
6. to cast off a slough.
7. to separate from the sound flesh, as a slough.
8. to discard a card or cards.
v.t.
9. to dispose or get rid of; cast (often fol. by off): to slough off a bad habit.
10. to shed as or like a slough.
11. to discard (a card).
12. slough over, to treat as inconsequential.
[1250–1300; Middle English slughe, slouh skin of a snake, akin to Middle Low German slū, slō husk, shell, Middle High German slūch]
slough′i•ness, n.
slough′y, adj.

slough

(slŭf)
Noun
The dead outer skin shed by a reptile or an amphibian.
Verb
To shed an outer layer of skin.

slough


Past participle: sloughed
Gerund: sloughing

Imperative
slough
slough
Present
I slough
you slough
he/she/it sloughs
we slough
you slough
they slough
Preterite
I sloughed
you sloughed
he/she/it sloughed
we sloughed
you sloughed
they sloughed
Present Continuous
I am sloughing
you are sloughing
he/she/it is sloughing
we are sloughing
you are sloughing
they are sloughing
Present Perfect
I have sloughed
you have sloughed
he/she/it has sloughed
we have sloughed
you have sloughed
they have sloughed
Past Continuous
I was sloughing
you were sloughing
he/she/it was sloughing
we were sloughing
you were sloughing
they were sloughing
Past Perfect
I had sloughed
you had sloughed
he/she/it had sloughed
we had sloughed
you had sloughed
they had sloughed
Future
I will slough
you will slough
he/she/it will slough
we will slough
you will slough
they will slough
Future Perfect
I will have sloughed
you will have sloughed
he/she/it will have sloughed
we will have sloughed
you will have sloughed
they will have sloughed
Future Continuous
I will be sloughing
you will be sloughing
he/she/it will be sloughing
we will be sloughing
you will be sloughing
they will be sloughing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been sloughing
you have been sloughing
he/she/it has been sloughing
we have been sloughing
you have been sloughing
they have been sloughing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been sloughing
you will have been sloughing
he/she/it will have been sloughing
we will have been sloughing
you will have been sloughing
they will have been sloughing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been sloughing
you had been sloughing
he/she/it had been sloughing
we had been sloughing
you had been sloughing
they had been sloughing
Conditional
I would slough
you would slough
he/she/it would slough
we would slough
you would slough
they would slough
Past Conditional
I would have sloughed
you would have sloughed
he/she/it would have sloughed
we would have sloughed
you would have sloughed
they would have sloughed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.slough - necrotic tissue; a mortified or gangrenous part or mass
pathology - any deviation from a healthy or normal condition
cold gangrene, dry gangrene, mumification necrosis, mummification - (pathology) gangrene that develops in the presence of arterial obstruction and is characterized by dryness of the dead tissue and a dark brown color
clostridial myonecrosis, emphysematous gangrene, emphysematous phlegmon, gangrenous emphysema, gas gangrene, gas phlegmon, progressive emphysematous necrosis - (pathology) a deadly form of gangrene usually caused by clostridium bacteria that produce toxins that cause tissue death; can be used as a bioweapon
2.slough - a hollow filled with mud
bog, peat bog - wet spongy ground of decomposing vegetation; has poorer drainage than a swamp; soil is unfit for cultivation but can be cut and dried and used for fuel
3.slough - a stagnant swamp (especially as part of a bayou)
swamp, swampland - low land that is seasonally flooded; has more woody plants than a marsh and better drainage than a bog
4.slough - any outer covering that can be shed or cast off (such as the cast-off skin of a snake)
covering, natural covering, cover - a natural object that covers or envelops; "under a covering of dust"; "the fox was flushed from its cover"
Verb1.slough - cast off hair, skin, horn, or feathersslough - cast off hair, skin, horn, or feathers; "our dog sheds every Spring"
desquamate, peel off - peel off in scales; "dry skin desquamates"
cast off, shed, throw off, throw away, shake off, throw, cast, drop - get rid of; "he shed his image as a pushy boss"; "shed your clothes"

slough 1

noun
A usually low-lying area of soft waterlogged ground and standing water:

slough 2

verb
To cast off by a natural process:
Translations
ham
luodamasennusrämesuo

slough

1 [slʌf]
A. N
1. (Zool) → camisa f, piel f vieja (que muda la serpiente)
2. (Med) → escara f
B. VTmudar, echar de sí (fig) → deshacerse de, desechar
C. VIdesprenderse, caerse
slough off
A. VT + ADVmudar, echar de sí (fig) → deshacerse de, desechar
B. VI + ADVdesprenderse, caerse

slough

2 [slaʊ] N (= swamp) → fangal m, cenagal m (fig) → abismo m
the slough of despondel abatimiento más profundo, el abismo de la desesperación

slough

[ˈslʌf] vt
to slough its skin (= shed) [snake] → muer
slough off
vt sep (= get rid of) → se débarrasser de

slough

1
n (liter)Morast m; (= swamp also)Sumpf m (also fig liter); to sink into the Slough of Despond (liter)in tiefe Verzweiflung stürzen (liter)

slough

2
n (Zool) → abgestreifte Haut; (Med) → Schorf m
vt (snake) skinabstreifen; it sloughs (off) its skinsie häutet sich

slough

n. esfacelo, masa de tejido muerto que se ha desprendido de un tejido vivo.

slough

vi (también to — off) desprenderse, caerse
References in classic literature ?
We were in the Slough of Despond tonight, and Mother came and pulled us out as Help did in the book.
There was a slough or a creek leading out of it on the other side that went miles away, I don't know where, but it didn't go to the river.
I wrestled with my own resolution: I wanted to be weak that I might avoid the awful passage of further suffering I saw laid out for me; and Conscience, turned tyrant, held Passion by the throat, told her tauntingly, she had yet but dipped her dainty foot in the slough, and swore that with that arm of iron he would thrust her down to unsounded depths of agony.
Well, you dropped Linton with it into a Slough of Despond.
The maidenly bosom bared to this, the pretty almost-child's head thus distracted, the delicate foot mincing in this slough of blood and dirt, were types of the disjointed time.
That comes--as you call it--of being arrant asses," retorted the doctor, "and not having sense enough to know honest air from poison, and the dry land from a vile, pestiferous slough.
While stumbling through this Slough of Despond, he was called to Washington by his patent lawyer.
He affirmed that no man, without Heaven's especial warrants should attempt their conversion, lest while he lent his hand to draw them from the slough, he should himself be precipitated into its lowest depths.
Then go I and wash, Flathead; but, it is true, in the great heats I have wished I could slough my skin without pain, and run skinless.
Smooth-it-away, "is the famous Slough of Despond--a disgrace to all the neighborhood; and the greater that it might so easily be converted into firm ground.
But the young man wrote that his father, an india-rubber merchant who lived in Slough, did not approve of the union, and Fraulein Thekla was often in tears.
talk, they drew nigh to a very miry slough, that was in the