slowing

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slow

 (slō)
adj. slow·er, slow·est
1.
a. Not moving or able to move quickly; proceeding at a low speed: a slow train; slow walkers.
b. Marked by a retarded tempo: a slow waltz.
2.
a. Taking or requiring a long time: the slow job of making bread.
b. Taking more time than is usual: a slow worker; slow progress in the peace negotiations.
3. Allowing movement or action only at a low speed: a slow track; a slow infield.
4. Registering a time or rate behind or below the correct one: a slow clock.
5. Lacking in promptness or willingness; not precipitate: They were slow to accept our invitation.
6. Characterized by a low volume of sales or transactions: Business was slow today.
7. Lacking liveliness or interest; boring: a slow party.
8. Not having or exhibiting intellectual or mental quickness: a slow learner.
9. Only moderately warm; low: a slow oven.
adv. slower, slowest
1. So as to fall behind the correct time or rate: The watch runs slow.
2. At a low speed: Go slow!
v. slowed, slow·ing, slows
v.tr.
1. To make slow or slower.
2. To delay; retard.
v.intr.
To become slow or slower.

[Middle English, from Old English slāw, obtuse, sluggish, dim-witted; akin to Dutch slee, blunt, dull, and Old Norse sljór, blunt, dim-witted.]

slow′ly adv.
slow′ness n.
Synonyms: slow, dilatory, leisurely, laggard
These adjectives mean taking more time than is usual or necessary. Slow is the least specific: a slow bus; a slow heartbeat; slow to anger. Dilatory implies lack of promptness caused by delay, procrastination, or indifference: paid a late fee because I was dilatory in paying the bill. Leisurely suggests a relaxed lack of haste: went for a leisurely walk by the river. Laggard implies hanging back or falling behind: "the horses' laggard pace" (Rudyard Kipling).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.slowing - a decrease in rate of changeslowing - a decrease in rate of change; "the deceleration of the arms race"
alteration, change, modification - an event that occurs when something passes from one state or phase to another; "the change was intended to increase sales"; "this storm is certainly a change for the worse"; "the neighborhood had undergone few modifications since his last visit years ago"
References in classic literature ?
I perceived by this slowing down of its rising and setting that the work of the tidal drag was done.
His gray, appalling face had attracted attention in the crowd, and men, slowing to his dreary pace, were walking with him.
He walked slowing into the front hall, waited for a moment and then accepted his coat and hat from a servant.