sloyd


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Related to sloyd: sloyd knife

sloyd

 (sloid)
n.
A system of manual training developed in Sweden, based on the use of tools in woodworking.

[Swedish slöjd, skill, skilled labor; akin to Old Norse slœgdh, dexterity; see sleight.]

sloyd

(slɔɪd)
n
(Education) an originally Swedish education system involving the teaching of crafts, including woodwork, to improve child development
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References in periodicals archive ?
Henderson actively promoted his educational ideas in 1897 by giving public lectures on organic education at the Boston Sloyd Training School.
A total of 7 1st class adjunct teachers taught chants, 2 taught chants and gymnastics, 1 taught only gymnastics, 5 taught sloyd, 2 taught sloyd and molding, 1 taught molding, 1 taught work with flowers, 3 taught drawing and manual work, 1 taught only drawing, 1 taught manual work and physical culture, and 1 taught a class for free.
Unlike the Sloyd method and manual training of Calvin Woodward in St.
Sloyd was a woodworking and tool-using educational system begun in Finland in 1865 and later adopted by schools in the United States.
En este sentido, Square1 se relaciona en cierta medida con los principios de la Educacion Sloyd, un movimiento educativo iniciado en Finlandia en la decada de 1860, que abogaba por la educacion general a base de artesania.
He also describes the legacy of the ideas and practice of sloyd education, and its continuing influence on educational technology.
The hand and the eye are drawn to the metal handles and chip carving by Jeno Galambos and Karoly Porges respectively as if one is being prepared for the benefits of Sloyd education.
47) By 1908 ongoing congestion obliged them to resort once again to subdividing the assembly room, this time creating four classrooms, bringing the total to 33 classes aside from the kindergarten, cookery and Sloyd rooms.
Very popular in the United States in the decades surrounding The Education of Henry Adams, the sloyd curriculum asked students to work on conventional models (a letter opener or soup ladle or ax handle) that could be carved with a knife.
The first, the practical educators, the group into which Jackson is best placed, promoted manual training, sloyd, science, drawing, nature study and physical education.
Certainly there are "skills and drills" versions of vocational education: the method of sloyd, for example, used by the manual training movement, took students through a graduated series of woodworking exercises.
As a result of an exhibit at the Philadelphia Exposition of 1876, White learned of the work of Otto Salomon, director the Sloyd Training School in Naas, Sweden.