slubber

slubber

(ˈslʌbə)
vb
1. (tr) to smear or daub
2. (tr) to do in a hurried or imperfect manner
3. (intr) another word for slobber
n
4. (Crafts) a person who uses a slubbing-machine
5. (Crafts) the machine itself
References in classic literature ?
While the rescued Kwaque continued to moan and slubber thankfulness at his feet, he proceeded to strip them that were naked.
He knew their many noises that were as grunts and slubbers.
I saw Bassanio and Antonio part: Bassanio told him he would make some speed Of his return: he answer'd, 'Do not so; Slubber not business for my sake, Bassanio But stay the very riping of the time; And for the Jew's bond which he hath of me, Let it not enter in your mind of love: Be merry, and employ your chiefest thoughts To courtship and such fair ostents of love As shall conveniently become you there:' And even there, his eye being big with tears, Turning his face, he put his hand behind him, And with affection wondrous sensible He wrung Bassanio's hand; and so they parted.
Blurt is derided as 'thou little morsel of Justice' by his clerk Slubber.
The word Slubber comes from the textile industry which involved the removal of knots from wool.
The women workers who contributed affidavits on behalf of the NUTW in 1983 came from numerous departments in the large Frametex mill, including doffers, (13) winders, slubbers (14) and weavers.
Good pubs there include: The King's Head, The Sportsman on St John's Road, the Vulcan in St Peter's Street and Slubbers Arms on Halifax Old Road.
All the women had recently moved to Huddersfield and had just left the Slubbers Arms when the accident happened.
She had been with the other three women at the Slubbers Arms in Huddersfield, celebrating one of them moving to a new house in the West Yorkshire town.
This last happened to me outside The Slubbers Arms in Birkby many years ago when two tykes, guarding a pram containing a floppy-limbed effigy, made the plea and I dropped coins into the collecting cup.
For example, the Croppers Arms at Marsh relates to cropping, 'raising the nap on cloth, then cutting it short to improve the finish', or the Slubbers Arms at Hillhouse derived from slubbing, the process of drawing the fibres out further and joining them end to end.
The crossroads, opposite the Slubbers Arms public house, was blocked on the Huddersfield-bound side for a time while emergency services dealt with the aftermath.