small change


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small change

n.
1. Coins of low denomination.
2. Something of little value or significance.

small change

n
1. coins, esp those of low value
2. a person or thing that is not outstanding or important

small′ change′


n.
1. coins of small denomination.
2. an insignificant person or thing.
[1810–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.small change - a trifling sum of money
cash, hard cash, hard currency - money in the form of bills or coins; "there is a desperate shortage of hard cash"

small change

noun
1. A small or trifling amount of money:
Informal: peanut (used in plural).
2. Something or things that are unimportant:
Translations
قِطَع نُقود صَغيرَه
drobné
småpenge
smámynt

small change

nspiccioli mpl

small

(smoːl) adjective
1. little in size, degree, importance etc; not large or great. She was accompanied by a small boy of about six; There's only a small amount of sugar left; She cut the meat up small for the baby.
2. not doing something on a large scale. He's a small businessman.
3. little; not much. You have small reason to be satisfied with yourself.
4. (of the letters of the alphabet) not capital. The teacher showed the children how to write a capital G and a small g.
small ads
advertisements in the personal columns of a newspaper.
small arms
weapons small and light enough to be carried by a man. They found a hoard of rifles and other small arms belonging to the rebels.
small change
coins of small value. a pocketful of small change.
small hours
the hours immediately after midnight. He woke up in the small hours.
ˈsmallpox noun
a type of serious infectious disease in which there is a severe rash of large, pus-filled spots that usually leave scars.
small screen
television, not the cinema. This play is intended for the small screen.
ˈsmall-time adjective
(of a thief etc) not working on a large scale. a small-time crook/thief.
feel/look small
to feel or look foolish or insignificant. He criticized her in front of her colleagues and made her feel very small.
References in classic literature ?
But let us put our hands in our trousers pockets, and let there be some small change in the right-hand one and a bunch of keys in the left, and we will face a female post-office clerk.
But even a small change in the disposition of the weight will produce violent changes in the behaviour of a coracle.
If there be troutlets enough," said Don Quixote, "they will be the same thing as a trout; for it is all one to me whether I am given eight reals in small change or a piece of eight; moreover, it may be that these troutlets are like veal, which is better than beef, or kid, which is better than goat.
He looked it out from a handful of small change, folded it in some crumpled paper, and gave it to me.
He took off his hat, and moved mechanically toward the stand; and there he found a small change that was a great one to him.
I'll bet you a horn of brandy," said the first, "that the chap has either a pocket-book, or a snug little hoard of small change, stowed away amongst his shirts.
I thought of it all the more, too, when the bouman brought out a green purse with four guineas in gold, and the best part of another in small change.
It was almost like a lot of boys scramblin' on the sidewalk for a handful of small change.
Possibly," he sighed, "but they invariably want it back in such very small change.
The Frenchman found some small change and gave twenty kopeks to each of the pilgrims.
The small change was made, we stepped on board, and the ropes were cast off.
She took up a collection of all our small change, and herself tossed it overside, singly and in handfuls, arranging the terms of the contests, chiding a miss, giving extra rewards to clever wins, in short, managing the whole exhibition.