smarts


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smart

 (smärt)
adj. smart·er, smart·est
1.
a. Having or showing intelligence; bright. See Synonyms at intelligent.
b. Canny and shrewd in dealings with others: a smart negotiator.
2.
a. Amusingly clever; witty: a smart quip; a lively, smart conversation.
b. Impertinent; insolent: That's enough of your smart talk.
3. Energetic or quick in movement: a smart pace.
4. Fashionable; elegant: a smart suit; a smart restaurant; the smart set. See Synonyms at fashionable.
5. Capable of making adjustments that resemble those resulting from human decisions, chiefly by means of electronic sensors and computer technology: smart missiles; smart machines.
intr.v. smart·ed, smart·ing, smarts
1.
a. To cause a sharp, usually superficial, stinging pain: The slap delivered to my face smarted.
b. To be the location of such a pain: The incision on my leg smarts.
c. To feel such a pain.
2. To suffer acutely, as from mental distress, wounded feelings, or remorse: "No creature smarts so little as a fool" (Alexander Pope).
n.
1. Sharp pain or anguish: the smart of the wound.
2. smarts Slang Intelligence; expertise: a reporter with a lot of smarts.
Phrasal Verb:
smart off Informal
To speak or act impertinently.
Idiom:
right smart New England & Southern US
A lot; a considerable amount: "We have read right smart of that book" (Catherine C. Hopley).

[Middle English, stinging, keen, alert, from Old English smeart, causing pain.]

smart′ly adv.
smart′ness n.

smarts

(smɑːts)
pl n
slang chiefly US know-how, intelligence, or wits: street smarts.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
However, as there was no bagman to look on, nobody knew anything at all about the matter; and so Tom Smart and his clay-coloured gig with the red wheels, and the vixenish mare with the fast pace, went on together, keeping the secret among them, and nobody was a bit the wiser.
There's smart enough,' whimpered Mr Fledgeby, groaning and writhing again, 'for sixty.
Their dress was very smart, their manners very civil, they were delighted with the house, and in raptures with the furniture, and they happened to be so doatingly fond of children that Lady Middleton's good opinion was engaged in their favour before they had been an hour at the Park.
PETER, SOURLY: "Your Uncle Roger thought he was pretty smart.
He never took all the straw away, and the smell from what lay underneath was very bad; while the strong vapors that rose made my eyes smart and inflame, and I did not feel the same appetite for my food.
You're a lad, you are, but you're as smart as paint.
The infantry who had been stopped crowded near the bridge in the trampled mud and gazed with that particular feeling of ill-will, estrangement, and ridicule with which troops of different arms usually encounter one another at the clean, smart hussars who moved past them in regular order.
He'd take him back, and put him to hoeing and digging, and "see if he'd step about so smart.
At length a man came from a distance and wooed her, who was called Hans; but he stipulated that Clever Elsie should be really smart.