smattering

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smat·ter·ing

 (smăt′ər-ĭng)
n.
1. A superficial knowledge of something, especially a language: I picked up a smattering of German while on vacation in Germany.
2. A small, scattered amount or number: a smattering of raindrops.

smattering

(ˈsmætərɪŋ)
n
1. a slight or superficial knowledge
2. a small amount
ˈsmatteringly adv

smat•ter•ing

(ˈsmæt ər ɪŋ)

n.
a slight, superficial, or introductory knowledge of something: a smattering of Latin.
[1530–40]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.smattering - a small number or amountsmattering - a small number or amount; "only a handful of responses were received"
small indefinite amount, small indefinite quantity - an indefinite quantity that is below average size or magnitude
2.smattering - a slight or superficial understanding of a subject
discernment, savvy, understanding, apprehension - the cognitive condition of someone who understands; "he has virtually no understanding of social cause and effect"

smattering

noun modicum, dash, rudiments, bit, elements, sprinkling, passing acquaintance, nodding acquaintance, smatter a smattering of Greek grammar
Translations
少し少数少量

smattering

[ˈsmætərɪŋ] N to have a smattering oftener cierta idea or algunas nociones de
I have a smattering of Catalantengo cierta idea or algunas nociones de catalán

smattering

[ˈsmætərɪŋ] n
a smattering of sth → quelques notions de qch

smattering

n a smattering of Frenchein paar Brocken Französisch

smattering

[ˈsmætrɪŋ] n to have a smattering ofavere un'infarinatura di
References in classic literature ?
We traveled everywhere--years and years-- picking up smatterings of strange tongues, familiarizing ourselves with strange sights and strange customs, accumulating an education of a wide and varied and curious sort.
Jurgis heard smatterings of it, for the reason that terror kept him awake-- he knew that he snored abominably, and to have been put out just then would have been like a sentence of death to him.
At the same time, I was not only reading many books besides Thackeray's, but I was studying to get a smattering of several languages as well as I could, with or without help.
He had, already, accompanied his master on several journeys, and had a smattering of science appropriate to his condition and style of mind, but he was especially remarkable for a sort of mild philosophy, a charming turn of optimism.
After all I was half a madman ever to have expected it - a rough, coarse chap like me, with only a smattering of polite ways
Without having been in the school of the Abbe Faria, the worthy master of The Young Amelia (the name of the Genoese tartan) knew a smattering of all the tongues spoken on the shores of that large lake called the Mediterranean, from the Arabic to the Provencal, and this, while it spared him interpreters, persons always troublesome and frequently indiscreet, gave him great facilities of communication, either with the vessels he met at sea, with the small boats sailing along the coast, or with the people without name, country, or occupation, who are always seen on the quays of seaports, and who live by hidden and mysterious means which we must suppose to be a direct gift of providence, as they have no visible means of support.
D'Arnot knew a few words of Norwegian, Russian, Greek, and also had a smattering of the language of one of the West Coast negro tribes--the man denied them all.
The words "father," "sick," and "come," however she finally understood after several repetitions, for she had picked up a smattering of the Dyak language during her enforced association with the natives.
She went to a dame-school and learnt a few useful things well; that is better than a smattering of half a dozen so-called higher branches, I take the liberty of thinking.
Your smattering of science, sir," she said, with a malicious smile, "includes, I presume, a smattering of medicine as well?
They sus- pected it was writing, because those among them who knew how to read Latin and had a smattering of Greek, recognized some of the letters, but they could make nothing out of the result as a whole.
There were several of his priests and lawyers present (as I conjectured by their habits), who were commanded to address themselves to me; and I spoke to them in as many languages as I had the least smattering of, which were High and Low Dutch, Latin, French, Spanish, Italian, and Lingua Franca, but all to no purpose.