smelling


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Related to smelling: smelling salts, Smelling Disorders

smell

 (smĕl)
n.
1.
a. The sense, located in the nasal cavities of mammals and relying on the olfactory nerves, by which molecules borne in a fluid such as air can be perceived; the olfactory sense.
b. A similar sense in other animals, as insects' ability to perceive air-borne molecules with their antennae.
2. The act or an instance of smelling: got a smell of the pie.
3.
a. A quality of something that is perceived by the sense of smell; an odor: the smell of a barn.
b. A distinctive enveloping or characterizing quality; an aura or trace: the smell of success.
v. smelled or smelt (smĕlt), smell·ing, smells
v.tr.
1.
a. To perceive (an odor) by the sense of smell.
b. To perceive or detect (something) by a chemosensory organ, such as an antenna.
2. To inhale the air near (something); sniff: smiled as she smelled the rose.
3. To detect or discover, as by intuition or inference: We smelled trouble ahead. The committee tried to smell out corruption in law enforcement.
v.intr.
1. To use the sense of smell.
2. To sniff: The dog was smelling around the bed.
3.
a. To have or emit an odor: "The breeze smelled exactly like Vouvray—flowery, with a hint of mothballs underneath" (Anne Tyler).
b. To have or emit an unpleasant odor; stink: This closet smells.
4.
a. To be suggestive; have a touch of something: a remark that smells of sanctimony.
b. To appear to be dishonest or corrupt: The political situation is starting to smell.
Idioms:
smell a rat Slang
To suspect that something is wrong.
smell blood
To sense an opportunity for advantage at someone else's expense.
smell the roses
To spend time in leisurely enjoyment.

[Middle English smel, of unknown origin.]
Synonyms: smell, aroma, odor, scent
These nouns denote a quality that can be perceived by the olfactory sense: the smell of smoke; the aroma of frying onions; hospital odors; the scent of pine needles.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.smelling - the act of perceiving the odor of somethingsmelling - the act of perceiving the odor of something
sensing, perception - becoming aware of something via the senses
sniff, snuff - sensing an odor by inhaling through the nose
Adj.1.smelling - (used with `of' or `with') noticeably odorous; "the hall was redolent of floor wax"; "air redolent with the fumes of beer and whiskey"
odorous - having odor or a characteristic odor; "odorous jasmine flowers"; "odorous garbage"; "fresh odorous bread"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
On the tenth day from now the circle of the Ingomboco must be set, and there shall be such a smelling out of wizards and of witches as has not been known in Zululand
The witch-doctresses also stood on one side, wonderstruck, since no such smelling out as this had been seen in the land.
At length it drew on to evening, and the last company of the witch- doctors did their work, smelling out some of the keepers of the Emposeni, the house of the women.
A study reported by the Daily Mail showed how that people who are in front of a bakery, smelling the aroma of baked breads are more likely to help a stranger in need.
You can link this to the way we Filipinos are always smelling our food before we eat, or, in cafeterias, before we buy.
Astronaut Don Pettit agrees, he called it "sweet smelling welding fumes," in a post (https://spaceflight.
Modern professional perfumers train at specialist colleges, smelling odourants on paper strips in thousands of combinations until they can identify hundreds of materials and nuances in quality.
Described as smelling similar to manure, Old Swan appears to be the latest area inflicted by the pungent odour.
The participants were then shown a word that either matched the smell, was related to the smell (as in the word "chocolate" after smelling peanut butter) or unrelated to the smell (the word "chocolate" after smelling gasoline).
What we really need to know is whose nose was doing the smelling, how the definition of "smell" changed over time and according to constituency (did the people living in the "filth" agree?
So, if you are good at smelling blue cheese, it doesn't mean you're necessarily good at smelling the apple next to it.
Dr Stafford found people have a heightened sense of smell to non-food odours when they are hungry, but participants were better at smelling food after eating.