smite


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smite

 (smīt)
v. smote (smōt), smit·ten (smĭt′n) or smote, smit·ing, smites
v.tr.
1.
a. To inflict a heavy blow on, with or as if with the hand, a tool, or a weapon.
b. To drive or strike (a weapon, for example) forcefully onto or into something else.
2. To attack, damage, or destroy by or as if by blows.
3.
a. To afflict: The population was smitten by the plague.
b. To afflict retributively; chasten or chastise.
4. To affect sharply with great feeling: He was smitten by deep remorse.
v.intr.
To deal a blow with or as if with the hand or a handheld weapon.

[Middle English smiten, from Old English smītan, to smear.]

smit′er n.

smite

(smaɪt)
vb (mainly tr) , smites, smiting, smote, smitten or smit
1. to strike with a heavy blow or blows
2. to damage with or as if with blows
3. to afflict or affect severely: smitten with flu.
4. to afflict in order to punish
5. (foll by: on) to strike forcibly or abruptly: the sun smote down on him.
[Old English smītan; related to Old High German smīzan to smear, Gothic bismeitan, Old Swedish smēta to daub]
ˈsmiter n

smite

(smaɪt)

v. smote, smit•ten or smit (smɪt) or smote, smit•ing. v.t.
1. to strike or hit hard, with or as if with the hand, a stick, or other weapon.
2. to deliver or deal (a blow) by striking hard.
3. to strike down, injure, or slay.
4. to afflict or attack with deadly or disastrous effect: smitten by polio.
5. to affect mentally, morally, or emotionally with a strong and sudden feeling: They were smitten with terror.
6. to impress favorably; enamor: He was smitten by her charms.
v.i.
7. to strike; deal a blow.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English smītan to smear, defile, c. Old Frisian smīta, Old High German smīzan, Gothic -smeitan]
smit′er, n.

smite


Past participle: smote
Gerund: smiting

Imperative
smite
smite
Present
I smite
you smite
he/she/it smites
we smite
you smite
they smite
Preterite
I smote
you smote
he/she/it smote
we smote
you smote
they smote
Present Continuous
I am smiting
you are smiting
he/she/it is smiting
we are smiting
you are smiting
they are smiting
Present Perfect
I have smote
you have smote
he/she/it has smote
we have smote
you have smote
they have smote
Past Continuous
I was smiting
you were smiting
he/she/it was smiting
we were smiting
you were smiting
they were smiting
Past Perfect
I had smote
you had smote
he/she/it had smote
we had smote
you had smote
they had smote
Future
I will smite
you will smite
he/she/it will smite
we will smite
you will smite
they will smite
Future Perfect
I will have smote
you will have smote
he/she/it will have smote
we will have smote
you will have smote
they will have smote
Future Continuous
I will be smiting
you will be smiting
he/she/it will be smiting
we will be smiting
you will be smiting
they will be smiting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been smiting
you have been smiting
he/she/it has been smiting
we have been smiting
you have been smiting
they have been smiting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been smiting
you will have been smiting
he/she/it will have been smiting
we will have been smiting
you will have been smiting
they will have been smiting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been smiting
you had been smiting
he/she/it had been smiting
we had been smiting
you had been smiting
they had been smiting
Conditional
I would smite
you would smite
he/she/it would smite
we would smite
you would smite
they would smite
Past Conditional
I would have smote
you would have smote
he/she/it would have smote
we would have smote
you would have smote
they would have smote
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.smite - inflict a heavy blow on, with the hand, a tool, or a weapon
hit - deal a blow to, either with the hand or with an instrument; "He hit her hard in the face"
2.smite - affect suddenly with deep feeling; "He was smitten with love for this young girl"
impress, strike, affect, move - have an emotional or cognitive impact upon; "This child impressed me as unusually mature"; "This behavior struck me as odd"
3.smite - cause physical pain or suffering in; "afflict with the plague"
damage - inflict damage upon; "The snow damaged the roof"; "She damaged the car when she hit the tree"
visit - assail; "He was visited with a terrible illness that killed him quickly"
blight, plague - cause to suffer a blight; "Too much rain may blight the garden with mold"

smite

verb
1. To deliver a powerful blow to suddenly and sharply:
Informal: biff, bop, clip, wallop.
Slang: belt, conk, paste.
Idioms: let someone have it, sock it to someone.
2. To bring great harm or suffering to:
Translations

smite

[smaɪt] (smote (pt) (smitten (pp))) VT (archaic, liter) (= strike) → golpear; (= punish) → castigar
my conscience smote meme remordió la conciencia
see also smitten

smite

pret <smote>, ptp <smitten>
vt (old, liter)schlagen; he smote off his header schlug or hieb (old, liter)ihm den Kopf ab; the sound of gunfire smote our earsder Lärm von Schüssen schlug an unsere Ohren; and the Lord shall smite them downund der Herr wird sie zerschmettern

smite

[smaɪt] (smote (pt) (smitten (pp))) vt (old) (strike) → colpire; (punish) → punire
References in classic literature ?
Then, suddenly lifting up his voice, amid the eternal din of the waters, he sang aloud: "First born of Egypt, smite did he, Of mankind, and of beast also: O, Egypt
It is not to be conceived, before-hand, what wonderful wind-instruments are these old timber mansions, and how haunted with the strangest noises, which immediately begin to sing, and sigh, and sob, and shriek,--and to smite with sledge-hammers, airy but ponderous, in some distant chamber, --and to tread along the entries as with stately footsteps, and rustle up and down the staircase, as with silks miraculously stiff,--whenever the gale catches the house with a window open, and gets fairly into it.
He peremptorily denied for example, that any whale could so smite his stout sloop-of-war as to cause her to leak so much as a thimbleful.
His cleaver had a blade about two feet long, and he never made but one cut; he made it so neatly, too, that his implement did not smite through and dull itself--there was just enough force for a perfect cut, and no more.
and for what does he hold the thunders in his right hand, if not to smite the oppressor, and deliver the spoiled out of the hand of the spoiler?
I smite this bosom with these two hands as I smite it now, and I tell him, `Defarge, I was brought up among the fishermen of the sea-shore, and that peasant family so injured by the two Evremonde brothers, as that Bastille paper describes, is my family.