snail

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snail

 (snāl)
n.
1. Any of numerous aquatic or terrestrial gastropod mollusks that typically have a spirally coiled shell, retractile foot, and distinct head.
2. A slow-moving, lazy, or sluggish person.

[Middle English, from Old English snægl.]

snail

(sneɪl)
n
1. (Animals) any of numerous terrestrial or freshwater gastropod molluscs with a spirally coiled shell, esp any of the family Helicidae, such as Helix aspersa (garden snail)
2. (Animals) any other gastropod with a spirally coiled shell, such as a whelk
3. a slow-moving or lazy person or animal
[Old English snægl; related to Old Norse snigill, Old High German snecko]
ˈsnail-ˌlike adj

snail

(sneɪl)

n.
1. any slow-moving gastropod mollusk, having a spirally coiled shell and a ventral muscular foot.
2. a slow or lazy person.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English snegel, c. Old Saxon, Old High German snegel, Old Norse snigill]

Snail

 Military, a D-shaped formation, 1579.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.snail - freshwater or marine or terrestrial gastropod mollusk usually having an external enclosing spiral shellsnail - freshwater or marine or terrestrial gastropod mollusk usually having an external enclosing spiral shell
gastropod, univalve - a class of mollusks typically having a one-piece coiled shell and flattened muscular foot with a head bearing stalked eyes
scorpion shell - any of numerous tropical marine snails that as adults have the outer lip of the aperture produced into a series of long curved spines
edible snail, Helix pomatia - one of the chief edible snails
garden snail - any of several inedible snails of the genus Helix; often destructive pests
2.snail - edible terrestrial snail usually served in the shell with a sauce of melted butter and garlicsnail - edible terrestrial snail usually served in the shell with a sauce of melted butter and garlic
edible snail, Helix pomatia - one of the chief edible snails
meat - the flesh of animals (including fishes and birds and snails) used as food
Verb1.snail - gather snails; "We went snailing in the summer"
whelk - gather whelk
gather, pull together, collect, garner - assemble or get together; "gather some stones"; "pull your thoughts together"

snail

Snails, slugs and other gastropods

abalone or ear shell, conch, cowrie or cowry, limpet, murex, nudibranch or sea slug, ormer or sea-ear, periwinkle or winkle, ramshorn snail, Roman snail, sea hare, slug, snail, top-shell, triton, wentletrap, whelk
Translations
حَلَزونحَلَزُون
охлюв
caragol
hlemýžďšnek
snegl
heliko
tigu
etanakuorellinen etana
स्थलीय घोंघा
puž
csigacsiga2
bekicotkeongsiput
snigill
カタツムリ
달팽이
cochlea
sraigėvėžlio žingsniu
gliemezis
melc
slimák
polž
пуж
snäckasnigel
หอยทาก
salyangozsümüklüböcek
con ốc sênốc

snail

[sneɪl]
A. Ncaracol m
at a snail's pacea paso de tortuga
B. CPD snail mail N (hum) → correo m normal
snail shell Nconcha f de caracol

snail

[ˈsneɪl] nescargot m
a snail's pace → une extrême lenteur
at a snail's pace → avec une extrême lenteursnail mail n
to send sth by snail mail → envoyer qch par la poste

snail

nSchnecke f; edible snailWeinbergschnecke f; at a snail’s paceim Schneckentempo

snail

[sneɪl] nchiocciola
at a snail's pace → a passo di lumaca

snail

(sneil) noun
a kind of soft-bodied small crawling animal with a coiled shell. Snails leave a silvery trail as they move along.
at a snail's pace
very slowly. The old man walked along at a snail's pace.

snail

حَلَزُون hlemýžď snegl Schnecke σαλιγκάρι caracol kuorellinen etana escargot puž lumaca カタツムリ 달팽이 slak snegle ślimak caracol улитка snigel หอยทาก salyangoz con ốc sên 蜗牛

snail

n caracol m
References in periodicals archive ?
1 g of toxic bait: metaldehyde-based Corry's[R] Slug and Snail Pellets (Matson LLC, North Bend, Washington), orthoboric acidbased Niban[R] Granular Bait (Nisus Corporation, Rockford, Tennessee), iron phosphate--based Ecosense[R] Slug and Snail Killer (Ortho, Marysville, Ohio), or sodium ferric EDTA--based Ferroxx[R] Slug and Snail Bait (Neudorff North America, Brentwood Bay, Canada).
If any are found, it may be possible to reduce or eliminate the population by intensive manual collection, a species-specific toxin in snail bait, or a combination of both (GISD, 2015).
However, snails and slugs could be controlled by snail bait pellets.
Apply snail bait regularly -- either the meal or granule form.
For snails and slugs, use an iron phosphate snail bait such as Sluggo.
Certis USA product brands include its granulovirus products CYD-X[R] codling moth virus, Gemstar[R] corn earworm virus, and Spod-X[R] beet armyworm virus; as well as Agree[R], Crymax[R], Deliver[R] and Javelin[R] Bt bioinsecticides; Azatin[R], Neemazad[R] and Neemix[R] botanical insect growth regulators; Trilogy[R] botanical fungicide/miticide; SoilGard[R] microbial fungicide; MeloCon[R] bionematicide; Basamid[R] granular soil fumigant; SCREEN Duo[TM] heat stress management for plants; DES-X[TM] insecticidal soap concentrate; Cueva[TM] liquid copper fungicide concentrate; Seduce(TM)insecticidal bait; Final-San(TM)-O herbicidal concentrate; Sluggo[R] slug and snail bait (Eastern markets only) and Bug-N-Sluggo[R] insect, slug and snail bait; and now PFR-97TM insecticidal fungus.
It is imperative that snail bait be scattered around plantings of primroses.
Be sure to wash off any insects and don't use snail bait or insecticides.