snatch


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snatch

 (snăch)
v. snatched, snatch·ing, snatch·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To grasp or seize hastily, eagerly, or suddenly: snatched the dollar from my hand.
b. To steal, especially quickly or with a sudden movement.
c. Informal To kidnap (someone).
2. Sports To raise (a weight) in one quick, uninterrupted motion from the floor to a position over the lifter's head.
3. Informal
a. To obtain or achieve quickly or unexpectantly: snatched an early lead in the game.
b. To get (a small amount of sleep).
v.intr.
To make grasping or seizing motions: snatched at the lamp cord.
n.
1.
a. The act of snatching; a quick grasp or grab.
b. Informal A kidnapping.
2. A brief period of time: "At the end we preferred to travel all night, / Sleeping in snatches" (T.S. Eliot).
3. A small amount; a bit or fragment: a snatch of dialogue.
4. Sports A lift in weightlifting in which the weight is raised in one uninterrupted motion from the floor to a position over the lifter's head.
5. Vulgar Slang The vulva.

[Middle English snacchen.]

snatch′er n.

snatch

(snætʃ)
vb
1. (tr) to seize or grasp (something) suddenly or peremptorily: he snatched the chocolate out of my hand.
2. (usually foll by: at) to seize or attempt to seize suddenly
3. (tr) to take hurriedly: to snatch some sleep.
4. (tr) to remove suddenly: she snatched her hand away.
5. (tr) to gain, win, or rescue, esp narrowly: they snatched victory in the closing seconds.
6. (Weightlifting) (tr) (in weightlifting) to lift (a weight) with a snatch
7. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) snatch one's time informal Austral to leave a job, taking whatever pay is due
n
8. an act of snatching
9. a fragment or small incomplete part: snatches of conversation.
10. a brief spell: snatches of time off.
11. (Weightlifting) weightlifting a lift in which the weight is raised in one quick motion from the floor to an overhead position
12. slang chiefly US an act of kidnapping
13. slang Brit a robbery: a diamond snatch.
[C13 snacchen; related to Middle Dutch snakken to gasp, Old Norse snaka to sniff around]
ˈsnatcher n

snatch

(snætʃ)

v.i.
1. to make a sudden effort to seize something, as with the hand; grab (usu. fol. by at).
v.t.
2. to seize by a sudden or hasty grasp: He snatched the woman's purse and ran.
3. to take, pull, etc., suddenly or hastily.
4. Slang. to kidnap.
n.
5. an act or instance of snatching.
6. a sudden motion to seize something.
7. a bit, scrap, or fragment of something: snatches of conversation.
8. a brief spell of effort or activity: to work in snatches.
9. Slang. an act of kidnapping.
10. Weightlifting. a lift in which the barbell is brought in a single motion from the floor to an arms-extended position overhead.
[1175–1225; Middle English snacche (n.), snacchen (v.)]
snatch′er, n.

Snatch

 of robbers—Lipton, 1970.

snatch


Past participle: snatched
Gerund: snatching

Imperative
snatch
snatch
Present
I snatch
you snatch
he/she/it snatches
we snatch
you snatch
they snatch
Preterite
I snatched
you snatched
he/she/it snatched
we snatched
you snatched
they snatched
Present Continuous
I am snatching
you are snatching
he/she/it is snatching
we are snatching
you are snatching
they are snatching
Present Perfect
I have snatched
you have snatched
he/she/it has snatched
we have snatched
you have snatched
they have snatched
Past Continuous
I was snatching
you were snatching
he/she/it was snatching
we were snatching
you were snatching
they were snatching
Past Perfect
I had snatched
you had snatched
he/she/it had snatched
we had snatched
you had snatched
they had snatched
Future
I will snatch
you will snatch
he/she/it will snatch
we will snatch
you will snatch
they will snatch
Future Perfect
I will have snatched
you will have snatched
he/she/it will have snatched
we will have snatched
you will have snatched
they will have snatched
Future Continuous
I will be snatching
you will be snatching
he/she/it will be snatching
we will be snatching
you will be snatching
they will be snatching
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been snatching
you have been snatching
he/she/it has been snatching
we have been snatching
you have been snatching
they have been snatching
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been snatching
you will have been snatching
he/she/it will have been snatching
we will have been snatching
you will have been snatching
they will have been snatching
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been snatching
you had been snatching
he/she/it had been snatching
we had been snatching
you had been snatching
they had been snatching
Conditional
I would snatch
you would snatch
he/she/it would snatch
we would snatch
you would snatch
they would snatch
Past Conditional
I would have snatched
you would have snatched
he/she/it would have snatched
we would have snatched
you would have snatched
they would have snatched
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.snatch - a small fragment; "overheard snatches of their conversation"
fragment - an incomplete piece; "fragments of a play"
2.snatch - obscene terms for female genitalssnatch - obscene terms for female genitals  
female genital organ, female genitalia, female genitals, fanny - external female sex organs; "in England `fanny' is vulgar slang for female genitals"
3.snatch - (law) the unlawful act of capturing and carrying away a person against their will and holding them in false imprisonmentsnatch - (law) the unlawful act of capturing and carrying away a person against their will and holding them in false imprisonment
seizure, capture - the act of taking of a person by force
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
4.snatch - a weightlift in which the barbell is lifted overhead in one rapid motion
weightlift, weightlifting - bodybuilding by exercise that involves lifting weights
5.snatch - the act of catching an object with the handssnatch - the act of catching an object with the hands; "Mays made the catch with his back to the plate"; "he made a grab for the ball before it landed"; "Martin's snatch at the bridle failed and the horse raced away"; "the infielder's snap and throw was a single motion"
touching, touch - the act of putting two things together with no space between them; "at his touch the room filled with lights"
fair catch - (American football) a catch of a punt on the fly by a defensive player who has signalled that he will not run and so should not be tackled
interception - (American football) the act of catching a football by a player on the opposing team
reception - (American football) the act of catching a pass in football; "the tight end made a great reception on the 20 yard line"
rebound - the act of securing possession of the rebounding basketball after a missed shot
shoestring catch - (baseball) a running catch made near the ground
interlock, interlocking, meshing, mesh - the act of interlocking or meshing; "an interlocking of arms by the police held the crowd in check"
Verb1.snatch - to grasp hastily or eagerly; "Before I could stop him the dog snatched the ham bone"
clutch, prehend, seize - take hold of; grab; "The sales clerk quickly seized the money on the counter"; "She clutched her purse"; "The mother seized her child by the arm"; "Birds of prey often seize small mammals"
swoop up, swoop - seize or catch with a swooping motion
2.snatch - to make grasping motions; "the cat snatched at the butterflies"
3.snatch - take away to an undisclosed location against their will and usually in order to extract a ransomsnatch - take away to an undisclosed location against their will and usually in order to extract a ransom; "The industrialist's son was kidnapped"
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
seize - take or capture by force; "The terrorists seized the politicians"; "The rebels threaten to seize civilian hostages"
shanghai, impress - take (someone) against his will for compulsory service, especially on board a ship; "The men were shanghaied after being drugged"

snatch

verb
1. grab, seize, wrench, wrest, take, grip, grasp, clutch, take hold of He snatched the telephone from me.
2. steal, take, nick (slang, chiefly Brit.), pinch (informal), swipe (slang), lift (informal), pilfer, filch, shoplift, thieve, walk or make off with He snatched her bag and threw her to the ground.
3. win, take, score, gain, secure, obtain They snatched a third goal.
4. save, free, rescue, pull, recover, get out, salvage, extricate He was snatched from the jaws of death at the last minute.
noun
1. bit, part, fragment, piece, spell, snippet, smattering I heard snatches of the conversation.

snatch

verb
1. To grasp at (something) eagerly, forcibly, and abruptly with the jaws:
2. To get hold of (something moving):
Informal: nab.
Idiom: lay hands on.
3. To take quick and forcible possession of:
Idiom: help oneself to.
4. To take (another's property) without permission:
Informal: lift, swipe.
5. To seize and detain (a person) unlawfully:
noun
The act of catching, especially a sudden taking and holding:
Translations
إخْتِطاف، إنْتِزاعقِطْعَه مُقْتَطَفَهيَخْتَطِفيَخْتَطِفُيَنْتَهِز فُرْصَه
chňapnoutchňapnutípopadnoutukrást pro sebeúryvek
snuppebrudstykke
siepata
ugrabiti
kapáskapkodkapva kap
glefsa, brotgrípa tækifæriîhrifsaòaî aî hrifsa/òrífa til
ひったくる
낚아채다
bandymas stvertinuotrupapastverti
fragmentskampiensmēģinājums satverttvert
chňapnutieukradnúť pre seba
pograbiti
stjäla
คว้า
kapmakkapmaya çalışmakapmaya çalışmakparçayapıvermek
giật lấy

snatch

[snætʃ]
A. N
1. (= act of snatching) → arrebatamiento m
to make a snatch at sthintentar arrebatar or agarrar algo
2. (= theft) → robo m, hurto m; (= kidnapping) → secuestro m
jewellery snatchrobo m or hurto m de joyas
3. (= snippet) → trocito m
to whistle snatches of Mozartsilbar trocitos de Mozart
snatches of conversationfragmentos mpl de conversación
to sleep in snatchesdormir a ratos
4. (= vagina) → coño m
B. VT
1. (= grab) → arrebatar
to snatch sth from sbarrebatar algo a algn
he snatched the keys from my handme arrebató las llaves de la mano
to snatch a knife out of sb's handarrebatarle or arrancarle un cuchillo a algn de las manos
to snatch a mealcomer a la carrera
to snatch some sleepbuscar tiempo para dormir
to snatch an opportunityasir una ocasión
to snatch an hour of happinessprocurarse (a pesar de todo) una hora de felicidad
2. (= steal) → robar; (= kidnap) → secuestrar
my bag was snatchedme robaron el bolso
C. VI don't snatch!¡no me lo quites!
to snatch at sth (lit, fig) → intentar agarrar algo
D. CPD snatch squad Nunidad f de arresto
snatch away snatch off VT + ADV to snatch sth away from or off sbarrebatar algo a algn
snatch up VT + ADVagarrar (rápidamente)
to snatch up a knifeagarrar un cuchillo
to snatch up a childagarrar a un niño en brazos

snatch

[ˈsnætʃ]
n
(= robbery) → vol m à l'arraché
a bag snatch → un vol de sac à main
(British) a snatch of sth [song] → un fragment de qch
snatches of conversation → des bribes de conversation
vt
(= grab) → saisir (d'un geste vif)
to snatch sth from sb → arracher quelque chose à qn
He snatched the keys from my hand → Il m'a arraché les clés des mains.
(= grab) [+ opportunity, chance] → saisir; [+ victory, goal] → arracher
to snatch a sandwich → manger un sandwich à la hâte, avaler un sandwich à la hâte
to snatch some sleep → arriver à dormir un peu
(= steal) → voler
My bag was snatched → On m'a arraché mon sac.
vi (= grab) don't snatch! → doucement!
snatch up
vt sepsaisir, s'emparer de

snatch

n
(= act)Griff m
(Brit inf: = robbery) → Raub m; (= kidnapping)Entführung f
(= snippet)Stück nt, → Brocken m; (of conversation)Fetzen m; (of music)ein paar Takte; to do something in snatchesetw in Etappen tun
(Weightlifting) → Reißen nt
(US, sl, = female genitals) → Möse f (vulg)
vt
(= grab)greifen; to snatch something from somebodyjdm etw entreißen; to snatch hold of somethingnach etw greifen, etw packen; to snatch something out of somebody’s handjdm etw aus der Hand reißen
some sleep etcergattern; to snatch a quick mealschnell etwas essen; the Ferrari snatched the lead on the last lapder Ferrari riss in der letzten Runde die Führung an sich; to snatch an opportunityeine Gelegenheit ergreifen or beim Schopf packen; they snatched a quick kisssie gaben sich (dat)schnell einen Kuss; he snatched a kiss while she wasn’t lookingals sie gerade wegsah, stahl er ihr schnell einen Kuss; to snatch defeat from the jaws of victoryeinen sicheren Sieg in eine Niederlage verwandeln; they snatched victory from the jaws of defeat with a goal in the last minutemit einem Tor in der letzten Minute konnten sie aus der Niederlage noch einen Sieg machen
(inf) (= steal) moneyklauen (inf); handbagaus der Hand reißen; (= kidnap)entführen
vigreifen (at nach); don’t snatch!nicht grapschen! (inf); to snatch at an opportunitynach einer Gelegenheit greifen

snatch

[snætʃ]
1. n
a. (act of snatching) to make a snatch at sthcercare di afferrare qc
b. (fam) (theft) → furto, rapina; (kidnapping) → rapimento
there was a wages snatch → dei ladri hanno rubato le paghe
c. (snippet) → pezzo
snatches of conversation → frammenti mpl di conversazione
to sleep in snatches → dormire a intervalli
2. vt (grab, object) → strappare con violenza; (opportunity) → cogliere; (few days, short break) → prendersi; (steal, also) (fig) (kiss, victory) → rubare; (kidnap) → rapire
to snatch a sandwich → buttar giù in fretta un panino
to snatch some sleep → riuscire a dormire un po'
to snatch a knife out of sb's hand → strappare di mano un coltello a qn
3. vi don't snatch!non strappare le cose di mano!
to snatch at (object) → cercare di afferrare (opportunity) → cogliere al volo
snatch away vt + adv to snatch sth away from sbstrappare qc a qn
snatch up vt + advraccogliere in fretta, afferrare

snatch

(snӕtʃ) verb
1. to (try to) seize or grab suddenly. The monkey snatched the biscuit out of my hand.
2. to take quickly, when one has time or the opportunity. She managed to snatch an hour's sleep.
noun
1. an attempt to seize. The thief made a snatch at her handbag.
2. a short piece or extract eg from music, conversation etc. a snatch of conversation.

snatch

يَخْتَطِفُ popadnout snuppe schnappen γραπώνω arrebatar siepata attraper ugrabiti strappare ひったくる 낚아채다 rukken snappe (s)chwycić agarrar хватать(ся) stjäla คว้า kapmak giật lấy 攫取
References in classic literature ?
Cheerfully, most cheerfully, will Cora and I keep the vigils, while you and all these brave men endeavor to snatch a little sleep
Beholding it, Hester was constrained to rush towards the child -- to pursue the little elf in the flight which she invariably began -- to snatch her to her bosom with a close pressure and earnest kisses -- not so much from overflowing love as to assure herself that Pearl was flesh and blood, and not utterly delusive.
They are mostly young, of stalwart frames; fellows who have felled forests, and now seek to drop the axe and snatch the whale-lance.
Yet, oh, the great sun is no fixture; and if, at midnight, we would fain snatch some sweet solace from him, we gaze for him in vain
Yes, ma'am," said Topsy, as before;--but we will add, what Miss Ophelia did not see, that, during the time when the good lady's back was turned in the zeal of her manipulations, the young disciple had contrived to snatch a pair of gloves and a ribbon, which she had adroitly slipped into her sleeves, and stood with her hands dutifully folded, as before.
On the 13th of December he sold another horse--said two warn't necessary to drag that old light vehicle with--in fact, one could snatch it along faster than was absolutely necessary, now that it was good solid winter weather and the roads in splendid condition.
Tom sprang at him and drove his pocketknife into him two or three times before the boys could snatch him away and give the wounded lad a chance to escape.
He surveyed the prize; walked around it; smelt at it from a safe distance; walked around it again; grew bolder, and took a closer smell; then lifted his lip and made a gingerly snatch at it, just missing it; made another, and another; began to enjoy the diversion; subsided to his stomach with the beetle between his paws, and continued his experiments; grew weary at last, and then indifferent and absent-minded.
I have had her rush at me with a face made all up of fury, and snatch from me a newspaper, in a manner that fully revealed her apprehension.
I had now got hold of Bessie's hand, and she did not snatch it from me.
I took a seat at the end of the hearthstone opposite that towards which my landlord advanced, and filled up an interval of silence by attempting to caress the canine mother, who had left her nursery, and was sneaking wolfishly to the back of my legs, her lip curled up, and her white teeth watering for a snatch.
She opened the door with an angry snatch at the handle, shut it violently, opened it again, and looked in.