sneak


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Related to sneak: sneak out

sneak

 (snēk)
v. sneaked or snuck (snŭk), sneak·ing, sneaks
v.intr.
1. To go or move in a quiet, stealthy way.
2. To behave in a cowardly or servile manner.
v.tr.
To move, give, take, or put in a quiet, stealthy manner: sneak candy into one's mouth; sneaked a look at the grade sheet.
n.
1. A person regarded as stealthy, cowardly, or underhanded.
2. An instance of sneaking; a quiet, stealthy movement.
3. Informal A sneaker.
adj.
1. Carried out in a clandestine manner: sneak preparations for war.
2. Perpetrated without warning: a sneak attack.

[Probably akin to Middle English sniken, to creep, from Old English snīcan.]
Usage Note: Snuck is an Americanism first introduced in the 1800s as a nonstandard regional variant of sneaked. Snuck probably arose in imitation of the pattern set by stick/stuck and strike/struck. Widespread use of snuck in the United States has become more common with every generation. It is now used by educated speakers in all regions and was acceptable to 75 percent of the Usage Panel in our 2008 survey. This stands in marked contrast to the 67 percent that disapproved of snuck twenty years earlier. The more traditional form sneaked, which predominates in British English, is fully acceptable as well, with 90 percent approving it in 2008.

sneak

(sniːk)
vb
1. (intr; often foll by along, off, in, etc) to move furtively
2. (intr) to behave in a cowardly or underhand manner
3. (tr) to bring, take, or put stealthily
4. (intr) informal chiefly Brit to tell tales (esp in schools)
5. (tr) informal to steal
6. (intr; foll by off, out, away, etc) informal to leave unobtrusively
n
7. a person who acts in an underhand or cowardly manner, esp as an informer
8.
a. a stealthy act or movement
b. (as modifier): a sneak attack.
9. informal Brit an unobtrusive departure
[Old English snīcan to creep; from Old Norse snīkja to hanker after]
ˈsneaky adj
ˈsneakily adv
ˈsneakiness n

sneak

(snik)

v. sneaked or snuck, sneak•ing,
n., adj. v.i.
1. to go in a stealthy or furtive manner; slink; skulk.
2. to act in a furtive or underhand way.
v.t.
3. to move, put, pass, etc., in a stealthy or furtive manner: He sneaked the gun into his pocket.
4. to do, take, or have hurriedly or surreptitiously: to sneak a cigarette.
n.
5. a sneaking, underhand, or contemptible person.
6. a stealthy or furtive departure.
adj.
8. stealthy; surreptitious: a sneak raid.
[1590–1600; obscurely akin to Middle English sniken, Old English snīcan to creep, c. Old Norse snīkja to hanker after]
syn: See lurk.
usage: First recorded in writing near the end of the 19th century in the U.S., snuck has become in recent decades a standard variant past tense and past participle: Bored by the lecture, we snuck out the side door. snuck occurs frequently in fiction, in journalism, and on radio and television, whereas sneaked is more likely in highly formal or belletristic writing. snuck is the only spoken past tense and past participle for many younger and middle-aged persons of all educational levels in the U.S. and Canada. It has occasionally been considered nonstandard but is so widely used by professional writers and educated speakers that it can no longer be so regarded.

sneak


Past participle: sneaked
Gerund: sneaking

Imperative
sneak
sneak
Present
I sneak
you sneak
he/she/it sneaks
we sneak
you sneak
they sneak
Preterite
I sneaked
you sneaked
he/she/it sneaked
we sneaked
you sneaked
they sneaked
Present Continuous
I am sneaking
you are sneaking
he/she/it is sneaking
we are sneaking
you are sneaking
they are sneaking
Present Perfect
I have sneaked
you have sneaked
he/she/it has sneaked
we have sneaked
you have sneaked
they have sneaked
Past Continuous
I was sneaking
you were sneaking
he/she/it was sneaking
we were sneaking
you were sneaking
they were sneaking
Past Perfect
I had sneaked
you had sneaked
he/she/it had sneaked
we had sneaked
you had sneaked
they had sneaked
Future
I will sneak
you will sneak
he/she/it will sneak
we will sneak
you will sneak
they will sneak
Future Perfect
I will have sneaked
you will have sneaked
he/she/it will have sneaked
we will have sneaked
you will have sneaked
they will have sneaked
Future Continuous
I will be sneaking
you will be sneaking
he/she/it will be sneaking
we will be sneaking
you will be sneaking
they will be sneaking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been sneaking
you have been sneaking
he/she/it has been sneaking
we have been sneaking
you have been sneaking
they have been sneaking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been sneaking
you will have been sneaking
he/she/it will have been sneaking
we will have been sneaking
you will have been sneaking
they will have been sneaking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been sneaking
you had been sneaking
he/she/it had been sneaking
we had been sneaking
you had been sneaking
they had been sneaking
Conditional
I would sneak
you would sneak
he/she/it would sneak
we would sneak
you would sneak
they would sneak
Past Conditional
I would have sneaked
you would have sneaked
he/she/it would have sneaked
we would have sneaked
you would have sneaked
they would have sneaked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sneak - a person who is regarded as underhanded and furtive and contemptible
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable
2.sneak - someone who prowls or sneaks aboutsneak - someone who prowls or sneaks about; usually with unlawful intentions
interloper, intruder, trespasser - someone who intrudes on the privacy or property of another without permission
3.sneak - someone acting as an informer or decoy for the police
betrayer, blabber, informer, squealer, rat - one who reveals confidential information in return for money
Verb1.sneak - to go stealthily or furtively; "..stead of sneaking around spying on the neighbor's house"
walk - use one's feet to advance; advance by steps; "Walk, don't run!"; "We walked instead of driving"; "She walks with a slight limp"; "The patient cannot walk yet"; "Walk over to the cabinet"
slip away, sneak away, sneak off, sneak out, steal away - leave furtively and stealthily; "The lecture was boring and many students slipped out when the instructor turned towards the blackboard"
2.sneak - put, bring, or take in a secretive or furtive manner; "sneak a look"; "sneak a cigarette"
act, move - perform an action, or work out or perform (an action); "think before you act"; "We must move quickly"; "The governor should act on the new energy bill"; "The nanny acted quickly by grabbing the toddler and covering him with a wet towel"
3.sneak - make off with belongings of otherssneak - make off with belongings of others  
steal - take without the owner's consent; "Someone stole my wallet on the train"; "This author stole entire paragraphs from my dissertation"
4.sneak - pass on stealthily; "He slipped me the key when nobody was looking"
hand, pass on, turn over, pass, reach, give - place into the hands or custody of; "hand me the spoon, please"; "Turn the files over to me, please"; "He turned over the prisoner to his lawyers"
Adj.1.sneak - marked by quiet and caution and secrecy; taking pains to avoid being observed; "a furtive manner"; "a sneak attack"; "stealthy footsteps"; "a surreptitious glance at his watch"
concealed - hidden on any grounds for any motive; "a concealed weapon"; "a concealed compartment in his briefcase"

sneak

verb
1. slink, slip, steal, creep, ghost, pad, tiptoe, sidle, skulk Don't sneak away and hide.
2. slip, smuggle, spirit He snuck me a cigarette.
3. snatch, steal, do something furtively or stealthily She sneaked a look at her watch.
noun
1. informer, grass (Brit. slang), betrayer, telltale, squealer (slang), Judas, accuser, stool pigeon, snake in the grass, nark (Brit., Austral., & N.Z. slang) He is disloyal, distrustful and a sneak.
adjective
1. secret, quick, clandestine, furtive, stealthy We can give you this exclusive sneak preview.
sneak up on something or someone creep up on, take by surprise, tiptoe up on I managed to sneak up on him.

sneak

verb
1. To move silently and furtively:
Slang: gumshoe.
2. To bring in or take out secretly:
noun
One who behaves in a stealthy, furtive way:
Translations
إخْتَلَسَ، نَشَلَ، سَرَقَإنْسَلَّ، تَسَلَّلَخائِن، وَغْد
donašečplížit setajně vzít
listesladrehanksnige
hiipiähiippailijahiippaillahiipparihiiviskellä
settenkedikspicli
hnuplalæîastlæîupoki; kjaftaskjóîa
įsėlintipasalūniškassportiniai bateliaiveikimas iš pasalų
ielavītieslavītieslīdējsnočieptsūdzībnieks
donášačtajne vziať
odtihotapiti sepritihotapiti se
smyga
fitneci kimsegizlice almaksinsice sokulmak

sneak

[sniːk]
A. VT to sneak sth out of a placesacar algo furtivamente de un lugar
I managed to sneak one inlogré meter uno sin ser visto
to sneak a look at sthmirar algo de reojo or soslayo
B. VI
1. to sneak aboutir a hurtadillas, moverse furtivamente
to sneak in/outentrar/salir a hurtadillas
to sneak away or offescabullirse
to sneak off with sthllevarse algo furtivamente
to sneak up on sbacercarse sigilosamente a algn
2. to sneak on sbdelatar a algn, dar el soplo sobre algn, chivarse de algn (Sp)
to sneak to the teacherir con el cuento or (Sp) chivarse al profesor
C. N (= tale-teller) → chivato/a m/f, soplón/ona m/f
D. CPD sneak preview N [of film] → preestreno m; (gen) → anticipo m no autorizado
sneak thief Nratero/a m/f
sneak visit Nvisita f furtiva

sneak

[ˈsniːk]
vi
to sneak in → entrer furtivement
to sneak out → sortir furtivement
to sneak up on sb → s'approcher de qn sans faire de bruit
vt
to sneak a look at sth → regarder furtivement qch

sneak

nSchleicher(in) m(f); (dated Brit Sch inf) → Petzer m, → Petze f (Sch inf)
vt he sneaked a cake off the counterer klaute or stibitzte einen Kuchen vom Tresen (inf); to sneak something into a roometw in ein Zimmer schmuggeln; to sneak a look at somebody/somethingauf jdn/etw schielen
vi
to sneak aboutherumschleichen; to sneak away or offsich wegschleichen or -stehlen; to sneak insich einschleichen; to sneak past somebody(sich) an jdm vorbeischleichen; to sneak up on somebodysich an jdn heranschleichen
(dated Brit Sch inf: = tell tales) → petzen (inf); to sneak on somebodyjdn verpetzen (inf)

sneak

[sniːk]
1. vt to sneak sth out of a placeportare fuori qc di nascosto da un luogo
to sneak a look at sth → dare una sbirciatina a qc
to sneak a quick cigarette → fumarsi una sigaretta di nascosto
2. vi
a. to sneak in/outentrare/uscire di nascosto or di soppiatto
to sneak away or off → allontanarsi di nascosto or di soppiatto, squagliarsela
to sneak off with sth → portare via di soppiatto qc
b. to sneak on sb (fam) → fare la spia a qn
3. n (fam) (telltale) → spione/a

sneak

(sniːk) verb
1. to go quietly and secretly, especially for a dishonest purpose. He must have sneaked into my room when no-one was looking and stolen the money.
2. to take secretly. He sneaked the letter out of her drawer.
noun
a mean, deceitful person, especially a telltale.
ˈsneakers noun plural
soft shoes with soles made of rubber, rope etc. He was wearing blue jeans and sneakers.
ˈsneaking adjective
(of a feeling) slight but not easy to suppress. She knew he was wicked but she had a sneaking admiration for his courage.
ˈsneaky adjective
It was a bit sneaky of him to tell the teacher about me.
ˈsneakiness noun
References in classic literature ?
But I am going now to keep a sharp look-out on him; and if I see anything very suspicious going on, I'll just take him by the nape of his neck, and say --Look here, Beelzebub, you don't do it; and if he makes any fuss, by the Lord I'll make a grab into his pocket for his tail, take it to the capstan, and give him such a wrenching and heaving, that his tail will come short off at the stump --do you see; and then, I rather guess when he finds himself docked in that queer fashion, he'll sneak off without the poor satisfaction of feeling his tail between his legs.
They would come in crowds and fill themselves with a fine dinner, and then sneak off.
And your `gettin' religion,' as you call it, arter all, is too p'isin mean for any crittur;--run up a bill with the devil all your life, and then sneak out when pay time comes
Well, the funeral sermon was very good, but pison long and tiresome; and then the king he shoved in and got off some of his usual rubbage, and at last the job was through, and the undertaker begun to sneak up on the coffin with his screw-driver.
The laughed at him, and called him coward, liar, sneak, and other sorts of pet names, and told him they meant to call Chambers by a new name after this, and make it common in the town--"Tom Driscoll's nigger pappy,"--to signify that he had had a second birth into this life, and that Chambers was the author of his new being.
If I go a step further, and see him on board ship with my own eyes, he'll slip off in the pilot's boat, and sneak back secretly to you.
No, gentlemen; he'll always show 'em a clean pair of heels very early in the scuffle, and sneak away.
Steerforth said there was nothing of the sneak in Traddles, and we all felt that to be the highest praise.
Pay my bill and sneak off at once to the next town; but how pass through the grinning line of boots, and waiter, and chambermaid, and ironically respectful landlord and landlady, in the hall .
If you don't sign after me, you are a sneak, Chester," said Sir Charles.
My lady, who was riding behind him, said to him in a low voice, 'What are you about, you sneak, don't you see that I am here?
The most pressing business was to go home and tell his daughter that Freely was a poor sneak, probably a rascal, and that her engagement was broken off.