snitch line

snitch line

n
(Law) Canadian a direct telephone or other communications link set up to allow people to report neighbours, colleagues, etc suspected of wrongdoing
References in periodicals archive ?
3, 1995, at D1 ("'It sounds like a snitch line to me,' said Ron A.
Mainstream society's dissatisfaction with these programs, expressed in the harsh language of disloyalty, suggests discomfort with the snitch lines themselves, as well as the criminalization of the relatively minor offenses that they target.
Third, lawmakers should curtail the use of initiatives, often criticized as snitch lines, that encourage civilians to report minor crimes, and consider decriminalizing some minor regulatory-type offenses.
First, legislators and police should curtail programs, like snitch lines for water-use offenses, that encourage civilians to inform on those who commit minor violations.
Earlier this month, the White House unveiled a new section of its website called "Reality Check," which retails stale Obama talking points on healthcare and also included a snitch line for Obama supporters to inform the White House on opponents of Obamacare.
The obvious concern is that the new snitch line will enable the Obama administration to build an "enemies list," just as Richard Nixon did during his stay in the White House.
The problem with Obama's snitch line is that it violates the federal Privacy Act of 1974, which Congress passed in an attempt to avoid another Nixon-style "enemies list.
There is only one way to tackle those people who exaggerate personal injury claims - call the snitch line set up to stop them.
The 1890 333 100 snitch line opened at 8am yesterday and it received its first call within an hour.
On the other hand, the very nature of open source software eliminates software piracy and measures necessary to enforce licensing (such as activation, snitch lines and forced audits).