snitch

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snitch

 (snĭch) Slang
v. snitched, snitch·ing, snitch·es
v.intr.
To act as an informer: He snitched on his comrades.
v.tr.
To steal (something, usually something of little value); pilfer: snitched a cookie from the counter.
n.
1. An informer.
2. A thief.

[Origin unknown.]

snitch′er n.

snitch

(snɪtʃ)
vb
1. (tr) to steal; take, esp in an underhand way
2. (intr) to act as an informer
n
3. an informer; telltale
4. (Anatomy) the nose
[C17: of unknown origin]
ˈsnitcher n

snitch1

(snɪtʃ)

v.t.
Informal. to snatch or steal; pilfer.
[1900–05, Amer.; perhaps alter. of snatch]

snitch2

(snɪtʃ)

v.i. Informal.
1. to turn informer; tattle.
n.
2. an informer.
[1775–85; orig. uncertain]

snitch


Past participle: snitched
Gerund: snitching

Imperative
snitch
snitch
Present
I snitch
you snitch
he/she/it snitches
we snitch
you snitch
they snitch
Preterite
I snitched
you snitched
he/she/it snitched
we snitched
you snitched
they snitched
Present Continuous
I am snitching
you are snitching
he/she/it is snitching
we are snitching
you are snitching
they are snitching
Present Perfect
I have snitched
you have snitched
he/she/it has snitched
we have snitched
you have snitched
they have snitched
Past Continuous
I was snitching
you were snitching
he/she/it was snitching
we were snitching
you were snitching
they were snitching
Past Perfect
I had snitched
you had snitched
he/she/it had snitched
we had snitched
you had snitched
they had snitched
Future
I will snitch
you will snitch
he/she/it will snitch
we will snitch
you will snitch
they will snitch
Future Perfect
I will have snitched
you will have snitched
he/she/it will have snitched
we will have snitched
you will have snitched
they will have snitched
Future Continuous
I will be snitching
you will be snitching
he/she/it will be snitching
we will be snitching
you will be snitching
they will be snitching
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been snitching
you have been snitching
he/she/it has been snitching
we have been snitching
you have been snitching
they have been snitching
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been snitching
you will have been snitching
he/she/it will have been snitching
we will have been snitching
you will have been snitching
they will have been snitching
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been snitching
you had been snitching
he/she/it had been snitching
we had been snitching
you had been snitching
they had been snitching
Conditional
I would snitch
you would snitch
he/she/it would snitch
we would snitch
you would snitch
they would snitch
Past Conditional
I would have snitched
you would have snitched
he/she/it would have snitched
we would have snitched
you would have snitched
they would have snitched
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.snitch - someone acting as an informer or decoy for the police
betrayer, blabber, informer, squealer, rat - one who reveals confidential information in return for money
Verb1.snitch - take by theft; "Someone snitched my wallet!"
steal - take without the owner's consent; "Someone stole my wallet on the train"; "This author stole entire paragraphs from my dissertation"
2.snitch - give away information about somebodysnitch - give away information about somebody; "He told on his classmate who had cheated on the exam"
inform - impart knowledge of some fact, state or affairs, or event to; "I informed him of his rights"
sell out - give information that compromises others

snitch

verb
1. Slang. To take (another's property) without permission:
Informal: lift, swipe.
Slang: cop, heist, hook, nip, pinch, rip off.
2. Slang. To give incriminating information about others, especially to the authorities:
inform, talk, tattle, tip (off).
Informal: fink.
Slang: rat, sing, squeal, stool.
noun
Slang. One who gives incriminating information about others:
Informal: rat, tipster.
Translations
ilmiantajakähveltääkannellakieliäpihistää
skvallrasnotjalla

snitch

[snɪtʃ]
A. VI to snitch on sbchivarse or soplar a algn
B. VT (= steal) → birlar
C. N
1. (= nose) → napias fpl
2. (= informer) → soplón/ona m/f

snitch

[ˈsnɪtʃ]
vi (= tell) → cafter
to snitch on sb → cafter qn
n (= telltale) → cafteur/euse m/f

snitch

(inf)
vtklauen (inf)
vi to snitch on somebodyüber jdn plaudern (inf)or klatschen

snitch

[snɪtʃ] (fam)
1. vi (inform) to snitch on sbfare la spia a qn
2. vt (steal) → sgraffignare
References in periodicals archive ?
A TEENAGE girl arranged the rape of a schoolgirl in an alleyway as punishment for snitching, a court has heard.
The prosecutor (Susan Sarandon) offers him the chance to avoid 10 years in jail by snitching on those higher up the food chain.
And one of the leading causes for the pipeline of nonviolent drug offenders into the prison system is mandatory minimum sentencing and snitching.
Odd as it may sound, Texas is at the vanguard of snitch testimony," said Alexandra Natapoff, a law professor at Loyola Law School Los Angeles, and author of the Snitching Blog.
9) T-shirts featuring slogans like, "Stop Snitching," are sold in shops and online and banned in courts, (10) and defendants have been convicted of witness tampering for the threat implicit in the phrase, "snitches get stitches.
The use of criminal informants is most common in drug enforcement, which relies on snitching at every stage of the legal process, from investigations to arrests to plea bargaining to sentencing.
of Birmingham) concludes that snitching is a state activity to be feared because of the existing lack of limitations and transparency.
The chapter on Baltimore, tracing the origins of the explosive initial Stop Snitching DVD, is especially fascinating and reads like a plot from an episode of The Wire.
This world has an amount of people who got that `stop snitching motto,' but put their life on the line to spend in jail and they are singing like a robin on a nice summer morning.
She is however fighting an attraction to Dave the Laugh as well, while keeping busy playing pranks (such as releasing the biology class's locusts in the caretaker's shack), visiting Paris with her classmates, bravely snitching on a group of bullies at schools, being a hockey captain, and keeping her wildcat Angus from terrorizing the neighborhood even more than usual.
has created E-Snitch, an electronic snitching device that uses wireless networks and satellites to locate missing or stolen computers anywhere in the world within a five-foot radius of the stolen PC.
James Alan Fox, a professor of criminology at Northeastern University, says the attitude on snitching is shifting for the better.