snobbish


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snob·bish

 (snŏb′ĭsh)
adj.
Of, befitting, or resembling a snob; pretentious.

snob′bish·ly adv.
snob′bish·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.snobbish - befitting or characteristic of those who incline to social exclusiveness and who rebuff the advances of people considered inferior
private - confined to particular persons or groups or providing privacy; "a private place"; "private discussions"; "private lessons"; "a private club"; "a private secretary"; "private property"; "the former President is now a private citizen"; "public figures struggle to maintain a private life"

snobbish

adjective superior, arrogant, stuck-up (informal), patronizing, condescending, snooty (informal), pretentious, uppity, high and mighty (informal), toffee-nosed (slang, chiefly Brit.), hoity-toity (informal), high-hat (informal, chiefly U.S.), uppish (Brit. informal) I'd expected her to be snobbish but she was warm and friendly.
modest, humble, down to earth, unassuming, natural, unpretentious, without airs, unostentatious

snobbish

adjective
Characteristic of or resembling a snob:
Translations
مُتَكَبِّر، نَفّاج، مَزْهُوٌّ بِنَفْسِه
povýšenecký
sznob
snobbaîur
povýšenecký
züppemsi

snobbish

[ˈsnɒbɪʃ] ADJsnob, esnob

snobbish

[ˈsnɒbɪʃ] adjsnob inv

snobbish

adjsnobistisch, versnobt (inf); placefür Snobs; to be snobbish about somethingbei etw wählerisch sein

snobbish

[ˈsnɒbɪʃ] adjsnob inv

snob

(snob) noun
a person who admires people of high rank or social class, and despises those in a lower class etc than himself. Being a snob, he was always trying to get to know members of the royal family.
ˈsnobbery noun
behaviour, talk etc that is typical of a snob. She couldn't bear her mother's snobbery.
ˈsnobbish adjective
She always had a snobbish desire to live in an area of expensive housing.
ˈsnobbishly adverb
ˈsnobbishness noun
References in classic literature ?
I am not snobbish," said Gertrude, " although I do not choose to make friends with everyone.
He was shamefully idle, spiritless, sensual, snobbish.
She wasn't necessarily snobbish, unless it was snobbish to want the best.
He glanced around him; but the girl had already gone over to soothe and comfort her father, for her natural affection for his person was as strong or stronger than her somewhat snobbish pride in his success.
Society is hopelessly snobbish, and this fact of your extraction may make an appreciable difference to its acceptance of you as my wife, after I have made you the well-read woman that I mean to make you.
Serious men thaw and become mildly cheerful, and snobbish young men of the heavy-mustache type forget to make themselves objectionable.
They had even managed to avoid May's English aunt, the banker's wife, who was still in Yorkshire; in fact, they had purposely postponed going to London till the autumn in order that their arrival during the season might not appear pushing and snobbish to these unknown relatives.
He was shy as "a wild mountain colt" and somewhat snobbish, and at first was most unpopular.
To define it was difficult, but Margaret knew what it was not: it was not snobbish.
Before Mr Swiveller could make any reply, Mr Chuckster took occasion to enter his indignant protest against this form of inquiry; which he held to be of a disrespectful and snobbish tendency, inasmuch as the inquirer, seeing two gentlemen then and there present, should have spoken of the other gentleman; or rather
Darcy arrive in town, the shy and beautiful Jane falls in love for Mr Bingley, and Lizzie finds Mr Darcy a snobbish and proud man, and she swears to loathe him forever.
Customers see wine as a snobbish area but Majestic isn't a snobbish company at all," he added.