snow


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Related to snow: snow report

snow

 (snō)
n.
1. Frozen precipitation consisting of hexagonally symmetrical ice crystals that form soft, white flakes.
2. A falling of snow; a snowstorm.
3. Something resembling snow, as:
a. The white specks on a television screen resulting from weak reception.
b. Slang Cocaine.
c. Slang Heroin.
v. snowed, snow·ing, snows
v.intr.
To fall as or in snow.
v.tr.
1. To cover, shut off, or close off with snow: We were snowed in.
2. Slang To overwhelm with insincere talk, especially with flattery.
Phrasal Verb:
snow under
1. To overwhelm: I was snowed under with work.
2. To defeat by a very large margin.

[Middle English, from Old English snāw; see sneigwh- in Indo-European roots.]

Snow

(snəʊ)
n
(Biography) C(harles) P(ercy), Baron. 1905–80, British novelist and physicist. His novels include the series Strangers and Brothers (1949–70)

Snow

(snəʊ)
n
(Biography) C(harles) P(ercy), Baron. 1905–80, British novelist and physicist. His novels include the series Strangers and Brothers (1949–70)

snow

(snoʊ)

n.
1.
a. precipitation in the form of hexagonal crystals of ice, usu. grouped together as snowflakes, formed directly from water vapor freezing in air.
b. these flakes as forming a layer on the ground.
c. the fall of these flakes or a storm during which they fall.
2. something resembling a layer of these flakes in whiteness, softness, or the like.
3. Literary.
a. white blossoms.
b. the white color of snow.
4. Slang. cocaine or heroin.
5. white spots or bands on a television screen caused by a weak signal.
v.i.
6. (of snow) to fall: It snowed heavily last night.
7. to descend like snow.
v.t.
8. to let fall as or like snow.
9. to cover, obstruct, confine, etc., with or as if with snow: The town was snowed in by the storm.
10. Slang. to persuade or deceive by insincere talk or flattery.
11. snow under,
a. to cover with or bury in snow.
b. to overwhelm.
c. to defeat overwhelmingly.
[before 900; (n.) Middle English; Old English snāw, c. Old Frisian snē, Old Saxon, Old High German snēo, Old Norse snǣr, Gothic snaiws, Latin nix, Greek níps, Old Church Slavonic sněgŭ]

snow

(snō)
Crystals of ice that form from water vapor in the atmosphere and fall to earth.

snow

- Technically a mineral, it is Teutonic in origin, from an Indo-European root shared by the Latin words niv-/nix and Greek nipha; the spelling snow first appeared in English around 1200.
See also related terms for mineral.

Snow


a mania for snow.
an abnormal fear or dislike of snow.

Snow

 

See Also: NATURE, WEATHER

  1. Big flakes … floating like parachutes in the still air —Frank Ross
  2. Drifts [of snow] heaping themselves like scaling-ladders against the walls —O. Henry
  3. (Those) drifts of soft snow looked like featherbeds —Scott Spencer
  4. A dry pellety snow hitting the sidewalk like uncooked grains of rice —Marge Piercy
  5. Falling snow … sinking into the ground as slowly as breadcrumbs thrown to fishes sink through water —Boris Pasternak
  6. The fine snow had melted (on his hair and his eyelashes) and sparkled now like raindrops in a sunshower —Harvey Swados
  7. Flakes … bob and sail like moths across the driveway —Anon
  8. The flakes fall like asterisks —James Reiss
  9. Flakes of snow … falling like feathers from the sky —Grimm Brothers
  10. The flakes … seemed thick as tarts —Peter De Vries
  11. Flakes swarming around the streetlamps like soft, huge moths —George Garrett
  12. The flakes were as large as an hour’s circular tatting —O. Henry

    The comparison is a vivid one but with tatting no longer a familiar pastime, a brief explanation would be needed for any but needlework aficionados.

  13. Flakes were like feathers —Frank Swinnerton
  14. (The sundial was) heaped with a foot-high frosting of snow like a tall, fantastic cake —Davis Grubb
  15. (Snow was still falling,) heavy flakes like goose feathers —Jilly Cooper
  16. (A row of) icicles like the crystal drops of a chandelier hung from the roof —H. E. Bates
  17. Icicles like the teeth of fish —Saul Bellow
  18. Icicles sparkling at the eaves like pendant blades of glass —William Styron
  19. It [snow] fell like a great armistice, bringing all simple struggles to an end —Elizabeth Hardwick
  20. It looks pretty in the garden [in the snow], like a living Christmas —Janet Flanner
  21. A light fringe of snow lay like a cape on the shoulders of his overcoat and like toecaps on the toes of his galoshes —James Joyce
  22. Lightly and whitely as wheat from the grain, thickly and quickly as thoughts through the brain, so fast and so dumb do the snowflakes come —Grace Denio Lichtfield
  23. Like an army defeated, the snow has retreated —William Wordsworth
  24. Long icicles, like crystal daggers —Oscar Wilde
  25. (I looked down at the street … at the) masses of snow like dirty suds —Saul Bellow
  26. Melted [snow], leaving the gray grass like a pallet, closely pressed —Wallace Stevens
  27. One of those brilliant, glittery snows that ought to emit some glorious sound with each crystal falling to earth, something transcendent like a Bach cantata —Lynne Sharon Schwartz

    The musical comparison is particularly appropriate to the novel, Disturbances in the Field, in which it appeared, as its main character is a classical musician.

  28. The pilings of snow were like the white waves of a white sea —Truman Capote
  29. (Her feet disperse the) powdery snow, that rises up like smoke —William Wordsworth
  30. Snow as smooth to see as cake frosting and as light as powder —Ernest Hemingway
  31. The snow at the roadside full of bubbles like white of egg beaten up —Joyce Cary
  32. The snow began to spill down like quiet feathers —H. E. Bates
  33. The snow came down last night like moths —Richard Wilbur

    A simile to begin a poem entitled First Snow in Alsace.

  34. Snow … came in thick tufts like new wool, washed before the weaver spins it —Leslie Silko
  35. Snow … comes down like lace —Marge Piercy
  36. Snow … decking the fields and trees with white as for a fairy wedding —Jerome K. Jerome
  37. Snow … driving him like a fusillade of frozen needles —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  38. Snow fell in swift spirals, floating like gulls into the tree branches —Jean Stafford
  39. Snowflakes dove at our window like fat moths —Donald McCaig
  40. Snowflakes grew bigger and bigger, till at last they looked like big white chickens —Hans Christian Andersen
  41. Snowflakes … large as white carnations —Janet Flanner
  42. Snow flakes shone like silver —Hugh Walpole
  43. Snowflakes sifting like crumbs into the yard —Paul Theroux
  44. The [blindingly thick] snowflakes tormented him like a swarm of silver bees —G. K. Chesterton
  45. The snow [during snow storm] flapped like an endless white blanket —Scott Spencer
  46. Snow flying quick as thought —Adrienne Rich
  47. Snow had begun to fall. It made the sidewalk a spotted hide, like leopard skin —Rosellen Brown
  48. Snow had fallen like a fine dust —Martin Cruz Smith
  49. The snow is now coming like dollar-sized confetti —John Wainwright
  50. Snow … it’s like inebriation because it’s very pleasing when it’s coming, but very unpleasant when it’s going —Ogden Nash
  51. The snow lay soft like a down pillow —Thomas Mann
  52. Snow lies like a down mattress over the earth —Lu Hsün
  53. Snow … lighted the streets like moonlight —Jean Stafford
  54. Snow, like sheep’s wool, only whiter —Gillian Tindall
  55. The snow like the fuzz the morning after too much Stolichnaya —Derek Lambert

    Lambert’s suspense novel, The Red House, is set in Russia and so the reference to a Russian drink.

  56. Snow poured down like salt —Helen Hudson
  57. Snow … settling like wool on the unmown grass —H. E. Bates
  58. Snow smooth as the sky can shed —William Wordsworth
  59. Snow … soft as froth and easy as ashes —W. R. Rodgers
  60. Snow sparkles like eyesight falling to earth —Wallace Stevens
  61. Snow was falling in larger flakes, like a multitude of frozen moths —Ellen Glasgow
  62. The snow was yellow … with orange seeping into its honey color like an aftertaste at sunset —Boris Pasternak
  63. Snow will settle like a sheet over all live color —Frank O’Hara

snow


Past participle: snowed
Gerund: snowing

Imperative
snow
snow
Present
it snows
Preterite
it snowed
Present Continuous
it is snowing
Present Perfect
it has snowed
Past Continuous
it was snowing
Past Perfect
it had snowed
Future
it will snow
Future Perfect
it will have snowed
Future Continuous
it will be snowing
Present Perfect Continuous
it has been snowing
Future Perfect Continuous
it will have been snowing
Past Perfect Continuous
it had been snowing
Conditional
it would snow
Past Conditional
it would have snowed

snow

Precipitation falling from clouds where the temperature is below 32°F (0°C).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.snow - precipitation falling from clouds in the form of ice crystalssnow - precipitation falling from clouds in the form of ice crystals
downfall, precipitation - the falling to earth of any form of water (rain or snow or hail or sleet or mist)
snow flurry, flurry - a light brief snowfall and gust of wind (or something resembling that); "he had to close the window against the flurries"; "there was a flurry of chicken feathers"
whiteout - an arctic atmospheric condition with clouds over snow produce a uniform whiteness and objects are difficult to see; occurs when the light reflected off the snow equals the light coming through the clouds
flake, snowflake - a crystal of snow
2.snow - a layer of snowflakes (white crystals of frozen water) covering the ground
snowball - snow pressed into a ball for throwing (playfully)
layer - a relatively thin sheetlike expanse or region lying over or under another
flake, snowflake - a crystal of snow
corn snow - granular snow formed by alternate thawing and freezing
crud - heavy wet snow that is unsuitable for skiing
3.Snow - English writer of novels about moral dilemmas in academe (1905-1980)
4.snow - street names for cocaine
cocain, cocaine - a narcotic (alkaloid) extracted from coca leaves; used as a surface anesthetic or taken for pleasure; can become powerfully addictive
Verb1.snow - fall as snow; "It was snowing all night"
come down, precipitate, fall - fall from clouds; "rain, snow and sleet were falling"; "Vesuvius precipitated its fiery, destructive rage on Herculaneum"
2.snow - conceal one's true motives from especially by elaborately feigning good intentions so as to gain an end; "He bamboozled his professors into thinking that he knew the subject well"
deceive, lead astray, betray - cause someone to believe an untruth; "The insurance company deceived me when they told me they were covering my house"

snow

noun snowflakes, blizzard, snowfall, snowstorm, sleet, snowdrift They tramped through the falling snow.
Related words
adjective niveous
like chionomania
fear chionophobia
Translations
ثَلْجيَسقُطُ الْثَلْجُتُثْلِج، يَتَساقَط الثَّلْج
сняг
sníhsněžitsnežit
sne
neĝineĝo
lumi
lumilumisadelumivalkoinenpyrysataa lunta
हिमपात
snijegsniježiti
havazik
salju
snjóasnjórsnjókoma
雪が降る
눈이 내리다
nix
sniegassnieglentėsniego baltumosniego gniūžtėsnieguotas
sniegssnigt
snehsnežiť
snegsnežiti
snösnöamyrornas krig
หิมะหิมะตก
сніг
tuyếttuyết rơi

snow

[snəʊ]
A. N
1. (Met) → nieve f
white as snowblanco como la nieve
2. (on TV screen) → lluvia f, nieve f
3. (= cocaine) → nieve f, cocaína f
B. VT
1. (Met) to be snowed in or upquedar aislado por la nieve
2. (fig) to be snowed under with workestar agobiado de trabajo
3. (US) (= charm glibly) to snow sbcamelar a algn
C. VInevar
it's snowingestá nevando
D. CPD snow blindness N (Med) → ceguera f de nieve
snow cap Ncasquete m de nieve, corona f de nieve
snow goose Nánsar m nival
snow leopard Nonza f
snow line Nlímite m de las nieves perpetuas
snow machine Ncañón m de nieve artificial
Snow Queen NReina f de las nieves
snow report N (Met) → informe m sobre el estado de la nieve
snow tyre, snow tire (US) Nneumático m antideslizante
Snow White NBlancanieves f
"Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs""Blancanieves y los siete enanitos"
see also snow-white

snow

[ˈsnəʊ]
nneige f
vineiger
It's snowing → Il neige.

snow

n
Schnee m; (= snowfall)Schneefall m; new snowNeuschnee m; the snows that lie on the plainsder Schnee in der Ebene; the heavy snows last winterdie heftigen Schneefälle im letzten Winter; as white as snowschneeweiß, blütenweiß; as pure as the driven snowengelrein
(TV) → Geflimmer nt, → Schnee m
(sl: = cocaine or heroin) → Schnee m (inf)
vischneien

snow

:
snowball
nSchneeball m; (= drink)Snowball m; he doesn’t stand a snow’s chance in hell (Brit inf) → seine Chancen sind gleich null
vtSchneebälle werfen auf (+acc)
vieskalieren; we must take action now otherwise things will snow and get out of controlwir müssen jetzt etwas unternehmen, sonst wachsen uns die Dinge über den Kopf; opposition to the referendum just snoweddie Opposition gegen die Volksabstimmung wuchs lawinenartig an
snowball effect
nSchneeballeffekt m
snow bank
n (esp US) → Schneeverwehung f, → Schneewehe f
snow-blind
adjschneeblind
snow blindness
nSchneeblindheit f
snow-blower
nSchneefräse f
snowboard
nSnowboard nt
snowboarder
nSnowboarder(in) m(f)
snowboarding
nSnowboarding nt, → Snowboardfahren nt
snowbound
adjeingeschneit
snow cannon
n (Ski) → Schneekanone f
snowcapped
snowcat
n (Ski) → Pistenwalze f
snow chains
plSchneeketten pl
snow-clad (poet), snow-covered
adjverschneit
snow-cuffs
plSchneegamaschen pl
snowdrift
nSchneewehe f
snowdrop
snowfall
nSchneefall m
snowfield
nSchneefeld nt
snowflake
nSchneeflocke f
snow goggles
plSchneebrille f
snow goose
nSchneegans f
snow guard
n (on roof) → Schneefang m
snow-in-summer
n (Bot) → Hornkraut nt
snow job
n (inf)freundliches Gerede; to do a snow on somebodyjdn einzuwickeln versuchen (inf pej)
snow leopard
nSchneeleopard m
snow line
nSchneegrenze f
snowman
snowmobile
nSchneemobil nt
snowplough, (US) snowplow
n (also Ski) → Schneepflug m
snowshed
n (US) → Schneedach nt
snowshoe
nSchneeschuh m
snowslide
n (US) → Schneerutsch m
snowstorm
nSchneesturm m
snowsuit
snow tyre, (US) snow tire
nWinterreifen m
Snow White
snow-white
adjschneeweiß; hair, beard alsoschlohweiß

snow

[snəʊ]
1. n
a.neve f (also snowfall) → nevicata (fam) (cocaine) → neve
b. (on TV screen) → effetto neve
2. vt to be snowed in or upessere isolato/a a causa della neve
to be snowed under with work → essere sommerso/a di lavoro
3. vinevicare

snow

(snəu) noun
frozen water vapour that falls to the ground in soft white flakes. We woke up to find snow on the ground; We were caught in a heavy snow-shower; About 15 centimetres of snow had fallen overnight.
verb
to shower down in, or like, flakes of snow. It's snowing heavily.
ˈsnowy adjective
1. full of, or producing a lot of, snow. The weather has been very snowy recently.
2. white like snow. the old man's snowy (white) hair.
ˈsnowball noun
a ball of snow pressed hard together, especially made by children for throwing, as a game.
ˈsnowboard noun
a board on which a person can stand and glide over snow for sport.
ˈsnow-capped adjective
(of mountains etc) having tops which are covered with snow. snow-capped peaks.
ˈsnowdrift noun
a bank of snow blown together by the wind. There were deep snowdrifts at the side of the road.
ˈsnowfall noun
1. a fall or shower of snow that settles on the ground. There was a heavy snowfall last night.
2. the amount of snow that falls in a certain place. The snowfall last year was much higher than average.
ˈsnowflake noun
one of the soft, light flakes composed of groups of crystals, in which snow falls. A few large snowflakes began to fall from the sky.
ˈsnowstorm noun
a heavy fall of snow especially accompanied by a strong wind.
ˌsnow-ˈwhite adjective
white like snow.
snowed under
overwhelmed eg with a great deal of work. Last week I was absolutely snowed under with work.

snow

ثَلْج, يَسقُطُ الْثَلْجُ snežit, sníh sne Schnee, schneien χιόνι, χιονίζω nevar, nieve lumi, sataa lunta neige, neiger snijeg, sniježiti neve, nevicare, 雪が降る, 눈이 내리다 sneeuw, sneeuwen snø śnieg, śnieżyć nevar, neve идет снег, снег snö, snöa หิมะ, หิมะตก kar, kar yağmak tuyết, tuyết rơi 下雪,

snow

n. nieve;
v. nevar;
___ blindnessceguera por resplandor de ___.
References in classic literature ?
As young readers like to know `how people look', we will take this moment to give them a little sketch of the four sisters, who sat knitting away in the twilight, while the December snow fell quietly without, and the fire crackled cheerfully within.
One night in January when it was bitter cold and snow lay deep on the streets of Winesburg Curtis Hartman paid his last visit to the room in the bell tower of the church.
We were talking about what it is like to spend one's childhood in little towns like these, buried in wheat and corn, under stimulating extremes of climate: burning summers when the world lies green and billowy beneath a brilliant sky, when one is fairly stifled in vegetation, in the color and smell of strong weeds and heavy harvests; blustery winters with little snow, when the whole country is stripped bare and gray as sheet-iron.
It falls by no rule at all; sometimes it leaps, sometimes it tumbles; there it skips; here it shoots; in one place 'tis white as snow, and in another 'tis green as grass; hereabouts, it pitches into deep hollows, that rumble and crush the 'arth; and thereaways, it ripples and sings like a brook, fashioning whirlpools and gullies in the old stone, as if 'twas no harder than trodden clay.
In this magical light that beauty seemed to be sustained and carried along by the river winding at its base, lifted again to the broad shoulder of the mountain, and lost only in the distant vista of death-like, overcrowning snow.
To go of errands with his slow and shuffling gait, which made you doubt how he ever was to arrive anywhere; to saw a small household's foot or two of firewood, or knock to pieces an old barrel, or split up a pine board for kindling-stuff; in summer, to dig the few yards of garden ground appertaining to a low-rented tenement, and share the produce of his labor at the halves; in winter, to shovel away the snow from the sidewalk, or open paths to the woodshed, or along the clothes-line; such were some of the essential offices which Uncle Venner performed among at least a score of families.
How often was he appalled by some shrub covered with snow, which, like a sheeted spectre, beset his very path
By reason of these things, then, the whaling voyage was welcome; the great flood-gates of the wonder-world swung open, and in the wild conceits that swayed me to my purpose, two and two there floated into my inmost soul, endless processions of the whale, and, mid most of them all, one grand hooded phantom, like a snow hill in the air.
Yet while all its giant neighbors have the look of being built of solid snow, from their waists up, the Matterhorn stands black and naked and forbidding, the year round, or merely powdered or streaked with white in places, for its sides are so steep that the snow cannot stay there.
John Knightley now came into the room from examining the weather, and opened on them all with the information of the ground being covered with snow, and of its still snowing fast, with a strong drifting wind; concluding with these words to Mr.
She had set out at an early hour, but had lingered on the road, inclined by her indolence to believe that if she waited under a warm shed the snow would cease to fall.
Now if I were not in Natal, I should say that there was a heavy fall of snow coming," said the White Man to himself.