snowdrift


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snow·drift

 (snō′drĭft′)
n.
A mass or bank of snow piled up by the wind.

snowdrift

(ˈsnəʊˌdrɪft)
n
(Physical Geography) a bank of deep snow driven together by the wind

snow•drift

(ˈsnoʊˌdrɪft)

n.
1. a mound or bank of snow driven together by the wind.
2. snow driven before the wind.
[1250–1300]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.snowdrift - a mass of snow heaped up by the windsnowdrift - a mass of snow heaped up by the wind
drift - a large mass of material that is heaped up by the wind or by water currents
Translations
رُكام ثَلْجي
závěj
snedrive
hótorlasz
skafl
kar yığıntısı

snowdrift

[ˈsnəʊdrɪft] Nventisca f, ventisquero m

snowdrift

[ˈsnəʊˌdrɪft] ncumulo di neve (ammucchiato dal vento)

snow

(snəu) noun
frozen water vapour that falls to the ground in soft white flakes. We woke up to find snow on the ground; We were caught in a heavy snow-shower; About 15 centimetres of snow had fallen overnight.
verb
to shower down in, or like, flakes of snow. It's snowing heavily.
ˈsnowy adjective
1. full of, or producing a lot of, snow. The weather has been very snowy recently.
2. white like snow. the old man's snowy (white) hair.
ˈsnowball noun
a ball of snow pressed hard together, especially made by children for throwing, as a game.
ˈsnowboard noun
a board on which a person can stand and glide over snow for sport.
ˈsnow-capped adjective
(of mountains etc) having tops which are covered with snow. snow-capped peaks.
ˈsnowdrift noun
a bank of snow blown together by the wind. There were deep snowdrifts at the side of the road.
ˈsnowfall noun
1. a fall or shower of snow that settles on the ground. There was a heavy snowfall last night.
2. the amount of snow that falls in a certain place. The snowfall last year was much higher than average.
ˈsnowflake noun
one of the soft, light flakes composed of groups of crystals, in which snow falls. A few large snowflakes began to fall from the sky.
ˈsnowstorm noun
a heavy fall of snow especially accompanied by a strong wind.
ˌsnow-ˈwhite adjective
white like snow.
snowed under
overwhelmed eg with a great deal of work. Last week I was absolutely snowed under with work.
References in classic literature ?
Though he still felt some warmth from the tea he had drunk and from his energetic struggle when clambering about in the snowdrift, he knew that this warmth would not last long and that he had no strength left to warm himself again by moving about, for he felt as tired as a horse when it stops and refuses to go further in spite of the whip, and its master sees that it must be fed before it can work again.
Walking across the yard, passing a snowdrift by the lilac tree, he went into the cowhouse.
The frozen particles of ice, brushed from the blades of grass by the wind, and borne across my face; the hard clatter of the horse's hoofs, beating a tune upon the ground; the stiff-tilled soil; the snowdrift, lightly eddying in the chalk-pit as the breeze ruffled it; the smoking team with the waggon of old hay, stopping to breathe on the hill-top, and shaking their bells musically; the whitened slopes and sweeps of Down-land lying against the dark sky, as if they were drawn on a huge slate!
When they came to the bridge, however, she halted, leaned on the parapet, and stared for a moment at the clear, brown pool, and swift, transient snowdrift of the rapids.
No, no, mother,' replied Wardle; 'he says there's a snowdrift, and a wind that's piercing cold.
I rose with some difficulty from under the superincumbent snowdrift, and alighted from the carriage, expecting that a kind and hospitable reception would indemnify me for the toils and hardships of the day.
Tulliver showed, at least to the eyes of the medical man, stronger and stronger symptoms of a gradual return to his normal condition; the paralytic obstruction was, little by little, losing its tenacity, and the mind was rising from under it with fitful struggles, like a living creature making its way from under a great snowdrift, that slides and slides again, and shuts up the newly made opening.
You can clamber on the snowdrift, Peony, and reach them easily.
After going heedlessly for some fifty yards along the street he walked into a snowdrift and was up to his knees before he stopped.
When they stopped howling the silence fell down again as solid and heavy as a snowdrift against a door, and men could hear the beating of their blood in the thin passages of the ear, and the thumping of their own hearts, that sounded as loud as the noise of sorcerers' drums beaten across the snow.
Sometimes the thermometer would fall to ten or twenty degrees below zero at night, and in the morning the streets would be piled with snowdrifts up to the first-floor windows.
John's whole heart was set on becoming a country doctor, with Rebecca to keep house for him, and the vision seemed now so true, so near, that he could almost imagine his horse ploughing through snowdrifts on errands of mercy, or, less dramatic but none the less attractive, could see a physician's neat turncut trundling along the shady country roads, a medicine case between his, Dr.