soapberry

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soap·ber·ry

 (sōp′bĕr′ē)
n.
1.
a. Any of various chiefly tropical trees of the genus Sapindus, having pulpy saponin-containing fruit that lathers like soap.
b. The fruit of any of these trees.
2. A buffaloberry.

soapberry

(ˈsəʊpˌbɛrɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Plants) any of various chiefly tropical American sapindaceous trees of the genus Sapindus, esp S. saponaria (or S. marginatus), having pulpy fruit containing saponin
2. (Plants) a related plant, S. drummondii, of the southwestern US
3. (Cookery) the fruit of any of these trees
Also called: chinaberry

soap•ber•ry

(ˈsoʊpˌbɛr i, -bə ri)

n., pl. -ries.
1. the fruit of any tropical or subtropical tree of the genus Sapindus, esp. S. saponaria: used as a substitute for soap.
2. the tree itself.
[1685–95]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.soapberry - a tree of the genus Sapindus whose fruit is rich in saponinsoapberry - a tree of the genus Sapindus whose fruit is rich in saponin
genus Sapindus, Sapindus - type genus of the Sapindaceae
Sapindus drumondii, Sapindus marginatus, wild China tree - deciduous tree of southwestern United States having pulpy fruit containing saponin
China tree, chinaberry, false dogwood, jaboncillo, Sapindus saponaria - evergreen of tropical America having pulpy fruit containing saponin which was used as soap by Native Americans
tree - a tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Soap nuts are known worldwide by many names such as soapberries, washing nuts, wash shells, and many more.
Growing Naturals, LLC is the maker of organic plant-based protein powders, milk-substitute powders and sports nutrition, and Simply SoapBerrye a line of laundry soap derived from organic soapberries harvested in the Himalayan Mountains.
Patronized by well-heeled business executives and the Indian community alike," a local newspaper described the Muckamuck as a restaurant where "about 20 Indians prepare and serve such traditional Northwest Coast delicacies as seaweed, herring roe and soapberries as well as full-course seafood meals eaten from carved Haida feast bowls.