soapberry


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Related to soapberry: soapberry family, soapberry tree

soap·ber·ry

 (sōp′bĕr′ē)
n.
1.
a. Any of various chiefly tropical trees of the genus Sapindus, having pulpy saponin-containing fruit that lathers like soap.
b. The fruit of any of these trees.
2. A buffaloberry.

soapberry

(ˈsəʊpˌbɛrɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Plants) any of various chiefly tropical American sapindaceous trees of the genus Sapindus, esp S. saponaria (or S. marginatus), having pulpy fruit containing saponin
2. (Plants) a related plant, S. drummondii, of the southwestern US
3. (Cookery) the fruit of any of these trees
Also called: chinaberry

soap•ber•ry

(ˈsoʊpˌbɛr i, -bə ri)

n., pl. -ries.
1. the fruit of any tropical or subtropical tree of the genus Sapindus, esp. S. saponaria: used as a substitute for soap.
2. the tree itself.
[1685–95]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.soapberry - a tree of the genus Sapindus whose fruit is rich in saponinsoapberry - a tree of the genus Sapindus whose fruit is rich in saponin
genus Sapindus, Sapindus - type genus of the Sapindaceae
Sapindus drumondii, Sapindus marginatus, wild China tree - deciduous tree of southwestern United States having pulpy fruit containing saponin
China tree, chinaberry, false dogwood, jaboncillo, Sapindus saponaria - evergreen of tropical America having pulpy fruit containing saponin which was used as soap by Native Americans
tree - a tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
shinnery oak (Quercus havardii), soapberry trees (Sapindus sp.
The contemporary yet authentic interpretations of traditional recipes are a feast for all senses, but some of the most sought-after, unusual produce, such as the tiny eulachon fish and foamy soapberry ice cream, are kept off the menu.
On the other hand, the number of fungal zoospores was decreased by soapberry fruit-MP pellet supplementation in dairy heifers (Poungchompu et al.
It is also known with various names such as soapnut, soapberry, washnut, reetha, aritha, dodan and doadni in different parts of the world [13].
Heavy ingestion of the immature aril (fruit) of ackee (Blighia sapida) or other members of the soapberry family (Sapindaceae), including lychee (Litchi sinensis), rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum), and longan (Dimocarpus longan), by an undernourished child with low glycogen/glucose stores probably has the potential to result in toxic hypoglycemic syndrome.
Simply SoapBerry has been named a 2014 National Parenting Publications Awards (NAPPA) Gold winner.
Very simply, soap nuts are the dried shells (or husks) from the soapberry (or soap berry nut).
Events include dance performances, a juried art show, Native artist market, seaweed contest, soapberry contest, and the Toddler Regalia Review, along with workshops, lectures, and a parade.
Supplementation of pellets containing condensed tannins and saponins (mangosteen peel powder and soapberry fruit) influenced rumen ecology by reducing methanogen population and consequent methane emission (Poungchompu et al.
The plants at Independence City, Bridgeport, Hamilton Gardens, Portmore Villas, and Caymanas Gardens, which receive a combined flow of just over 18,200 cubic metres per day, will be converted into transfer pumping stations for the delivery of effluent to the Soapberry Wastewater Treatment Plant in St Catherine, which has the capacity to treat some 75,000 cubic metres of sewage per day.
When the SoapBerry was found, he knew it was the perfect fit.
However, a branch species, Sapindus saponaria, sometimes known as Hawaiian or Florida soapberry, is grown in the United States, and there is evidence that the fruit was used by indigenous people as soap.