society


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so·ci·e·ty

 (sə-sī′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. so·ci·e·ties
1.
a. The totality of people regarded as forming a community of interdependent individuals: working for the benefit of society.
b. A group of people broadly distinguished from other groups by mutual interests, participation in characteristic relationships, shared institutions, and a common culture: rural society; literary society.
2. An organization or association of persons engaged in a common profession, activity, or interest: a folklore society; a society of bird watchers.
3. The wealthy, socially dominant members of a community. Also called high society.
4. Companionship; company: enjoys the society of friends and family members.
5. Biology A colony or community of organisms, usually of the same species: an insect society.

[French société, from Old French, from Latin societās, fellowship, from socius, companion; see sekw- in Indo-European roots.]

society

(səˈsaɪətɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. (Sociology) the totality of social relationships among organized groups of human beings or animals
2. (Sociology) a system of human organizations generating distinctive cultural patterns and institutions and usually providing protection, security, continuity, and a national identity for its members
3. (Sociology) such a system with reference to its mode of social and economic organization or its dominant class: middle-class society.
4. (Sociology) those with whom one has companionship
5. an organized group of people associated for some specific purpose or on account of some common interest: a learned society.
6.
a. the privileged class of people in a community, esp as considered superior or fashionable
b. (as modifier): a society woman.
7. the social life and intercourse of such people: to enter society as a debutante.
8. companionship; the fact or state of being together with someone else: I enjoy her society.
9. (Botany) ecology a small community of plants within a larger association
[C16: via Old French societé from Latin societās, from socius a comrade]

so•ci•e•ty

(səˈsaɪ ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties,
adj. n.
1. an organized group of persons associated together for religious, benevolent, cultural, scientific, political, patriotic, or other purposes.
2. a body of individuals living as members of a community; community.
3. human beings collectively, viewed as members of a community: the evolution of society.
4. a highly structured system of human organization for large-scale community living that normally furnishes protection, continuity, security, and a national identity for its members: American society.
5. such a system characterized by its dominant economic class or form: middle-class society; an industrial society.
6. those with whom one has companionship.
7. companionship; company.
8. the social life of wealthy, prominent, or fashionable persons.
9. the social class that comprises such persons.
10. the condition of those living in companionship with others, or in a community, rather than in isolation.
11. Biol. a closely integrated group of social organisms of the same species exhibiting division of labor.
adj.
12. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of elegant society: a society photographer.
[1525–35; < Middle French societe < Latin societās <soci(us) partner, comrade]
sociable, social, society - Sociable, social, society, etc. originate in Latin socius, "companion, fellow," or "colleague."
See also related terms for social.

Society


the attitude of taking an active part in events, especially in a social context. — activist, n.
an abnormal fear of people, especially in groups.
1. government by the best people.
2. an upper class based on quality, nobility, etc.
a dedication to aristocratie behavior.
the attitudes and actions of aristocrats.
a society or nation ruled by a person with absolute authority. — autocrat, n. — autocratie, adj.
In England. the aristocracy that gained its wealth and social posi-tion from the ownership of breweries.
a Utopian society in which all foods and other material needs will be prepared by chemical processes. — chemocrat, n.
an upper class based on wealth. Also chrysoaristocracy.
the area of political science concerned with citizenship.
a brotherhood, especially a group of men bound by a common goal or interest.
that portion of the upper class whose wealth comes from the cotton trade. — cottonocrat, n.
a doctrine of or belief in social equality or the right of all people to participate equally in politics.
attitudes or actions of well-intentioned but sometimes ineffectual people, especially in the area of social reform.
the branch of sociology that studies the environmental spacing and interdependence of people and their institutions. — ecologist, oecologist, n.ecologie, oecologic, ecological, oecological, adj.
the process by which a person adapts to and assimilates the culture in which he lives.
the doctrine or practice of excluding certain groups or individuals from enjoyment of certain rights or privileges. — exclusionist, n.
theories and beliefs of J. G. Fichte (1762-1814), German philosopher and social thinker, a precursor of socialism. — Fichtean, n., adj.
government or domination of society by fools.
the state of being nonhomogeneous or inharmonious. — fractionalization, n.
a fellowship or association of men, as for a benevolent or charitable purpose or at a college.
a state in which the worst possible conditions exist in government, society, law. etc. See also utopia.
a ruling class that owes its power to its possession of land. — landocrat, n.
1. the system of manorial social and political organization, as in the Middle Ages.
2. its principles and practices.
3. Sometimes Pejorative. any small, strong unit of local political and social organization.
1. a matriarchal form of government.
2. a family, tribe, or other social group ruled by a matriarch or matriarchs. — matriarchic, adj.
government or dominance of society by the médiocre.
a powerful class composed of people who have achieved position on the basis of their merit rather than by birth or privilege. — meritocrat, n.
government or domination of society by the rich.
Facetious. a wealthy and dominant force in society whose wealth and power is based on control of oil.
the sociological theory that all cultures or societies follow the same fixed course of determinate evolution. See also evolution. — orthogenetic, adj.
the condition of being outcast from society. — pariahdom, n.
the domination of a social group, especially a small rural com-munity, by the parson.
1. behavior or attitudes typical of one who has recently acquired wealth or social position.
2. the state or quality of being a parvenu or upstart. — parvenu, n., adj.
1. a subdivision of an ancient Greek tribe or phyle.
2. a clan or other unit of a primitive tribe.
the state of living apart from society, like a hermit. — recluse, n. — reclusive, adj.
the rank, position or jurisdiction of a steward of a medieval prince or nobleman.
Facetious. snobs as a class in society.
the process of adapting to a social group; social intercourse or activity.
collective government or government by society as a whole.
a theory asserted sociologistically. — sociologistic, adj.
1. the science or study of the origin, development, organization, and functioning of human society.
2. the science of the fundamental laws of social relations, institutions, etc. — sociologist, n. — sociologie, sociological, adj.
the measurement of social attitudes within a group by sampling expressions of social acceptance or rejection. — sociometrist, n. — sociometrie, adj.
Rare. the study of the laws that govern the development of society.
a fellowship, brotherhood, or other association of a benevolent nature, especially in the Roman Catholic Church. — sodalist, n., adj.
Sociology. a theory that the possibility of founding a social organization upon a solidarity of interests is to be found in the natural interde-pendence of members of a society. — solidarist, n. — solidaristic, adj.
the feeling or expression of union in a group formed by a common interest.
a fellowship or association of women, as for a benevolent or charitable purpose or at a college.
a woman’s club or society, named after a club of that name, founded in 1869.
In Britain. the squires or landed gentry as a class.
the practice or custom, as among the ancient Spartans and Cretans, of eating the main meal of the day together in public to strengthen social and political bonds.
the harnessing of natural and social forces for a beneficial goal.
1. the practice of having a natural object or animate being, as a bird or animal, as the emblem of a family, clan, or group.
2. the practice of regarding such a totem as mystically related to the family, clan, or group and therefore not to be hunted.
3. a system of tribal organization according to totems. — totemic, adj.
the beliefs and policies associated with the welfare system.

Society

 the people in the fashionable world, 1813; certain communities of animals or insects.
Examples: society of beavers, 1794; of wasps, 1826.

Society

 
  1. Civilization, like beauty, is in the eyes of the beholder —Anon
  2. A good civilization spreads over us freely like a tree, varying and yielding because it is alive. A bad civilization stands up and sticks out above us like an umbrella —G. K. Chesterton
  3. A community is like a ship; every one ought to be prepared to take the helm —Henrik Ibsen
  4. Modern society is like a Calder mobile: disturb it here and it jiggles over there, too —George F. Will
  5. Social life is a form of do-it-yourself theater —Muriel Oxenberg Murphy, New York Times interview
  6. Societies, like individuals, have their moral crises and their spiritual revolutions —Richard H. Tawney
  7. Society is a kind of parent to its members. If it, and they, are to thrive, its values must be clear, coherent and generally acceptable —Milton R. Sapirstein
  8. Society is a masked ball, where everyone hides his real character, and reveals it in hiding —Ralph Waldo Emerson
  9. Society is like air; very high up, it is sublimated, too low down, a perfect choke-damp —Anon
  10. Society is like a lawn, where every roughness is smoothed, every bramble eradicated, and where the eye is delighted by the smiling verdure of a velvet surface —Washington Irving
  11. Society is like a wave. The wave moves onward, but the water of which it is composed does not —Ralph Waldo Emerson
  12. Society is like the air, necessary to breathe, but insufficient to live on —George Santayana

society

1. used as an uncountable noun

Society refers to people in general, considered as a large organized group.

Women must have equal status in society.
The whole structure of society is changing.

When society has this meaning, don't use 'a' or 'the' in front of it.

2. used as a countable noun

A society refers to the people of a particular country, considered as an organized group.

We live in a multi-cultural society.
Industrial societies became increasingly complex.

A society is also an organization for people who share an interest or aim.

The gardens are owned by the Royal Horticultural Society.
He was a member of the National Society of Film Critics.

society

A group of people who form a system of relationships and have their own culture.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.society - an extended social group having a distinctive cultural and economic organizationsociety - an extended social group having a distinctive cultural and economic organization
social group - people sharing some social relation
sector - a social group that forms part of the society or the economy; "the public sector"
social class, socio-economic class, stratum, class - people having the same social, economic, or educational status; "the working class"; "an emerging professional class"
civilization, civilisation - a society in an advanced state of social development (e.g., with complex legal and political and religious organizations); "the people slowly progressed from barbarism to civilization"
culture, civilisation, civilization - a particular society at a particular time and place; "early Mayan civilization"
open society - a society that allows its members considerable freedom (as in a democracy); "America's open society has made it an easy target for terrorists"
tribal society - a society with the social organization of a tribe
social organisation, social organization, social structure, social system, structure - the people in a society considered as a system organized by a characteristic pattern of relationships; "the social organization of England and America is very different"; "sociologists have studied the changing structure of the family"
2.society - a formal association of people with similar interestssociety - a formal association of people with similar interests; "he joined a golf club"; "they formed a small lunch society"; "men from the fraternal order will staff the soup kitchen today"
association - a formal organization of people or groups of people; "he joined the Modern Language Association"
athenaeum, atheneum - a literary or scientific association for the promotion of learning
bookclub - a club that people join in order to buy selected books at reduced prices
chapter - a local branch of some fraternity or association; "he joined the Atlanta chapter"
chess club - a club of people to play chess
country club - a suburban club for recreation and socializing
frat, fraternity - a social club for male undergraduates
glee club - a club organized to sing together
golf club - a club of people to play golf
hunt club, hunt - an association of huntsmen who hunt for sport
investors club - a club of small investors who buy and sell securities jointly
jockey club - a club to promote and regulate horse racing
racket club - club for players of racket sports
rowing club - a club for rowers
slate club - a group of people who save money in a common fund for a specific purpose (usually distributed at Christmas)
sorority - a social club for female undergraduates
turnverein - a club of tumblers or gymnasts
boat club, yacht club - club that promotes and supports yachting and boating
service club - a club of professional or business people organized for their coordination and active in public services
club member - someone who is a member of a club
3.society - the state of being with someonesociety - the state of being with someone; "he missed their company"; "he enjoyed the society of his friends"
freemasonry - a natural or instinctive fellowship between people of similar interests; "he enjoyed the freemasonry of the Press"
friendly relationship, friendship - the state of being friends (or friendly)
4.society - the fashionable elitesociety - the fashionable elite    
Four Hundred - the exclusive social set of a city
elite, elite group - a group or class of persons enjoying superior intellectual or social or economic status

society

noun
1. the community, social order, people, the public, the population, humanity, civilization, mankind, the general public, the world at large This reflects attitudes and values prevailing in society.
2. community, culture, population those responsible for destroying our African heritage and the fabric of our society
3. organization, group, club, union, league, association, institute, circle, corporation, guild, fellowship, fraternity, brotherhood or sisterhood the historical society
4. upper classes, gentry, upper crust (informal), elite, the swells (informal), high society, the top drawer, polite society, the toffs (Brit. slang), the smart set, beau monde, the nobs (slang), the country set, haut monde (French) The couple tried to secure themselves a position in society.
5. (Old-fashioned) companionship, company, fellowship, friendship, camaraderie I largely withdrew from the society of others.
Quotations
"Human life in common is only made possible when a majority comes together which is stronger than any separate individual and which remains united against all separate individuals" [Sigmund Freud Civilization and Its Discontents]
"Man did not enter into society to become worse than he was before, nor to have fewer rights than he had before, but to have those rights better secured" [Thomas Paine The Rights of Man]
"There is no such thing as society" [Margaret Thatcher]
"He who is unable to live in society, or who has no need because he is sufficient for himself, must be either a beast or a god" [Aristotle Politics]

society

noun
1. Persons as an organized body:
2. A group of people united in a relationship and having some interest, activity, or purpose in common:
4. A pleasant association among people:
Translations
مُجْتَمَعجَماعَه، مُجْتَمَعجَمْعِيَّه، نادٍشَرِكَهطَبَقَة إجْتِماعِيَّه
společnostklublidská společnostsdružení
samfundselskabde fine kredseforeninghigh society
yhteiskuntayhteisökerhoseurayhdistys
društvozajednica
társadalomtársaság
efri stéttir òjóîfélagsins; fína fólkiîfélagfélag, samtökfélagsskapurmannlegt samfélag
社会
사회
augstākās aprindasbiedrībakompānijasabiedrībasavienība
ľudská spoločnosť
družbadruštvo
samhälleförening
สังคม
xã hội

society

[səˈsaɪətɪ]
A. N
1. (= social community) → sociedad f
he was a danger to societyera un peligro para la sociedad
a multi-cultural societyuna sociedad pluricultural
2. (= company) → compañía f
I enjoyed his societyme encantó su compañía
in the society ofen compañía de, acompañado por
in polite societyentre gente educada
3. (= high society) → alta sociedad f
to go into society [girl] → ponerse de largo
to move in societyfrecuentar la alta sociedad
4. (= club, organization) → asociación f, sociedad f
a drama societyuna asociación or sociedad de amigos del teatro
the Glasgow film societyla sociedad cinematográfica de Glasgow
learned societysociedad f científica, academia f
the Society of Friendslos cuáqueros
B. CPD society column Necos mpl de sociedad, notas fpl sociales (LAm)
society news NSINGnotas fpl de sociedad
society party Nfiesta f de sociedad
society wedding Nboda f de sociedad
society woman Nmujer f conocida en la alta sociedad

society

[səˈsaɪəti]
n
(= social community) → société f
We live in a multi-cultural society → Nous vivons dans une société multiculturelle.
(= club) → société f
a drama society → un club de théâtre
the film society → le ciné-club
I'm on the committee of the local film society
(also high society) → haute société f, société f
modif [party, wedding] → mondain(e); [girl, lady] → de la haute sociétésociety column n (in newspaper)carnet m mondainsocio-economic [ˌsəʊsiəʊiːkənɒmɪk] adjsocioéconomique

society

n
(= social community)die Gesellschaft; modern industrial societydie moderne Industriegesellschaft
(= company)Gesellschaft f; I enjoy her society (esp liter)ich bin gerne in ihrer Gesellschaft; everyone needs human societyjeder braucht die Gesellschaft anderer Menschen
(= high society)die Gesellschaft; London societydie Londoner Gesellschaft, die gesellschaftlichen Kreise Londons; to go into societyin die Gesellschaft eingeführt werden; the years she spent in societydie Jahre, die sie in gesellschaftlichen or feinen Kreisen verbracht hat
(= club, organization)Verein m; (learned, Comm) → Gesellschaft f; (debating, history, dramatic etc, Sch) → Arbeitsgemeinschaft f; (Univ) → Klub m; cooperative societyGenossenschaft f; Society of JesusGesellschaft Jesu

society

in cpdsGesellschafts-;
society column
nGesellschaftsspalte f
society gossip
nGesellschaftsklatsch m
society man
nMann mder Gesellschaft
society wedding

society

[səˈsaɪətɪ]
1. n
a. (social community) → società f inv
to live in society → vivere in società
he was a danger to society → era un pericolo pubblico
b. (club, organization) → società f inv, associazione f
film society → cineclub m inv
learned society → circolo culturale
c. (also high society) → alta società
polite society → società bene
d. (frm) (company) → compagnia
in the society of → in compagnia di
I enjoyed his society → ho gradito la sua compagnia
2. adj (party, column) → mondano/a

society

(səˈsaiəti) plural soˈcieties noun
1. mankind considered as a whole. He was a danger to society.
2. a particular group or part of mankind considered as a whole. middle-class society; modern western societies.
3. an association or club. a model railway society.
4. the class of people who are wealthy, fashionable or of high rank in any area. high society.
5. company or companionship. I enjoy the society of young people.

society

مُجْتَمَع společnost samfund Gesellschaft κοινωνία sociedad yhteiskunta société društvo società 社会 사회 maatschappij samfunn społeczeństwo sociedade общество samhälle สังคม toplum xã hội 社会

society

n. sociedad; organización social.
References in classic literature ?
It was excellent drill for their memories, a harmless amusement, and employed many hours which otherwise would have been idle, lonely, or spent in less profitable society.
The Professor stopped off there on his way from Boston, where he has been lecturing before some society.
Pontellier had the privilege of quitting their society when they ceased to be entertaining.
Then, with an elevation of breeding that many in a more cultivated state of society might profitably emulate, one of the chiefs drew the attention of the young men from the weakness they had just witnessed, by saying, in a cheerful voice, addressing himself in courtesy to Magua, as the newest comer:
Many dark and sleepless nights have I been a companion for owls, separated from the chearful society of men, scorched by the Summer's sun, and pinched by the Winter's cold, an instrument ordained to settle the wilderness.
I sometimes fancy that my condition if I had less opposition and more society and stimulus--but John says the very worst thing I can do is to think about my condition, and I confess it always makes me feel bad.
Carr was too absorbed in business to give heed to what he looked upon as a convulsion of society as natural as a geological upheaval, and too prudent to provoke the criticism of his daughters by comment in their presence.
The new heir, up to the period of his accession, was reckoned rather a dissipated youth, but had at once reformed, and made himself an exceedingly respectable member of society.
Little accustomed, in her long seclusion from society, to measure her ideas of right and wrong by any standard external to herself, Hester saw -- or seemed to see -- that there lay a responsibility upon her in reference to the clergyman, which she owned to no other, nor to the whole world besides.
As one will, with one's most serious experiences, hastening to laugh lest one should weep, as the old philosopher said, I had made some fun out of my quest, in the form of a paper for a bookish society to which I belonged, on "Woman as a Learned Pursuit.
It is curious to observe, that in every state of society, some sort of ghostly consolation is provided for the members of the community, though assembled for purposes diametrically opposite to religion.
Meanwhile, man, having fought and won his fight for this personal liberty, only to find himself a more abject slave than before, is turning with loathing from his egotist's dream of independence to the collective interests of society, with the welfare of which he now perceives his own happiness to be inextricably bound up.

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