sociohistorical

sociohistorical

(ˌsəʊsɪəʊhɪˈstɒrɪkəl)
adj
involving social and historical elements
References in periodicals archive ?
He argues that KantAEs transcendentalism, in the context of autopoietic theory, for example, amounts to what biologists call the AaAaAeA structural couplingAaAaAeA of organism and environment--molec biological as opposed to sociohistorical terms.
The wider sociohistorical context, including medical debates and evolving legal disputes, is skillfully woven into the analysis, demonstrating the author's expertise in the political nuances of the postcolonial era through the prerevolution period.
She said Maranaos have unique practices brought about by their sociohistorical background and environment, but their works should not be limited to these experiences.
Deschenes's installations sensitize the spectator to the complex and often elliptical vectors of mediation that exceed the axis of mere representation, establishing monadic resonances between inside and outside that are by turns phenomenological, architectural, sociohistorical, and institutional.
This collection certainly should be in every school and college library, and will be of interest, by virtue of its depiction of landscape, of a particular sociohistorical period and the excellence of its verse, in various areas of the curriculum.
maintains that modern literary methods are useful for studying ancient characters, assuming that interpreters are knowledgeable of the first-century world and can accordingly locate the characters in their sociohistorical context.
Despite the pain and irreversible damage to the body caused by the high-heeled shoe, its undying allure can never be overstated: It's an object of sociohistorical significance that for centuries has become an icon of glamour, wealth, and femininity.
In "An Anatomy of Suspense: The Pleasurable, Critical, Ethical, Erotic Middle of The Woman in White," Caroline Levine also furthers the book's purpose by examining a specific formal problem in the Wilkie Collins novel (suspense) through the lens of a nineteenth-century sociohistorical development (scientific epistemology).
By comparing the language Lady Katherine Paston uses in letters to her son and in those to other adults, Nevalainen is able to identify politeness phenomena, lexical features and even language change in the language of child-directed speech, a hitherto practically non-explored topic in sociohistorical linguistics.
The compactness and clarity of Drummond's language, along with his adept interweaving of the accounts of Husserl's work, his personal life, and the sociohistorical context, make for a compelling and informative read.