sock


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sock 1

 (sŏk)
n.
1. A garment that covers the foot and part of the leg usually made of cotton or wool and worn for warmth or for protection from abrasion from a shoe or boot.
2. Meteorology A windsock.
3.
a. A light shoe worn by comic actors in ancient Greek and Roman plays.
b. Comic drama; comedy: "He ... knew all niceties of the sock and buskin" (Byron).
tr.v. socked, sock·ing, socks
To provide with socks.
Phrasal Verbs:
sock away Informal
To put (money) away in a safe place for future use.
sock in
To cause to be closed to traffic, as by reducing visibility or physically impeding passage: fog that socked in the airport; ice that socked in the harbor.

[Middle English socke, from Old English socc, a kind of light shoe, from Latin soccus, possibly from Greek sunkhis, sukkhos, Phrygian shoe.]

sock 2

 (sŏk)
v. socked, sock·ing, socks
v.tr.
To hit or strike forcefully; punch.
v.intr.
To deliver a blow.
n.
A hard blow or punch.
Idiom:
sock it to (someone) Slang
To deliver a forceful comment, reprimand, or physical blow to someone else.

[Origin unknown.]

sock

(sɒk)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a cloth covering for the foot, reaching to between the ankle and knee and worn inside a shoe
2. (Clothing & Fashion) an insole put in a shoe, as to make it fit better
3. (Theatre) a light shoe worn by actors in ancient Greek and Roman comedy, sometimes taken to allude to comic drama in general (as in the phrase sock and buskin). See buskin
4. (Aeronautics) another name for windsock
5. pull one's socks up informal Brit to make a determined effort, esp in order to regain control of a situation
6. put a sock in it slang Brit be quiet!
vb
7. (tr) to provide with socks
8. (Aeronautics) socked in slang US and Canadian (of an airport) closed by adverse weather conditions
[Old English socc a light shoe, from Latin soccus, from Greek sukkhos]

sock

(sɒk)
vb
1. (usually tr) to hit with force
2. sock it to to make a forceful impression on
n
a forceful blow
[C17: of obscure origin]

sock1

(sɒk)

n., pl. socks or, for 1, sometimes sox.
1. a short stocking usu. reaching to the calf or just above the ankle.
2. a lightweight shoe worn by ancient Greek and Roman comic actors.
3. comic writing for the theater; comedy or comic drama. Compare buskin (def. 3).
v.t.
4. sock away, to put into savings or reserve.
5. sock in, to close up (an airport) or ground (an aircraft).
[before 900; Middle English socke, Old English socc « Latin soccus slipper]

sock2

(sɒk)

v.t.
1. to strike or hit hard.
n.
2. a hard blow.
adj.
3. socko.
[1690–1700; orig. uncertain]

sock


Past participle: socked
Gerund: socking

Imperative
sock
sock
Present
I sock
you sock
he/she/it socks
we sock
you sock
they sock
Preterite
I socked
you socked
he/she/it socked
we socked
you socked
they socked
Present Continuous
I am socking
you are socking
he/she/it is socking
we are socking
you are socking
they are socking
Present Perfect
I have socked
you have socked
he/she/it has socked
we have socked
you have socked
they have socked
Past Continuous
I was socking
you were socking
he/she/it was socking
we were socking
you were socking
they were socking
Past Perfect
I had socked
you had socked
he/she/it had socked
we had socked
you had socked
they had socked
Future
I will sock
you will sock
he/she/it will sock
we will sock
you will sock
they will sock
Future Perfect
I will have socked
you will have socked
he/she/it will have socked
we will have socked
you will have socked
they will have socked
Future Continuous
I will be socking
you will be socking
he/she/it will be socking
we will be socking
you will be socking
they will be socking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been socking
you have been socking
he/she/it has been socking
we have been socking
you have been socking
they have been socking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been socking
you will have been socking
he/she/it will have been socking
we will have been socking
you will have been socking
they will have been socking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been socking
you had been socking
he/she/it had been socking
we had been socking
you had been socking
they had been socking
Conditional
I would sock
you would sock
he/she/it would sock
we would sock
you would sock
they would sock
Past Conditional
I would have socked
you would have socked
he/she/it would have socked
we would have socked
you would have socked
they would have socked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sock - hosiery consisting of a cloth covering for the footsock - hosiery consisting of a cloth covering for the foot; worn inside the shoe; reaches to between the ankle and the knee
anklets, bobbysock, bobbysocks, anklet - a sock that reaches just above the ankle
argyle, argyll - a sock knitted or woven with an argyle design (usually used in the plural)
athletic sock, sweat sock, varsity sock - a sock worn for athletic events
hose, hosiery - socks and stockings and tights collectively (the British include underwear)
knee-hi, knee-high - a sock or stocking that reaches up to just below the knees
tabi, tabis - a sock with a separation for the big toe; worn with thong sandals by the Japanese
2.sock - a truncated cloth cone mounted on a mastsock - a truncated cloth cone mounted on a mast; used (e.g., at airports) to show the direction of the wind
visual signal - a signal that involves visual communication
Verb1.sock - hit hardsock - hit hard        
hit - deal a blow to, either with the hand or with an instrument; "He hit her hard in the face"

sock

Tights and socks

ankle sock or (U.S.) anklet, argyle, bed sock, bobby sock, half-hose, hose (history), knee-high sock, legwarmer, lisle stocking, maillot, nylons, pop sock, puttee or putty, tights or (esp. U.S. & Austral.)pantihose or pantyhose, sock, slouch sock, stay-up, stock (archaic), stocking

sock

verb
To deliver a powerful blow to suddenly and sharply:
Informal: biff, bop, clip, wallop.
Slang: belt, conk, paste.
Idioms: let someone have it, sock it to someone.
noun
A sudden sharp, powerful stroke:
Informal: bash, biff, bop, clip, wallop.
Slang: belt, conk, paste.
Translations
جَوْرَبٌ قَصِيرجَوْرَب قَصيرضَرْبَةٌ شَديدَهيَضْرِب بِقَبْضَتِهِ
чорап
ponožkaránauhodit
sokstrømpeslåslag
sokk
sukka
sokna
zokni
sokkur
ソックス
양말
iezveltzeķezveliens
ponožkaudrieť
nogavica
čarapaчарапа
socka
ถุงเท้า
çorapyumrukyumruk atmak
tất

sock

1 [sɒk] N
1.calcetín m, media f (LAm)
to pull one's socks uphacer esfuerzos, despabilarse
put a sock in it!¡a callar!, ¡cállate!
this will knock your socks offesto es para quitarse el sombrero
2. (= windsock) → manga f (de viento)

sock

2 [sɒk]
A. N (= blow) → puñetazo m
to give sb a sock on the jawpegar a algn en la cara
B. VTpegar
sock him one!¡pégale!

sock

[ˈsɒk]
nchaussette f
a pair of socks → une paire de chaussettes
to pull one's socks up (lit)remonter ses chaussettes (British) (fig) (= try harder) → se secouer
vt (= hit) → flanquer un coup à
sock it to 'em! (= show them) → montre-leur!

sock

1
nSocke f, → Socken m (inf); (knee-length) → Kniestrumpf m; (= wind sock)Wind- or Luftsack m; to pull one’s socks up (Brit inf) → sich am Riemen reißen (inf); put a sock in it! (Brit inf) → hör auf damit!; to work ones socks off (inf)bis zum Umkippen arbeiten (inf); this will knock or blow your socks off (inf)das wird dich umhauen; this film knocks the socks off most other science fiction films (inf)dieser Film stellt die meisten anderen Sciencefictionfilme in den Schatten

sock

2
n (inf)Schlag m(mit der Faust); to give somebody a sock on the jaw/in the eyejdm eine aufs Kinn/aufs Auge verpassen (inf); that’s a sock in the eye for her! (fig inf)das hat es ihr ordentlich gegeben!
vt (inf: = hit) → hauen (inf); sock him one!knall ihm eine! (inf), → hau ihm eine rein! (inf); he socked her right in the eyeer verpasste ihr eine aufs Auge (inf)

sock

1 [sɒk] n (short) → calzino; (long) → calzettone m; (of horse) → balzana
to pull one's socks up (fig) → darsi una regolata
put a sock in it! (Brit) (fam) → chiudi il becco!

sock

2 [sɒk] (fam)
1. n (blow) → colpo, pugno
to give sb a sock on the jaw → dare un pugno sul muso a qn
2. vtcolpire, picchiare
come on, sock him one! → dai, suonagliele!

sock1

(sok) noun
a (usually wool, cotton or nylon) covering for the foot and ankle, sometimes reaching to the knee, worn inside a shoe, boot etc. I need a new pair of socks.

sock2

(sok) verb
(slang) to strike someone hard with the fist. He socked the burglar (on the jaw).
noun
(slang) a strong blow with the fist. He gave me a sock on the jaw.

sock

جَوْرَبٌ قَصِير ponožka sok Socke κάλτσα calcetín sukka chaussette sokna calzino ソックス 양말 sok sokk skarpeta meia носок socka ถุงเท้า çorap tất 袜子

sock

n. media, calcetín.

sock

n calcetín m
References in classic literature ?
And Jo shook the blue army sock till the needles rattled like castanets, and her ball bounded across the room.
Grandmother chuckled and drove her bright needle across a hole in Otto's sock.
So I rose softly, and gradually got on everything--down to one sock.
Mother of all the saints in bliss and all the devils in cinders, where's my fine new sock widout the heel?
My trouser had slipped up, exposing a few inches of my skin above my sock.
Unable to answer this question, she put down his sock, which she was trying to mend, and gazed out through the window.
But he ran on into the middle of the street, with a slipper on one foot and a sock on the other; he still had on his apron, and still held the gold chain and the pincers in his hands, and so he stood gazing up at the bird, while the sun came shining brightly down on the street.
Jackson looked down his leg to the unwrinkled sock that joined it to a glossy pump.
Many of the elder people had their feet covered with small figures, so placed as to resemble a sock.
with one red sock on and one wanting), in the bar; where the cheese was cast aground upon a shelf, in company with a mouldy tablecloth and a green-handled knife, in a sort of cast-iron canoe; where the pale-faced bread shed tears of crumb over its shipwreck in another canoe; where the family linen, half washed and half dried, led a public life of lying about; where everything to drink was drunk out of mugs, and everything else was suggestive of a rhyme to mugs; The Tilted Wagon, all these things considered, hardly kept its painted promise of providing good entertainment for Man and Beast.
Hanging over the top of the gate like a wet sock, Lord Dawlish watched her go.
At that instant the sunlight fell on his left boot; on the sock which poked out from the boot, he fancied there were traces