soft line

soft line

n.
A moderate or flexible policy or position, as on a political issue.


soft′-line′ adj.
soft′-lin′er n.

soft line

n
a moderate flexible attitude or policy
ˌsoft-ˈliner n

soft′ line′


n.
a position or policy, as in politics, that is moderate and flexible.
[1965–70]
soft′-line′, adj.
soft′-lin′er, n.
References in classic literature ?
She turned pale; the soft lines of pleasure in her face hardened, little by little; she regarded me with the saddest look of confusion and distress.
So Arthur took her hand and knelt beside her, and she looked her best, with all the soft lines matching the angelic beauty of her eyes.
Pullquote use soft line breaks ADJUST Go Run for fun is circle, a foundation which aims to get more youngsters into the sport.
And if regulators take a soft line on any concessions required to allow the deal to proceed, this could spur more mergers in the industry.
The mouthpiece appears to take a soft line on Rajiv Gandhi, but says there was a "cover-up plan" to protect Italian businessman Ottavio Quattrocchi.
He said if the rulers took a soft line this time again and NATO supplies were restored unconditionally, the worst could be expected in future.
Australian Vote Leads The Way [WP] Gillard Accused of Soft Line on Tel Aviv [The Age] Tony Abbott Calls For Restraint on Israel [The Australian] Related: Murder in Dubai [Tablet Magazine]
IN THE end the European Council adopted the soft line advocated by France, Germany and Italy towards Russia over the Georgia conflict.
PONTYPRIDD MP Kim Howells has angrily denied taking a soft line towards human rights abuses in his position as Foreign Office Minister.
He said: "Taking a soft line, I'd say I find Findlay's comments foolish in the extreme.
He also slammed Britain's soft line on cannabis by downgrading it to a Class C drug.
In addition, Mundial will launch a Quilter's Duo scissor set in its Cushion Soft line this winter, and is considering other items whose sale would benefit the NBCF.