soft money


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soft money

n.
Money donated to political parties to support general political activities rather than a particular candidate, and thus not subject to regulations or limits that govern campaign contributions.

soft money

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) politics (in the US) money that can be spent by a political party on grass-roots organization, recruitment, advertising, etc; it must be deposited in a party's non-federal (state-level) bank accounts, and must not be used in connection with presidential or congressional elections. Compare hard money

soft′ mon′ey


n.
money contributed to a political candidate or party that is not subject to federal regulations.

soft money

Funds provided by a government or institution for a one-off project. Soft money is available only once and cannot be relied on as a source of future income.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.soft money - political contributions made in such a way as to avoid the United States regulations for federal election campaigns (as by contributions to a political action committee)
political contribution, political donation - a contribution made to a politician or a political campaign or a political party
References in periodicals archive ?
McConnell understood at the time that many GOP senators feared the end of soft money but were afraid of the negative publicity that opposing McCain's crusade would bring.
The dollars at stake aren't earth-shaking; in the 2004 election cycle, companies contributed about $75 million in soft money at the federal level.
If a Fortune 100 company's profits are roughly $5 billion a year, and the company makes $500,000 in political contributions in a two-year election cycle (an amount few donors ever reach), and if the firm further receives a 100 percent return on those soft money contributions, the profit would amount to about 0.
The parties raised more than $1 billion, 12 percent more than before the McCain-Feingold legislation put an end to soft money.
The biggest soft money loophole has proven to involve tax-exempt, nonprofit organizations (known as 527s by their IRS Code number) that, under the bill, are allowed to do partisan education and issue advocacy work as long as they are "independent" from political parties and campaigns.
From the beginning, opponents of increased campaign finance regulation knew that legislation purporting to reform the system by banning soft money would fail miserably.
Republicans, like those at a Senate hearing on the topic scheduled for March 10, are suddenly aghast that there's soft money being used to finance campaign activities.
As the Court noted in McConnell, the use of soft money has increased enormously in recent years, from $21.
The ban on soft money will have an anticompetitive impact on future electoral outcomes.
In 1998, he barely won reelection after he refused to accept soft money.
The Bill would allow state and local parties to raise soft money, but only in amounts of pounds 6,250 or less.
The proposed Shays-Meehan bill would ban soft money or unlimited contributions to the national parties' coffers that are often used for voter mobilization and advertising.