soft-liner

soft line

n.
A moderate or flexible policy or position, as on a political issue.


soft′-line′ adj.
soft′-lin′er n.
Translations

soft-liner

[ˌsɒftˈlaɪnəʳ] Nblando/a m/f
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Kelty Cache Box provides a protective padded soft-liner, adjustable dividers for custom organization and plenty of storage space.
o The former top national security aide is no soft-liner and thinks it would be a disaster to withdraw from Afghanistan or set deadlines for getting out.
10) What is paradoxical in this context is that Houari Boumediene appeared like a soft-liner because the so-called "liberals" in the ruling bloc, despite their opposition to the Charter, resisted any weakening of the bloc.
The first was becoming known as the Hard-Liners on Berlin and while the other had been disparagingly labeled by the hawks in the room as the SLOBs, or the Soft-Liners on Berlin.
Diplomatic experts say North Korean leader Kim Jong-il, too, has walked a tight rope between military hard-liners and civilian soft-liners.
Nelson Rockefeller signed into law what he called "the toughest antidrug program in the nation" and then congratulated himself and the legislators who stood fast "against this strange alliance of vested establishment interests, political opportunists and misguided soft-liners who joined forces and tried unsuccessfully to stop this program.
Pacts were constructed between soft-liners in the ancien regime and moderates in civil society.
When the balance of power became clear, in large measure through elections in the spring of 1990, these societal actors then imposed their will on the weaker elites from the ancien regime, be they soft-liners or hard-liners.
One top official in a neighboring Arab nation described a debate that had been going on in Saudi Arabia between the hard-liners, who wanted to crack down on Al Qaeda, and the soft-liners, who wanted to deal with the fundamentalists by embracing them.