soil


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Related to soil: soil profile, soil erosion, Soil formation

soil 1

 (soil)
n.
1. The top layer of the earth's surface in which plants can grow, consisting of rock and mineral particles mixed with decayed organic matter and having the capability of retaining water.
2. A particular kind of earth or ground: sandy soil.
3. Country; land: native soil.
4. The agricultural life: a man of the soil.
5. A place or condition favorable to growth; a breeding ground.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman, a piece of ground (influenced in meaning by Latin solum, soil), from Latin solium, seat; see sed- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

soil 2

 (soil)
v. soiled, soil·ing, soils
v.tr.
1. To make dirty, particularly on the surface.
2. To disgrace; tarnish: a reputation soiled by scandal.
3. To corrupt; defile.
4. To dirty with excrement.
v.intr.
To become dirty, stained, or tarnished.
n.
1.
a. The state of being soiled.
b. A stain.
2. Filth, sewage, or refuse.
3. Manure, especially human excrement, used as fertilizer.

[Middle English soilen, from Old French souiller, from Vulgar Latin *suculāre (from Late Latin suculus, diminutive of Latin sūs, pig; see sū- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots) or from souil, wallow of a wild boar (from Latin solium, seat, bathtub; see soil1).]

soil 3

 (soil)
tr.v. soiled, soil·ing, soils
To feed (livestock) with soilage.

[Origin unknown.]

soil

(sɔɪl)
n
1. (Physical Geography) the top layer of the land surface of the earth that is composed of disintegrated rock particles, humus, water, and air. See zonal soil, azonal soil, intrazonal soil, horizon4, horizon5
2. (Physical Geography) a type of this material having specific characteristics: loamy soil.
3. land, country, or region: one's native soil.
4. (Agriculture) the soil life and work on a farm; land: he belonged to the soil, as his forefathers had.
5. any place or thing encouraging growth or development
[C14: from Anglo-Norman, from Latin solium a seat, but confused with Latin solum the ground]

soil

(sɔɪl)
vb
1. to make or become dirty or stained
2. (tr) to pollute with sin or disgrace; sully; defile: he soiled the family honour by his cowardice.
n
3. the state or result of soiling
4. (Biology) refuse, manure, or excrement
[C13: from Old French soillier to defile, from soil pigsty, probably from Latin sūs a swine]

soil

(sɔɪl)
vb
(Agriculture) (tr) to feed (livestock) freshly cut green fodder either to fatten or purge them
[C17: perhaps from obsolete vb (C16) soil to manure, from soil2 (n)]

soil1

(sɔɪl)

n.
1. the portion of the earth's surface consisting of disintegrated rock and humus.
2. the ground or earth: tilling the soil.
3. a particular kind of earth: sandy soil.
4. a country, land, or region.
5. any environment nurturing growth or development.
[1300–50; Middle English soile < Anglo-French soyl < Latin solium seat, confused with solum ground]

soil2

(sɔɪl)

v.t.
1. to make dirty or filthy.
2. to smudge or stain.
3. to sully or tarnish, as with disgrace.
v.i.
4. to become soiled.
n.
5. the act or fact of soiling.
6. the state of being soiled.
7. a spot or stain.
8. foul matter; filth; sewage.
9. ordure; manure.
[1175–1225; Middle English soilen (v.) < Old French souiller, soillier to dirty, (of a pig) to wallow, appar. derivative of souil pigsty, abysm, of uncertain orig.]

soil3

(sɔɪl)

v.t.
to feed (confined cattle, horses, etc.) freshly cut green fodder for roughage.
[1595–1605; orig. uncertain]

soil

(soil)
The loose top layer of the Earth's surface, consisting of rock and mineral particles mixed with decayed organic matter (known as humus). Soil provides the support and nutrients that many plants need to grow.

Soil


the branch of geology concerned with the adaptability of land to agriculture, soil quality, etc.
the branch of soil science dealing especially with crop production. — agrologist, n. — agrological, adj.
pedology.
the science of cultivation; agriculture. — geoponist, n. — geoponic, geoponical, adj.
the process by which loose mineral fragments or particles of sand are solidified into stone.
the branch of pedology that studies the soil conditions of past geologic ages. — paleopedologist, palaeopedologist, n. — paleopedologic, palaeopedologic, paleopedological, palaeopedological, adj.
the branch of agriculture that studies soils; soil science. — pedologist, n. — pedologic, pedological, adj.
the state or quality of being rich or fertile. — pinguid, adj.

soil


Past participle: soiled
Gerund: soiling

Imperative
soil
soil
Present
I soil
you soil
he/she/it soils
we soil
you soil
they soil
Preterite
I soiled
you soiled
he/she/it soiled
we soiled
you soiled
they soiled
Present Continuous
I am soiling
you are soiling
he/she/it is soiling
we are soiling
you are soiling
they are soiling
Present Perfect
I have soiled
you have soiled
he/she/it has soiled
we have soiled
you have soiled
they have soiled
Past Continuous
I was soiling
you were soiling
he/she/it was soiling
we were soiling
you were soiling
they were soiling
Past Perfect
I had soiled
you had soiled
he/she/it had soiled
we had soiled
you had soiled
they had soiled
Future
I will soil
you will soil
he/she/it will soil
we will soil
you will soil
they will soil
Future Perfect
I will have soiled
you will have soiled
he/she/it will have soiled
we will have soiled
you will have soiled
they will have soiled
Future Continuous
I will be soiling
you will be soiling
he/she/it will be soiling
we will be soiling
you will be soiling
they will be soiling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been soiling
you have been soiling
he/she/it has been soiling
we have been soiling
you have been soiling
they have been soiling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been soiling
you will have been soiling
he/she/it will have been soiling
we will have been soiling
you will have been soiling
they will have been soiling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been soiling
you had been soiling
he/she/it had been soiling
we had been soiling
you had been soiling
they had been soiling
Conditional
I would soil
you would soil
he/she/it would soil
we would soil
you would soil
they would soil
Past Conditional
I would have soiled
you would have soiled
he/she/it would have soiled
we would have soiled
you would have soiled
they would have soiled

soil

Broken rock fragments, often mixed with decayed organic matter.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.soil - the state of being covered with unclean thingssoil - the state of being covered with unclean things
dirtiness, uncleanness - the state of being unsanitary
2.soil - the part of the earth's surface consisting of humus and disintegrated rocksoil - the part of the earth's surface consisting of humus and disintegrated rock
marl - a loose and crumbling earthy deposit consisting mainly of calcite or dolomite; used as a fertilizer for soils deficient in lime
regosol - a type of soil consisting of unconsolidated material from freshly deposited alluvium or sand
residual clay, residual soil - the soil that is remaining after the soluble elements have been dissolved
surface soil, topsoil - the layer of soil on the surface
subsoil, undersoil - the layer of soil between the topsoil and bedrock
alluvial soil - a fine-grained fertile soil deposited by water flowing over flood plains or in river beds
bog soil - poorly drained soils on top of peat and under marsh or swamp vegetation
clay - a very fine-grained soil that is plastic when moist but hard when fired
clunch - hardened clay
desert soil, desertic soil - a type of soil that develops in arid climates
earth, ground - the loose soft material that makes up a large part of the land surface; "they dug into the earth outside the church"
caliche, hardpan - crust or layer of hard subsoil encrusted with calcium-carbonate occurring in arid or semiarid regions
fuller's earth - an absorbent soil resembling clay; used in fulling (shrinking and thickening) woolen cloth and as an adsorbent
gilgai soil - soil in the melon holes of Australia
gumbo, gumbo soil - any of various fine-grained silty soils that become waxy and very sticky mud when saturated with water
humus - partially decomposed organic matter; the organic component of soil
indurated clay - hardened clay
Indian red - a red soil containing ferric oxide; often used as a pigment
laterite - a red soil produced by rock decay; contains insoluble deposits of ferric and aluminum oxides
loam - a rich soil consisting of a mixture of sand and clay and decaying organic materials
loess - a fine-grained unstratified accumulation of clay and silt deposited by the wind
mould, mold - loose soil rich in organic matter
mud, clay - water soaked soil; soft wet earth
bole - a soft oily clay used as a pigment (especially a reddish brown pigment)
podsol, podsol soil, podsolic soil, podzol, podzol soil - a soil that develops in temperate to cold moist climates under coniferous or heath vegetation; an organic mat over a grey leached layer
prairie soil - a type of soil occurring under grasses in temperate climates
sand - a loose material consisting of grains of rock or coral
sedimentary clay - clay soil formed by sedimentary deposits
silt - mud or clay or small rocks deposited by a river or lake
boulder clay, till - unstratified soil deposited by a glacier; consists of sand and clay and gravel and boulders mixed together
tundra soil - a black mucky soil with a frozen subsoil that is characteristic of Arctic and subarctic regions
wiesenboden - a dark meadow soil rich in organic material; developed through poor drainage in humid grassy or sedge regions
3.soil - material in the top layer of the surface of the earth in which plants can grow (especially with reference to its quality or use); "the land had never been plowed"; "good agricultural soil"
object, physical object - a tangible and visible entity; an entity that can cast a shadow; "it was full of rackets, balls and other objects"
badlands - deeply eroded barren land
bottomland, bottom - low-lying alluvial land near a river
coastland - land in a coastal area
ploughland, plowland, tillage, tilled land, cultivated land, farmland, tilth - arable land that is worked by plowing and sowing and raising crops
overburden - the surface soil that must be moved away to get at coal seams and mineral deposits
permafrost - ground that is permanently frozen
polder - low-lying land that has been reclaimed and is protected by dikes (especially in the Netherlands)
rangeland - land suitable for grazing livestock
scablands - (geology) flat elevated land with poor soil and little vegetation that is scarred by dry channels of glacial origin (especially in eastern Washington)
greensward, sod, sward, turf - surface layer of ground containing a mat of grass and grass roots
wetland - a low area where the land is saturated with water
4.soil - the geographical area under the jurisdiction of a sovereign state; "American troops were stationed on Japanese soil"
Verb1.soil - make soiled, filthy, or dirtysoil - make soiled, filthy, or dirty; "don't soil your clothes when you play outside!"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
foul - make unclean; "foul the water"
contaminate, pollute, foul - make impure; "The industrial wastes polluted the lake"
smear - stain by smearing or daubing with a dirty substance
slime - cover or stain with slime; "The snake slimed his victim"
muddy, muddy up - dirty with mud
splash - soil or stain with a splashed liquid
mud, muck up, muck, mire - soil with mud, muck, or mire; "The child mucked up his shirt while playing ball in the garden"
crock - soil with or as with crock
blemish, spot - mar or impair with a flaw; "her face was blemished"

soil

1
noun
1. earth, ground, clay, dust, dirt, loam regions with sandy soils
2. territory, country, land, region, turf (U.S. slang), terrain The issue of foreign troops on Turkish soil is a sensitive one.
Related words
adjective telluric

soil

2
verb dirty, foul, stain, smear, muddy, pollute, tarnish, spatter, sully, defile, besmirch, smirch, maculate (literary), bedraggle, befoul, begrime Young people don't want to do things that soil their hands.
dirty clean, wash, bath, sweep, dust, wipe, cleanse, vacuum, scrub, sponge, rinse, mop, launder, scour, purify, swab, disinfect, lave, sanitize

soil

verb
2. To contaminate the reputation of:
Idioms: give a black eye to, sling mud on.
3. To make morally impure:
Translations
تُرْبَةٌتُرْبَهيُوَسِّخ، يُلَطِّخ
sòl
půdašpinitzemě
jordgrund
maaperämultasontaliatalika
zemlja
földtalajtáptalaj
tanah
jarîveguróhreinka
augsnenotraipītzeme
špiniť
zemlja
jordmark
ดิน
đất

soil

1 [sɔɪl] N (= earth) → tierra f
his native soilsu tierra natal, su patria
on British soilen suelo británico
the soil (= farmland) → la tierra

soil

2 [sɔɪl]
A. VT
1. (= dirty) → ensuciar; (= stain) → manchar
to soil o.sensuciarse
2. (fig) [+ reputation, honour etc] → manchar
I would not soil myself by contact withno me rebajaría a tener contacto con ...
B. VIensuciarse

soil

[ˈsɔɪl]
n
(= earth) → sol m
The soil here is very fertile → Le sol est très fertile ici.
(= territory) → sol m
on British soil → sur le sol britannique
modif [erosion] → des sols; [conditions, sample, type] → de sol; [science] → du sol
soil scientist → pédologue mf
vt
(= dirty) → souiller
(fig)souiller

soil

1
n (= earth, ground)Erde f, → Erdreich nt, → Boden m; cover it with soilbedecken Sie es mit Erde; native/foreign/British soilheimatlicher/fremder/britischer Boden, heimatliche/fremde/britische Erde; the soil (fig: = farmland) → die Scholle; a son of the soilein mit der Scholle verwachsener Mensch

soil

2
vt (lit)beschmutzen, schmutzig machen; (fig) reputationbeschmutzen, beflecken; honourbeflecken; oneselfbesudeln; the baby has soiled its nappydas Baby hat eine schmutzige Windel or hat in die Windel gemacht; to soil one’s hands (lit, fig)sich (dat)die Hände schmutzig or dreckig (inf)machen

soil

[sɔɪl]
1. n (earth) → terreno, terra, suolo
chalky/poor soil → terreno calcareo/povero
cover it with soil → coprilo di terra
on British soil → sul suolo britannico
the soil (fig) (farmland) → la terra
2. vt (dirty) → sporcare (fig) (reputation, honour) → infangare, macchiare

soil1

(soil) noun
the upper layer of the earth, in which plants grow. to plant seeds in the soil; a handful of soil.

soil2

(soil) verb
to dirty or stain. Don't soil your dress with these dusty books!

soil

تُرْبَةٌ půda jord Erde χώμα tierra maaperä terre zemlja suolo grond jord gleba solo почва jord ดิน toprak đất 土壤

soil

n. tierra, terreno; [dirt] suciedad.

soil

vt ensuciar; to — oneself ensuciarse
References in classic literature ?
It was easy for them to determine that Tom and his friends had gone in, since the marks of their boots were plainly in evidence in the soft soil.
The family were now fairly equipped to begin their struggle with the soil.
The roof of bark had long since fallen, and mingled with the soil, but the huge logs of pine, which had been hastily thrown together, still preserved their relative positions, though one angle of the work had given way under the pressure, and threatened a speedy downfall to the remainder of the rustic edifice.
The innocent husbandman was shot down, while busy cultivating the soil for his family's supply.
It seemed as if the gold they had taken out was by some ironical compensation gradually making its way back to the soil again through ditch and flume and reservoir.
What greatly strengthens such a suspicion is the fact that this controversy between two ill-matched antagonists --at a period, moreover, laud it as we may, when personal influence had far more weight than now--remained for years undecided, and came to a close only with the death of the party occupying the disputed soil.
The sentiment is probably assignable to the deep and aged roots which my family has stuck into the soil.
It resembled that perpendicular seam sometimes made in the straight, lofty trunk of a great tree, when the upper lightning tearingly darts down it, and without wrenching a single twig, peels and grooves out the bark from top to bottom, ere running off into the soil, leaving the tree still greenly alive, but branded.
First they took out the soil to make bricks, and then they filled it up again with garbage, which seemed to Jurgis and Ona a felicitous arrangement, characteristic of an enterprising country like America.
if it comes to that, I can earn myself at least six feet of free soil,--the first and last I shall ever own in Kentucky
When he has exhausted the rich soil of Europe, and reinvigorated himself, "then recommences his adventurous career westward as in the earliest ages.
It was one which I had heard attributed to every humorous person who had ever stood on American soil, from Columbus down to Artemus Ward.