sol-fa


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sol-fa

 (sōl-fä′) Music
n.
1. The set of syllables do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, and ti, used to represent the tones of the scale.
2. Use of these syllables.
intr. & tr.v. sol-faed, sol-fa·ing, sol-fas
To use the sol-fa syllables or sing using these syllables.

[Italian solfa, from Medieval Latin : sol, note of the scale; see gamut + fa, note of the scale; see gamut.]

sol-fa

(ˈsɒlˈfɑː)
n
(Music, other) short for tonic sol-fa
vb, -fas, -faing or -faed
(Music, other) US to use tonic sol-fa syllables in singing (a tune)
[C16: see gamut]

sol-fa

(ˌsoʊlˈfɑ, ˈsoʊlˌfɑ)

n., v. -faed, -fa•ing. n.
1. the musical syllables do,re,me,fa,sol,la, and ti, sung to the ascending tones of a diatonic scale.
v.i.
3. to use sol-fa syllables in singing.
[1560–70]
sol`-fa′ist, n.

sol-fa

- The sol-fa syllables are doh, ray, mi, fah, sol, lah, te—for the notes of the major musical scale.
See also related terms for ray.

sol-fa


Past participle: sol-faed
Gerund: sol-faing

Imperative
sol-fa
sol-fa
Present
I sol-fa
you sol-fa
he/she/it sol-fas
we sol-fa
you sol-fa
they sol-fa
Preterite
I sol-faed
you sol-faed
he/she/it sol-faed
we sol-faed
you sol-faed
they sol-faed
Present Continuous
I am sol-faing
you are sol-faing
he/she/it is sol-faing
we are sol-faing
you are sol-faing
they are sol-faing
Present Perfect
I have sol-faed
you have sol-faed
he/she/it has sol-faed
we have sol-faed
you have sol-faed
they have sol-faed
Past Continuous
I was sol-faing
you were sol-faing
he/she/it was sol-faing
we were sol-faing
you were sol-faing
they were sol-faing
Past Perfect
I had sol-faed
you had sol-faed
he/she/it had sol-faed
we had sol-faed
you had sol-faed
they had sol-faed
Future
I will sol-fa
you will sol-fa
he/she/it will sol-fa
we will sol-fa
you will sol-fa
they will sol-fa
Future Perfect
I will have sol-faed
you will have sol-faed
he/she/it will have sol-faed
we will have sol-faed
you will have sol-faed
they will have sol-faed
Future Continuous
I will be sol-faing
you will be sol-faing
he/she/it will be sol-faing
we will be sol-faing
you will be sol-faing
they will be sol-faing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been sol-faing
you have been sol-faing
he/she/it has been sol-faing
we have been sol-faing
you have been sol-faing
they have been sol-faing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been sol-faing
you will have been sol-faing
he/she/it will have been sol-faing
we will have been sol-faing
you will have been sol-faing
they will have been sol-faing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been sol-faing
you had been sol-faing
he/she/it had been sol-faing
we had been sol-faing
you had been sol-faing
they had been sol-faing
Conditional
I would sol-fa
you would sol-fa
he/she/it would sol-fa
we would sol-fa
you would sol-fa
they would sol-fa
Past Conditional
I would have sol-faed
you would have sol-faed
he/she/it would have sol-faed
we would have sol-faed
you would have sol-faed
they would have sol-faed
Translations

sol-fa

[ˈsɒlˈfɑː] N (Mus) → solfeo m

sol-fa

nSolmisation f

sol-fa

[ˈsɒlˈfɑː] n (Mus) → solfeggio
References in periodicals archive ?
I have to practise sol-fa at home, for Dat, who sings for the village Male Voice, communicates in sol-fa with the confident air of a man conversing in his mother tongue, and insists that I read the tenor line to harmonise with his bass.
What word can mean a beam of light, a fish, and part of the sol-fa scale?
Teaching methods include Sol-fa, Orff, Suzuki, Dalcroze, etc.
employed: Tonic sol-fa (England), Curwen/ Glover hand signs (England),
Bm yn llwyddiannus, gyda nifer eraill, ym mhob un nes cyrraedd yr Intermediate - dyna'r olaf cyn y llythrennau ATSC mi gredaf (Associate of the Tonic Sol-fa College) Bu dyfalbarhad Mrs Hughes, a hynny'n gwbl wirfoddol ar adeg digon anodd mae'n siwr, yn gaffaeliad mawr inni i gyd.
I am teaching the Sol-Fa method of singing using traditional hand symbols and rhymes.
Music and Victorian Philanthropy: the Tonic Sol-fa Movement.
Her husband claimed he could write any tune in tonic sol-fa, but one song he refused even to attempt, saying that 'She changes the doh in every verse' and that the air was full of quarter tones and glissandi.
The ability of a choir to promote a political aim is exemplified in an essay by Charles Maguire about John Curwen and his Tonic Sol-fa Method used to teach singing and help advance the Temperance Movement in England during the second half of the nineteenth century.
The reason we all should be interested in the English Congregational minister is that he was the one who codified the tonic sol-fa method of teaching vocal music.
One of the best chapters in the book considers the background of the nineteenth-century British oratorio and touches on such diverse topics as the Tonic Sol-Fa method, the rise of the music festival, and the role of middle-and working-class notions of "self-improvement" in the success of the genre as a whole.
A later, important example is the Tonic Sol-fa method of John Curwen, based on just intonation, that was a great popular and musical success in training choral singers throughout the British Empire in the latter half of the nineteenth century.