soldiering


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sol·dier

 (sōl′jər)
n.
1. One who serves in an army.
2. An enlisted person or a noncommissioned officer.
3. An active, loyal, or militant follower of an organization.
4.
a. A nonreproductive ant or termite that has a large head and powerful jaws.
b. One of a group of honeybees that swarm in defense of a hive.
intr.v. sol·diered, sol·dier·ing, sol·diers
1. To be or serve as a soldier.
2. To make a show of working in order to escape punishment.
Phrasal Verb:
soldier on
To continue to do something, especially when it is difficult or tedious; persevere: "As Russia decayed, these Siberians soldiered on, finding ways to live and enjoy life" (Jeffrey Tayler).

[Middle English soudier, mercenary, from Anglo-Norman soudeour, soldeier and Old French soudoior, soudier, both from Old French sol, soud, sou, from Late Latin solidum, soldum, pay, from solidus, solidus; see solidus.]

sol′dier·ship′ n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.soldiering - skills that are required for the life of soldier
acquirement, skill, accomplishment, attainment, acquisition - an ability that has been acquired by training
2.soldiering - the evasion of work or dutysoldiering - the evasion of work or duty    
dodging, escape, evasion - nonperformance of something distasteful (as by deceit or trickery) that you are supposed to do; "his evasion of his clear duty was reprehensible"; "that escape from the consequences is possible but unattractive"
References in classic literature ?
Look at her; she loves dolls, and girl-plays, and everything a girl loves, and she's gentle and sweet, and ain't cruel to dumb brutes - now that's the girl-twin, but she loves boy-plays, and drums and fifes and soldiering, and rough-riding, and ain't afraid of anybody or anything - and that's the boy-twin; 'deed you needn't tell ME she's only ONE child; no, sir, she's twins, and one of them got shet up out of sight.
He has proved himself so different from me and has done so much to raise himself while I've been soldiering that I haven't brass enough in my composition to see him in this place and under this charge.
Hesho seems excellently disposed towards us, and, after all, I should have thought his word would have had more weight in Tokio than the word of a young man who is new to diplomacy, and whose claims to distinction seem to rest rather upon his soldiering and the fact that he is a cousin of the Emperor.