soldiership


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sol·dier

 (sōl′jər)
n.
1. One who serves in an army.
2. An enlisted person or a noncommissioned officer.
3. An active, loyal, or militant follower of an organization.
4.
a. A nonreproductive ant or termite that has a large head and powerful jaws.
b. One of a group of honeybees that swarm in defense of a hive.
intr.v. sol·diered, sol·dier·ing, sol·diers
1. To be or serve as a soldier.
2. To make a show of working in order to escape punishment.
Phrasal Verb:
soldier on
To continue to do something, especially when it is difficult or tedious; persevere: "As Russia decayed, these Siberians soldiered on, finding ways to live and enjoy life" (Jeffrey Tayler).

[Middle English soudier, mercenary, from Anglo-Norman soudeour, soldeier and Old French soudoior, soudier, both from Old French sol, soud, sou, from Late Latin solidum, soldum, pay, from solidus, solidus; see solidus.]

sol′dier·ship′ n.

soldiership

(ˈsəʊldʒəʃɪp)
n
(Military) the state of being a soldier
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.soldiership - skills that are required for the life of soldier
acquirement, skill, accomplishment, attainment, acquisition - an ability that has been acquired by training
References in classic literature ?
But there was a spirit in their bosoms which is more essential to soldiership than to wear red coats and march in stately ranks to the sound of regular music.
Some of them, indeed, by their services in the Low Countries and on other fields of European warfare, had fairly won their title to assume the name and pomp of soldiership.
Oh, a LOT of people WE never heard of before - the shoemaker and horse-doctor and knife-grinder kind, you know - clodhoppers from goodness knows where that never handled a sword or fired a shot in their lives - but the soldiership was in them, though they never had a chance to show it.
Drawing inspiration from Sahlins' discussions of Hawaiian and Fijian elites as active social agents in their encounters with foreigners, I am now able to formulate the main argument underlying this essay: I reason that during the 1961 British military recruitment campaign, my Fiji Islander interlocutors have shaped the 'structure of the conjuncture' particular to this critical juncture by appropriating cultural categories and discourses of Fijian soldiership and militarism in their encounters with the British recruiters (and colonialism more generally) to pursue their individual ambitions.
Pakistan is lucky in this regard; Armed Forces of Pakistan comprise the best of soldiership, and a growing defence industry which is booming with each passing year.
63) His poor soldiership is exposed when, after claiming that he 'commandeth ingress and egress with his weapon' (580-1), he is easily disarmed by Sacrapant.