soldiery


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sol·dier·y

 (sōl′jə-rē)
n.
1. Soldiers considered as a group.
2. The profession of soldiering.

soldiery

(ˈsəʊldʒərɪ)
n, pl -dieries
1. (Military) soldiers collectively
2. (Military) a group of soldiers
3. (Military) the profession of being a soldier

sol•dier•y

(ˈsoʊl dʒə ri)

n., pl. -dier•ies.
1. soldiers collectively.
2. a body of soldiers.
3. military training or skill.
[1560–70]

soldiery

soldiership or military science or craft.
See also: War

Soldiery

 soldiers collectively, 1570.
Examples: the soldiery . . . all flocked unto him, 1635; full of soldiery, 1580.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.soldiery - soldiers collectivelysoldiery - soldiers collectively    
army unit - a military unit that is part of an army
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
personnel, force - group of people willing to obey orders; "a public force is necessary to give security to the rights of citizens"
friendly - troops belonging to or allied with your own military forces; "friendlies came to their rescue"
hostile - troops belonging to the enemy's military forces; "the platoon ran into a pack of hostiles"
cavalry, horse cavalry, horse - troops trained to fight on horseback; "500 horse led the attack"
garrison - the troops who maintain and guard a fortified place
Translations

soldiery

[ˈsəʊldʒərɪ] Nsoldadesca f
a brutal and licentious soldieryla soldadesca indisciplinada

soldiery

nSoldaten pl, → Soldateska f (pej geh)
References in classic literature ?
But it is necessary that the soldiery should be superior to the other two parts, and this superiority will not be easily gained without they are very numerous; and if they are so, why should the community consist of any other members?
The inhabitants of territories, often the theatre of war, are unavoidably subjected to frequent infringements on their rights, which serve to weaken their sense of those rights; and by degrees the people are brought to consider the soldiery not only as their protectors, but as their superiors.
David of Doncaster threw a third soldier into the moat; and out through the gate went the foresters in good order, keeping a respectful distance between themselves and the advancing soldiery, by means of their well-directed shafts.
As the pirates swooped closer toward the ground, thern soldiery poured from the temples into the gardens and courts.
When you plunder a countryside, let the spoil be divided amongst your men; when you capture new territory, cut it up into allotments for the benefit of the soldiery.
Some few miles farther on he overtook a party of deserting royalist soldiery, and from them he easily, by dint of threats, elicited the information he desired: the direction taken by the refugees from the deserted castle, their number, and as close a description of the party as the soldiers could give.
At the same time several others of them walked around in front of me, and, to my astonishment, I found myself looking upon uniformed soldiery, armed with rifles, revolvers, and sabers, but with faces as black as coal.
Toward this Metak led the girl, and then, as though filled with a sudden suspicion, his eyes narrowed cunningly and turning toward the soldiery he issued an order which resulted in their all preceding him through the small doorway and up a flight of stairs a short distance beyond.
Within a hundred miles, and in the light of other fires, there were other functionaries less fortunate, that night and other nights, whom the rising sun found hanging across once-peaceful streets, where they had been born and bred; also, there were other villagers and townspeople less fortunate than the mender of roads and his fellows, upon whom the functionaries and soldiery turned with success, and whom they strung up in their turn.
The building itself showed in the distance a blaze of glorious light, and on the instant I determined to lead a detachment of warriors directly within the palace itself, while the balance of the great horde was attacking the barracks of the soldiery.
This follows also on another natural and common necessity, which always causes a new prince to burden those who have submitted to him with his soldiery and with infinite other hardships which he must put upon his new acquisition.
In despair, he turned and fled from the oncoming soldiery.