soldiery


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sol·dier·y

 (sōl′jə-rē)
n.
1. Soldiers considered as a group.
2. The profession of soldiering.

soldiery

(ˈsəʊldʒərɪ)
n, pl -dieries
1. (Military) soldiers collectively
2. (Military) a group of soldiers
3. (Military) the profession of being a soldier

sol•dier•y

(ˈsoʊl dʒə ri)

n., pl. -dier•ies.
1. soldiers collectively.
2. a body of soldiers.
3. military training or skill.
[1560–70]

soldiery

soldiership or military science or craft.
See also: War

Soldiery

 soldiers collectively, 1570.
Examples: the soldiery . . . all flocked unto him, 1635; full of soldiery, 1580.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.soldiery - soldiers collectivelysoldiery - soldiers collectively    
army unit - a military unit that is part of an army
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
personnel, force - group of people willing to obey orders; "a public force is necessary to give security to the rights of citizens"
friendly - troops belonging to or allied with your own military forces; "friendlies came to their rescue"
hostile - troops belonging to the enemy's military forces; "the platoon ran into a pack of hostiles"
cavalry, horse cavalry, horse - troops trained to fight on horseback; "500 horse led the attack"
garrison - the troops who maintain and guard a fortified place
Translations

soldiery

[ˈsəʊldʒərɪ] Nsoldadesca f
a brutal and licentious soldieryla soldadesca indisciplinada

soldiery

nSoldaten pl, → Soldateska f (pej geh)
References in classic literature ?
The other, who appeared to share equally in the attention of the young officer, concealed her charms from the gaze of the soldiery with a care that seemed better fitted to the experience of four or five additional years.
This body of soldiery -- which still sustains a corporate existence, and marches down from past ages with an ancient and honourable fame -- was composed of no mercenary materials.
Monsieur Defarge alighted; knowing one or two of the soldiery there, and one of the police.
Hundreds of broad-headed, short-stemmed, wide-branched oaks, which had witnessed perhaps the stately march of the Roman soldiery, flung their gnarled arms over a thick carpet of the most delicious green sward; in some places they were intermingled with beeches, hollies, and copsewood of various descriptions, so closely as totally to intercept the level beams of the sinking sun; in others they receded from each other, forming those long sweeping vistas, in the intricacy of which the eye delights to lose itself, while imagination considers them as the paths to yet wilder scenes of silvan solitude.
David of Doncaster threw a third soldier into the moat; and out through the gate went the foresters in good order, keeping a respectful distance between themselves and the advancing soldiery, by means of their well-directed shafts.
The inhabitants of territories, often the theatre of war, are unavoidably subjected to frequent infringements on their rights, which serve to weaken their sense of those rights; and by degrees the people are brought to consider the soldiery not only as their protectors, but as their superiors.
The building itself showed in the distance a blaze of glorious light, and on the instant I determined to lead a detachment of warriors directly within the palace itself, while the balance of the great horde was attacking the barracks of the soldiery.
No further stirs the sullen soldiery, Naught but the last dread office can avail, Till she of the dark moth-eyebrows, lily pale, Shines through tall avenues of spears to die.
At the same instant his ear caught a sort of indistinct sound on the stairs, followed by the measured tread of soldiery, with the clanking of swords and military accoutrements; then came a hum and buzz as of many voices, so as to deaden even the noisy mirth of the bridal party, among whom a vague feeling of curiosity and apprehension quelled every disposition to talk, and almost instantaneously the most deathlike stillness prevailed.
This follows also on another natural and common necessity, which always causes a new prince to burden those who have submitted to him with his soldiery and with infinite other hardships which he must put upon his new acquisition.
When you plunder a countryside, let the spoil be divided amongst your men; when you capture new territory, cut it up into allotments for the benefit of the soldiery.
Some talked of gray, bewhiskered hordes who were advancing with relentless curses and chewing tobacco with unspeakable valor; tremendous bodies of fierce soldiery who were sweeping along like the Huns.