solecism


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sol·e·cism

 (sŏl′ĭ-sĭz′əm, sō′lĭ-)
n.
1. A nonstandard usage or grammatical construction.
2. A violation of etiquette.
3. An impropriety, mistake, or incongruity.

[Latin soloecismus, from Greek soloikismos, from soloikizein, to speak incorrectly, from soloikos, speaking incorrectly, after Soloi (Soli), an Athenian colony in Cilicia where a dialect regarded as substandard was spoken.]

sol′e·cist n.
sol′e·cis′tic adj.

solecism

(ˈsɒlɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. (Grammar) the nonstandard use of a grammatical construction
2. any mistake, incongruity, or absurdity
3. a violation of good manners
[C16: from Latin soloecismus, from Greek soloikismos, from soloikos speaking incorrectly, from Soloi an Athenian colony of Cilicia where the inhabitants spoke a corrupt form of Greek]
ˈsolecist n
ˌsoleˈcistic, ˌsoleˈcistical adj
ˌsoleˈcistically adv

sol•e•cism

(ˈsɒl əˌsɪz əm, ˈsoʊ lə-)

n.
1. a nonstandard or ungrammatical usage, as unflammable or they was.
2. a breach of good manners or etiquette.
3. any error, impropriety, or inconsistency.
[1570–80; < Latin soloecismus < Greek soloikismós=sóloik(os) (Sólo(i) a city in Cilicia where a corrupt form of Attic Greek was spoken + -ikos -ic) + -ismos -ism]
sol′e•cist, n.
sol`e•cis′tic, adj.

solecism

a violation of conventional usage and grammar, as “I are sixty year old.” — solecist, n.solecistic, solecistical, adj.
See also: Grammar

solecism

A usage that constitutes a breach of the standard rules of grammar or syntax.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.solecism - a socially awkward or tactless actsolecism - a socially awkward or tactless act  
blooper, blunder, boner, boo-boo, botch, bungle, flub, foul-up, fuckup, pratfall, bloomer - an embarrassing mistake

solecism

noun
A term that offends against established usage standards:
Translations

solecism

[ˈsɒləsɪzəm] Nsolecismo m

solecism

n (linguistic) → Solözismus m (geh), → Fehler m; (in behaviour etc) → Fauxpas m

solecism

[ˈsɒləˌsɪzm] n (frm) (in grammar) → solecismo; (in behaviour) → scorrettezza
References in classic literature ?
I assert, then, that in the wondrous bodily whiteness of the bird chiefly lurks the secret of the spell; a truth the more evinced in this, that by a solecism of terms there are birds called grey albatrosses; and these I have frequently seen, but never with such emotions as when I beheld the Antarctic fowl.
Your garb and manner were restricted by rule; your air was often diffident, and altogether that of one refined by nature, but absolutely unused to society, and a good deal afraid of making herself disadvantageously conspicuous by some solecism or blunder; yet when addressed, you lifted a keen, a daring, and a glowing eye to your interlocutor's face: there was penetration and power in each glance you gave; when plied by close questions, you found ready and round answers.
But with reverence to these grave authorities, it seems unlikely that the assembled princes of Europe should have adjudged to Godfrey a coat armorial so much contrary to the general rule, if such rule had then existed; at any rate, it proves that metal upon metal, now accounted a solecism in heraldry, was admitted in other cases similar to that in the text.
The important truth, which it unequivocally pronounces in the present case, is that a sovereignty over sovereigns, a government over governments, a legislation for communities, as contradistinguished from individuals, as it is a solecism in theory, so in practice it is subversive of the order and ends of civil polity, by substituting VIOLENCE in place of LAW, or the destructive COERCION of the SWORD in place of the mild and salutary COERCION of the MAGISTRACY.
For it is the solecism of power, to think to command the end, and yet not to endure the mean.
She smiled again, turned, and walked away, leaving George to reckon up all the social solecisms he had contrived to commit in the space of a single moment.
He even took private instruction in English, and succeeded in eliminating his worst faults, though in moments of excitement he was prone to lapse into "you-all," "knowed," "sure," and similar solecisms.
Special Envoy for Sudan and South Sudan, Lucy Tamlyn, yielded only an ambiguous grammatical solecism in response: "The U.
Guccione's effort to class up sci-fi art was like trying to break-dance in a Vegas tuxedo, but he never saw the solecism there.
19) Critics continue to address these qualities of his poetry, variously referring to its "complexity," "indeterminacy," or "Keatsian solecism.
S]he had to improvise daily to maintain Simone and Charles occupied" is not English, "she could no longer bare the thought" is a solecism, and there are eccentricities of capitalization and punctuation throughout.
The question of whether this may be a youthful solecism is valid.