solemn


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Related to solemn: solemn promise

sol·emn

 (sŏl′əm)
adj.
1.
a. Serious and dignified: a solemn occasion. See Synonyms at serious.
b. Showing or behaving with dignified restraint or earnestness: "Spade's face was solemn except for wrinkles at the corners of his eyes" (Dashiell Hammett).
2. Performed with full ceremony: a solemn High Mass.
3. Made with deep sincerity or invoking the force of religion: a solemn vow.
4. Dark or undecorated: a solemn forest; a solemn hall.

[Middle English solemne, from Old French, from Latin sollemnis, established, customary; see sol- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

sol′emn·ly adv.
sol′emn·ness n.

solemn

(ˈsɒləm)
adj
1. characterized or marked by seriousness or sincerity: a solemn vow.
2. characterized by pomp, ceremony, or formality
3. serious, glum, or pompous
4. inspiring awe: a solemn occasion.
5. (Ecclesiastical Terms) performed with religious ceremony
6. gloomy or sombre: solemn colours.
[C14: from Old French solempne, from Latin sōllemnis appointed, perhaps from sollus whole]
ˈsolemnly adv
ˈsolemnness, ˈsolemness n

sol•emn

(ˈsɒl əm)

adj.
1. grave; mirthless: solemn remarks.
2. somberly sedate or profound: solemn music.
3. serious; earnest: solemn assurances.
4. of a formal or ceremonious character: a solemn occasion.
5. made in due legal or other express form: a solemn oath.
6. marked or observed with religious rites: a solemn holy day.
[1275–1325; Middle English solem(p)ne (< Old French) < Late Latin sōlennis, sōlempnis, Latin sōlemnis, variant of sollemnis consecrated, holy, derivative of sollus whole]
sol′emn•ly, adv.
sol′emn•ness, n.
syn: See grave2.

Solemn

 of parsons—Lipton, 1970.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.solemn - dignified and somber in manner or character and committed to keeping promises; "a grave God-fearing man"; "a quiet sedate nature"; "as sober as a judge"; "a solemn promise"; "the judge was solemn as he pronounced sentence"
serious - concerned with work or important matters rather than play or trivialities; "a serious student of history"; "a serious attempt to learn to ski"; "gave me a serious look"; "a serious young man"; "are you serious or joking?"; "Don't be so serious!"
2.solemn - characterized by a firm and humorless belief in the validity of your opinions; "both sides were deeply in earnest, even passionate"; "an entirely sincere and cruel tyrant"; "a film with a solemn social message"
serious - concerned with work or important matters rather than play or trivialities; "a serious student of history"; "a serious attempt to learn to ski"; "gave me a serious look"; "a serious young man"; "are you serious or joking?"; "Don't be so serious!"

solemn

solemn

adjective
Full of or marked by dignity and seriousness:
Translations
رصين، جَدّيوَقور، مَهيب، إحْتِفالي
slavnostnívážný
højtidelig
ünnepélyes
alvörugefinnhátíîlegur
nopietnssvinīgs
resensvečan

solemn

[ˈsɒləm] ADJ [person, face] → serio, adusto; [warning] → serio; [occasion, promise] → solemne
he looked solemnestaba muy serio, tenía un aspecto adusto

solemn

[ˈsɒləm] adj
[person, face, voice] → solennel(le)
[promise, vow] → solennel(le)
[ceremony, ritual, occasion] → solennel(le)

solemn

adjfeierlich; face, mood, music also, person, plea, warningernst; architectureehrwürdig, erhaben; promise, duty, oathheilig; (= drab) colourtrist; in a solemn tonemit feierlicher Stimme; I give you my solemn wordich verspreche es hoch und heilig

solemn

[ˈsɒləm] adjsolenne

solemn

(ˈsoləm) adjective
1. serious and earnest. a solemn question; He looked very solemn as he announced the bad news.
2. stately; having formal dignity. a solemn procession.
ˈsolemnly adverb
ˈsolemnness noun
solemnity (səˈlemnəti) noun
the state of being solemn. the solemnity of the occasion.
References in classic literature ?
Jo went and sat on one arm of the chair, looking as if she thought they were about to join in some very solemn affair.
Leaving this busy scene, the four, with solemn faces, proceeded to the tent where it was hoped the map would be found.
Outside the circle of light in which she sat, the large dining-room looked solemn and shadowy.
The stranger regarded his interrogator a moment in wonder; and then, losing every mark of self-satisfaction in an expression of solemn humility, he answered:
The founder of this stately mansion--a gentleman noted for the square and ponderous courtesy of his demeanor, ought surely to have stood in his own hall, and to have offered the first welcome to so many eminent personages as here presented themselves in honor of his solemn festival.
Surveyor Pine, and from whose oral testimony he had made up his narrative, remembered her, in their youth, as a very old, but not decrepit woman, of a stately and solemn aspect.
And then rose up that solemn veiled figure, and drew aside the veil.
Well, trooping the colors is a very solemn ceremony, and everybody must stand uncovered when the flag goes by, the commandant and all; and once I was there, and ignorantly walked across right in front of the band, which was an awful disgrace: Ah, the Lieutenant-General was so ashamed, and so distressed that I should have done such a thing before all the world, that she couldn't keep the tears back; and then she taught me the salute, so that if I ever did any other unmilitary act through ignorance I could do my salute and she believed everybody would think it was apology enough and would not press the matter.
To me there was something unspeakably uncomfortable in the solemn dead silences that always followed this old person's tremendous outpourings of his feelings.
Then the people begun to flock in, and the beats and the girls took seats in the front row at the head of the coffin, and for a half an hour the people filed around slow, in single rank, and looked down at the dead man's face a minute, and some dropped in a tear, and it was all very still and solemn, only the girls and the beats holding handkerchiefs to their eyes and keep- ing their heads bent, and sobbing a little.
It is a solemn thought,--and the finest poem that was ever written came out of a grey pulpy mass such as we make brain sauce of.
The whole assembly wore an aspect of the most profound gravity; and in the faces of the knights might be perceived traces of military daring, united with the solemn carriage becoming men of a religious profession, and which, in the presence of their Grand Master, failed not to sit upon every brow.