sometimes


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some·times

 (sŭm′tīmz′)
adv.
1. At times; now and then.
2. Obsolete At some previous time; formerly.

sometimes

(ˈsʌmˌtaɪmz)
adv
1. now and then; from time to time; occasionally
2. obsolete formerly; sometime

some•times

(ˈsʌmˌtaɪmz)

adv.
on some occasions; at times.
[1520–30]

sometimes

sometime
1. 'sometimes'

You use sometimes to say that something happens on some occasions, rather than all the time.

The bus was sometimes completely full.
Sometimes I wish I was back in Africa.
2. 'sometime'

Don't confuse sometimes with sometime. Sometime means 'at a time in the past or future that is unknown or has not yet been decided'.

Can I come and see you sometime?

Sometime is often written as some time.

He died some time last year.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.sometimes - on certain occasions or in certain cases but not always; "sometimes she wished she were back in England"; "sometimes her photography is breathtaking"; "sometimes they come for a month; at other times for six months"

sometimes

sometimes

adverb
2. At times:
Translations
أحْياناأحْيَاناً
někdyobčas
nogle gange
vahel
joskus
कभी कभी
povremeno
néha
annaî veifiî, stundumstundum
時々
때때로
včasih
ibland
บางครั้งบางคราว
کبھی کبھی
thỉnh thoảng

sometimes

[ˈsʌmtaɪmz] ADVa veces
I sometimes drink beera veces bebo cerveza
sometimes I lose interesthay veces que pierdo el interés

sometimes

[ˈsʌmtaɪmz] advquelquefois, parfois
Sometimes I think she hates me → Quelquefois j'ai l'impression qu'elle me déteste.

sometimes

advmanchmal

sometimes

[ˈsʌmˌtaɪmz] advqualche volta, a volte

some

(sam) pronoun, adjective
1. an indefinite amount or number (of). I can see some people walking across the field; You'll need some money if you're going shopping; Some of the ink was spilt on the desk.
2. (said with emphasis) a certain, or small, amount or number (of). `Has she any experience of the work?' `Yes, she has some.'; Some people like the idea and some don't.
3. (said with emphasis) at least one / a few / a bit (of). Surely there are some people who agree with me?; I don't need much rest from work, but I must have some.
4. certain. He's quite kind in some ways.
adjective
1. a large, considerable or impressive (amount or number of). I spent some time trying to convince her; I'll have some problem sorting out these papers!
2. an unidentified or unnamed (thing, person etc). She was hunting for some book that she's lost.
3. (used with numbers) about; at a rough estimate. There were some thirty people at the reception.
adverb
(American) somewhat; to a certain extent. I think we've progressed some.
ˈsomebody pronoun
someone.
ˈsomeday adverb
(also some day) at an unknown time in the future. We'll manage it someday.
ˈsomehow adverb
in some way not known for certain. I'll get there somehow.
ˈsomeone pronoun
1. an unknown or unnamed person. There's someone at the door – would you answer it?; We all know someone who needs help.
2. a person of importance. He thinks he is someone.
ˈsomething pronoun
1. a thing not known or not stated. Would you like something to eat?; I've got something to tell you.
2. a thing of importance. There's something in what you say.
ˈsometime adverb
at an unknown time in the future or the past. We'll go there sometime next week; They went sometime last month.
ˈsometimes adverb
occasionally. He sometimes goes to America; He goes to America sometimes; Sometimes he seems very forgetful.
ˈsomewhat adverb
rather; a little. He is somewhat sad; The news puzzled me somewhat.
ˈsomewhere adverb
(American ˈsomeplace) (in or to) some place not known or not named. They live somewhere in London; I won't be at home tonight – I'm going somewhere for dinner.
mean something
to have meaning; to be significant. Do all these figures mean something?
or something
used when the speaker is uncertain or being vague. Her name is Mary or Margaret or something.
something like
1. about. We have something like five hundred people working here.
2. rather like. A zebra is something like a horse with stripes.
something tells me
I have reason to believe; I suspect. Something tells me she's lying.

sometimes

أحْيَاناً někdy nogle gange manchmal ενίοτε a veces joskus parfois povremeno talvolta 時々 때때로 soms av og til czasami às vezes иногда ibland บางครั้งบางคราว bazen thỉnh thoảng 有时候
References in classic literature ?
George Willard was the re- porter on the Winesburg Eagle and sometimes in the evenings he walked out along the highway to Wing Biddlebaum's house.
I used to love to drift along the pale-yellow cornfields, looking for the damp spots one sometimes found at their edges, where the smartweed soon turned a rich copper colour and the narrow brown leaves hung curled like cocoons about the swollen joints of the stem.
Her most intimate friend at school had been one of rather exceptional intellectual gifts, who wrote fine-sounding essays, which Edna admired and strove to imitate; and with her she talked and glowed over the English classics, and sometimes held religious and political controversies.
As ashore, the ladies often cause the most terrible duels among their rival admirers; just so with the whales, who sometimes come to deadly battle, and all for love.
Sometimes we had rather rough play, for they would frequently bite and kick as well as gallop.
Sometimes she smiled, saying nothing; sometimes she smiled when she uttered a name - such as Shekels, or BB, or Potter.
Sometimes spectators of these duels faint--and it does seem a very reasonable thing to do, too.
Living in a house and sleeping in a bed pulled on me pretty tight mostly, but before the cold weather I used to slide out and sleep in the woods sometimes, and so that was a rest to me.
Fortunately books were scarce, or the children might sometimes have gone ragged and hungry.
Sometimes the ambition of princes, who never think they have land or people enough to govern; sometimes the corruption of ministers, who engage their master in a war, in order to stifle or divert the clamour of the subjects against their evil administration.
But the reason why he wants sometimes to go off at a tangent may just be that he is predestined to make the road, and perhaps, too, that however stupid the "direct" practical man may be, the thought sometimes will occur to him that the road almost always does lead somewhere, and that the destination it leads to is less important than the process of making it, and that the chief thing is to save the well-conducted child from despising engineering, and so giving way to the fatal idleness, which, as we all know, is the mother of all the vices.
In such cases, people sometimes do stranger things than to act the magician, and awaken a young man to splendor who fell asleep in poverty.