somnambulistic


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to somnambulistic: somnambulism

som·nam·bu·lism

 (sŏm-năm′byə-lĭz′əm)
som·nam′bu·list n.
som·nam′bu·lis′tic adj.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Therefore, the tormented spirit that glared out of bodily eyes, when what seemed Ahab rushed from his room, was for the time but a vacated thing, a formless somnambulistic being, a ray of living light, to be sure, but without an object to color, and therefore a blankness in itself.
As she was unable to communicate with people, she lived in a sort of somnambulistic torpor.
Tess saw that continued mental distress had wrought him into that somnambulistic state now.
At the sound of his wife's voice he stopped and stared at her with a somnambulistic, expressionless gaze so long that Mrs Verloc moved her limbs slightly under the bed-clothes.
Whether this was an intentional and waking departure, or a somnambulistic leave-taking and walking in her sleep, may remain a subject of contention; but, on one point (and indeed the main one) all parties are agreed.
In an article on somnambulism, Eric Klaus explores Meyrink's later works, such as The Golem (1915), which Meyrink wrote at a time when he believed "salvation is realized only at the end of a process of awakening to higher knowledge, and this awakening is contingent upon escaping daily consciousness and entering a state of awareness akin to a somnambulistic state" (133).
In the meantime, from the other front, my mother took to rather somnambulistic navigation about the house at the night, although she wasn't asleep.
It is reported that on several occasions she went to her study in a somnambulistic state, made a light, and solved a problem she had left incomplete when awake.
In this context, Babbitt (1919: 88) reminded us of Anatole France's view of Villiers de l'Isle Adam's life as a somnambulistic, hypnotic dreamy journey whereby physical common and paltry reality (the paupers' quarters of cities) was transmuted into something unreal, wonderful, golden, dazzling (therefore, something very similar to the core architecture of an opium dream vision; see infra):
Populated by Jones's somnambulistic women, these tableaux re-create one's entry to a theater's box seats (loge in French).
UnderGlass is a show that yields to unflinching examination, with the works governed more by somnambulistic purge than by taste-driven purposefulness.
As far as the historical association between psi and hypnosis is concerned, it is true that many of the early classical mesmerists such as Puysegur, Elliotson, and Janet believed strongly in the occurrence of the "higher phenomena of mesmerism" (community of sensations and travelling clairvoyance) and they attributed these to the somnambulistic trance stage of hypnosis (Dingwall, 1967; Gauld, 1992).