sonata


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Related to sonata: sonata form, Zaleplon

so·na·ta

 (sə-nä′tə)
n.
A composition for one or more solo instruments, one of which is usually a keyboard instrument, usually consisting of three or four independent movements varying in key, mood, and tempo.

[Italian, from feminine past participle of sonare, to sound, from Latin sonāre; see swen- in Indo-European roots.]

sonata

(səˈnɑːtə)
n
1. (Classical Music) an instrumental composition, usually in three or more movements, for piano alone (piano sonata) or for any other instrument with or without piano accompaniment (violin sonata, cello sonata, etc). See also sonata form, symphony1, concerto1
2. (Classical Music) a one-movement keyboard composition of the baroque period
[C17: from Italian, from sonare to sound, from Latin]

so•na•ta

(səˈnɑ tə)

n., pl. -tas.
a musical composition for solo instrument or a small number of instruments typically in three or four movements in contrasting forms and keys.
[1685–95; < Italian, feminine past participle of sonare < Latin sonāre to sound1; see -ate1]

sonata

An instrumental work in three or four movements for soloist or with piano accompaniment.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sonata - a musical composition of 3 or 4 movements of contrasting formssonata - a musical composition of 3 or 4 movements of contrasting forms
classical, classical music, serious music - traditional genre of music conforming to an established form and appealing to critical interest and developed musical taste
piano sonata - a sonata for piano
sonatina - a short and simple sonata
symphonic music, symphony - a long and complex sonata for symphony orchestra
movement - a major self-contained part of a symphony or sonata; "the second movement is slow and melodic"
Translations
sonaatti
szonáta
sónata
sonată

sonata

[səˈnɑːtə] Nsonata f

sonata

[səˈnɑːtə] nsonate f

sonata

nSonate f

sonata

[səˈnɑːtə] nsonata
References in classic literature ?
The Sonata that His Highness plays so charmingly," said the Vice-Warden.
All this time the Sonata was pealing through the room.
From the far side of the house through the closed doors came the sound of difficult passages- twenty times repeated- of a sonata by Dussek.
They went up to the door of the sitting room from which came the sound of the oft-repeated passage of the sonata.
Why do you allow these two barbarous men to keep you here while the great Bootmann is playing the Nightmare Sonata in the next room?
The great Bootmann had arrived at that part of the Nightmare Sonata in which musical sound, produced principally with the left hand, is made to describe, beyond all possibility of mistake, the rising of the moon in a country church-yard and a dance of Vampires round a maiden's grave.
As very soon she had played the only pieces of dance music she could remember, she went on to play an air from a sonata by Mozart.
But that some sonatas of Beethoven are written tragic no one can gainsay; yet they can triumph or despair as the player decides, and Lucy had decided that they should triumph.
What causes them to labour at pianoforte sonatas, and to learn four songs from a fashionable master at a guinea a lesson, and to play the harp if they have handsome arms and neat elbows, and to wear Lincoln Green toxophilite hats and feathers, but that they may bring down some "desirable" young man with those killing bows and arrows of theirs?
She trifled away half an hour at the piano; and played, in that time, selections from the Songs of Mendelssohn, the Mazurkas of Chopin, the Operas of Verdi, and the Sonatas of Mozart -- all of whom had combined together on this occasion and produced one immortal work, entitled "Frank.
Nobody but an acrobat will voluntarily spend years at such a difficult mechanical puzzle as the keyboard, and so we have to take our impressions of Beethoven's sonatas from acrobats who vie with each other in the rapidity of their prestos, or the staying power of their left wrists.
It was only at moments like these--or when he and his wife were playing Sonatas in the modest little music-room at Swanhaven--that Lord Holchester's eldest son was really happy.