sonority


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so·nor·i·ty

 (sə-nôr′ĭ-tē, -nŏr′-)
n. pl. so·nor·i·ties
1. The quality or state of being sonorous; resonance.
2. A sound.
3. Linguistics The degree to which a speech sound is like a vowel. Plosives have the least sonority and vowels have the most.

so•nor•i•ty

(səˈnɔr ɪ ti, -ˈnɒr-)

n., pl. -ties.
the condition or quality of being resonant or sonorous.
[1515–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sonority - having the character of a loud deep sound; the quality of being resonant
timbre, tone, quality, timber - (music) the distinctive property of a complex sound (a voice or noise or musical sound); "the timbre of her soprano was rich and lovely"; "the muffled tones of the broken bell summoned them to meet"
Translations

sonority

[səˈnɒrɪtɪ] Nsonoridad f

sonority

nKlangfülle f

sonority

[səˈnɒrɪtɪ] n (frm) → sonorità f inv
References in classic literature ?
He pronounced his words with great distinctness and sonority, and Newman assured him that his way of dealing with the French tongue was very superior to the bewildering chatter that he heard in other mouths.
The choir brought all its gifts of pizzicatoclear diction, a unanimity secured by exemplary attention to the conductor, confident sonority and well-shaped attack to this deeply-felt piece.
What is not depicted or cannot be portrayed visually are complemented or counterpointed by splendid sonority.
He illustrated that sonority-driven reduction targets vowels with respect to their sonority class.
It anchored Berger's recent exploration of sonority in music that's familiar but also, itself, visionary: Bach's aching melodic line somehow never fails to sound anything but fresh and contemporary.
As Kelly notes, the aim of this book "is to identify and trace the evolution of sonority as a distinctive French modernist strand, seeing it as a central, enduring and consistent preoccupation in French musical traditions from Debussy's generation onwards, which was subjected to transformation in the 1920s and 1930s" (pp.
As God's people, it remains our privilege and responsibility to enrich that sonority by our faithful response to the news of God's salvific love.
Indeed, the piece is evocative, and the pairing of bassoon and horn, a wonderful combined sonority too often neglected by composers in chamber music contexts, works beautifully in this new work.
Many linguists invoke sonority to explain various characteristics of language, but others doubt the adequacy of formal accounts based on sonority, or even question its existence at all.
Their music has a unique sonority which I believe will astound everyone.
sonority goes up from the onset to the nucleus (the peak in sonority) and then down to the coda showing that the syllable ends there.
You cannot produce a beautiful sonority or combination of sonorities without first hearing the imagined sound in the inner ear.