soothe


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soothe

 (so͞oth)
v. soothed, sooth·ing, soothes
v.tr.
1. To calm or placate (a person, for example).
2. To ease or relieve (pain, for example).
v.intr.
To bring comfort, composure, or relief.

[Middle English sothen, to verify, from Old English sōthian, from sōth, true; see es- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

sooth′er n.

soothe

(suːð)
vb
1. (tr) to make calm or tranquil
2. (tr) to relieve or assuage (pain, longing, etc)
3. (intr) to bring tranquillity or relief
[C16 (in the sense: to mollify): from Old English sōthian to prove; related to Old Norse sanna to assert; see sooth]
ˈsoother n

soothe

(suð)

v. soothed, sooth•ing. v.t.
1. to offer relief or comfort to: to soothe someone with kind words.
2. to mitigate; assuage; allay: to soothe sunburned skin.
v.i.
3. to exert a soothing influence.
[before 950; Middle English sothen to verify, Old English sōthian, derivative of sōth sooth]
sooth′er, n.
syn: See comfort.
sooth, soothsayer, soothe - Sooth, "true, truth," or "that which is," is part of soothsayer; it is related to soothe, which once meant "assent to be true; say yes to," or "to prove or show a fact to be true."
See also related terms for prove.

soothe


Past participle: soothed
Gerund: soothing

Imperative
soothe
soothe
Present
I soothe
you soothe
he/she/it soothes
we soothe
you soothe
they soothe
Preterite
I soothed
you soothed
he/she/it soothed
we soothed
you soothed
they soothed
Present Continuous
I am soothing
you are soothing
he/she/it is soothing
we are soothing
you are soothing
they are soothing
Present Perfect
I have soothed
you have soothed
he/she/it has soothed
we have soothed
you have soothed
they have soothed
Past Continuous
I was soothing
you were soothing
he/she/it was soothing
we were soothing
you were soothing
they were soothing
Past Perfect
I had soothed
you had soothed
he/she/it had soothed
we had soothed
you had soothed
they had soothed
Future
I will soothe
you will soothe
he/she/it will soothe
we will soothe
you will soothe
they will soothe
Future Perfect
I will have soothed
you will have soothed
he/she/it will have soothed
we will have soothed
you will have soothed
they will have soothed
Future Continuous
I will be soothing
you will be soothing
he/she/it will be soothing
we will be soothing
you will be soothing
they will be soothing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been soothing
you have been soothing
he/she/it has been soothing
we have been soothing
you have been soothing
they have been soothing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been soothing
you will have been soothing
he/she/it will have been soothing
we will have been soothing
you will have been soothing
they will have been soothing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been soothing
you had been soothing
he/she/it had been soothing
we had been soothing
you had been soothing
they had been soothing
Conditional
I would soothe
you would soothe
he/she/it would soothe
we would soothe
you would soothe
they would soothe
Past Conditional
I would have soothed
you would have soothed
he/she/it would have soothed
we would have soothed
you would have soothed
they would have soothed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.soothe - give moral or emotional strength to
calm, still, tranquilize, tranquillise, tranquillize, calm down, quiet, quieten, lull - make calm or still; "quiet the dragons of worry and fear"
allay, still, ease, relieve - lessen the intensity of or calm; "The news eased my conscience"; "still the fears"
2.soothe - cause to feel better; "the medicine soothes the pain of the inflammation"
alleviate, relieve, palliate, assuage - provide physical relief, as from pain; "This pill will relieve your headaches"
irritate - excite to an abnormal condition, or chafe or inflame; "Aspirin irritates my stomach"

soothe

verb
1. calm, still, quiet, hush, settle, calm down, appease, lull, mitigate, pacify, mollify, smooth down, tranquillize He would take her in his arms and soothe her.
calm worry, excite, upset, disturb, annoy, irritate, rouse, hassle (informal), aggravate (informal), agitate, inflame, disquiet, vex, get on your nerves (informal)
2. relieve, ease, alleviate, dull, diminish, soften, assuage, deaden, take the edge off Lemon tisanes with honey can soothe sore throats.
relieve irritate, exacerbate, increase, stimulate, inflame

soothe

verb
1. To ease the anger or agitation of:
2. To give hope to in time of grief or pain:
Translations
يُخَفِّف الألَميُهَدِّئ
ukonejšitulevit
beroligedulme
lina, sefaróa, sefa
mierinātnomierinātremdēt
pomiriti
dindirmekyatıştırmak

soothe

[suːð]
A. VT [+ person, baby] → calmar, tranquilizar; [+ nerves] → calmar; [+ mind] → relajar; [+ anger] → aplacar; [+ doubts] → acallar; [+ pain, cough] → aliviar
to soothe sb's fearsdisipar los temores de algn, tranquilizar a algn
to soothe sb's vanityhalagar la vanidad a algn
B. VIaliviar

soothe

[ˈsuːð] vt
(= calm) [+ person] → apaiser; [+ nerves] → calmer; [+ fear] → apaiser
(= ease) [+ pain, aching muscles, burn] → apaiser

soothe

vtberuhigen; painlindern, mildern
viberuhigen; (= relieve pain)lindern; an ointment which sootheseine schmerzlindernde Salbe

soothe

[suːð] vt (gen) → calmare; (pain, anxieties) → alleviare

soothe

(suːð) verb
1. to calm, comfort or quieten (a person, his feelings etc). She was so upset that it took half an hour to soothe her.
2. to ease (pain etc). The medicine soothed the child's toothache.
ˈsoothing adjective
ˈsoothingly adverb

soothe

vt. calmar, aliviar, mitigar; suavizar.

soothe

vt aliviar, calmar
References in classic literature ?
That comes of having big blue eyes and loving music," said Jo, trying to soothe Beth, who trembled and looked more excited than she had ever been before.
Phoebe's voice had always a pretty music in it, and could either enliven Clifford by its sparkle and gayety of tone, or soothe him by a continued flow of pebbly and brook-like cadences.
The case, I may mention, was that of an apparition in just such an old house as had gathered us for the occasion-- an appearance, of a dreadful kind, to a little boy sleeping in the room with his mother and waking her up in the terror of it; waking her not to dissipate his dread and soothe him to sleep again, but to encounter also, herself, before she had succeeded in doing so, the same sight that had shaken him.
He looked more like his father every hour, Elzbieta would say, and said it many times a day, because she saw that it pleased Jurgis; the poor little terror-stricken woman was planning all day and all night to soothe the prisoned giant who was intrusted to her care.
This little chap had lived in my arms a good part of its small life, and often I could soothe away its troubles and get it to laugh through the tear-dews on its eye- lashes when even its mother couldn't.
Said Benny appeared to know just when to try to soothe him and when to leave him alone.
Aunt Jane, never demonstrative, cried with Rebecca as she attempted to soothe her.
He had come, in his anxiety to see how she bore Frank Churchill's engagement, with no selfish view, no view at all, but of endeavouring, if she allowed him an opening, to soothe or to counsel her.
Marianne's feelings had then broken in, and put an end to all regularity of detail; and for some time all that could be done was to soothe her distress, lessen her alarms, and combat her resentment.
This state of things should have been to me a paradise of peace, accustomed as I was to a life of ceaseless reprimand and thankless fagging; but, in fact, my racked nerves were now in such a state that no calm could soothe, and no pleasure excite them agreeably.
WE had sad work with little Cathy that day: she rose in high glee, eager to join her cousin, and such passionate tears and lamentations followed the news of his departure that Edgar himself was obliged to soothe her, by affirming he should come back soon: he added, however, 'if I can get him'; and there were no hopes of that.
I was so shocked by the contents of this heart-rending letter, that I ran off directly towards the little hotel with the intention of taking it on my way to Doctor Strong's, and trying to soothe Mr.