sophist


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Related to sophist: Socrates, Plato, Protagoras

soph·ist

 (sŏf′ĭst)
n.
1.
a. One skilled in elaborate and devious argumentation.
b. A scholar or thinker.
2. Sophist Any of a group of professional fifth-century bc Greek philosophers and teachers who speculated on theology, metaphysics, and the sciences, and who were later characterized by Plato as superficial manipulators of rhetoric and dialectic.

[Middle English sophiste, from Latin sophista, from Greek sophistēs, from sophizesthai, to become wise, from sophos, clever.]

sophist

(ˈsɒfɪst)
n
1. (Philosophy) (often capital) one of the pre-Socratic philosophers who were itinerant professional teachers of oratory and argument and who were prepared to enter into debate on any matter however specious
2. a person who uses clever or quibbling arguments that are fundamentally unsound
[C16: from Latin sophista, from Greek sophistēs a wise man, from sophizesthai to act craftily]

soph•ist

(ˈsɒf ɪst)

n.
1. (often cap.) any of a class of ancient Greek teachers of philosophy, rhetoric, etc., noted esp. for their ingenuity and speciousness in argumentation.
2. a person who reasons adroitly and speciously.
[1535–45; < Latin sophista < Greek sophistḗs sage]

sophist

1. Ancient Greece. a teacher of rhetoric, philosophy, etc.; hence, a learned person.
2. one who is given to the specious arguments often used by the sophists.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
1. Ancient Greece. a teacher of rhetoric, philosophy, etc; hence, a learned person.
2. one who is given to the specious arguments often used by the sophists.
See also: Argumentation
1. Ancient Greece. a teacher of rhetoric, philosophy, etc.; hence, a learned person.
2. one who is given to the specious arguments often used by the sophists. — sophistic, sophistical, adj.
See also: Learning
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Switch to new thesaurus
Noun1.Sophist - any of a group of Greek philosophers and teachers in the 5th century BC who speculated on a wide range of subjects
philosopher - a specialist in philosophy
2.sophist - someone whose reasoning is subtle and often specious
ratiocinator, reasoner - someone who reasons logically
Translations

sophist

[ˈsɒfɪst] Nsofista mf

sophist

nSophist(in) m(f)
References in classic literature ?
With his accusers he will only fence and play, as he had fenced with other 'improvers of youth,' answering the Sophist according to his sophistry all his life long.
In the representations of the Comic poets, and in the opinion of the multitude, he had been identified with the teachers of physical science and with the Sophists.
Such too is the discovery made by Iphigenia in the play of Polyidus the Sophist.
When the sophist would supplant, with the wild theories of his worldly wisdom, the positive mandates of inspiration, let him remember the expansion of his own feeble intellects, and pause—let him feel the wisdom of God in what is partially concealed.
This curious work dates in its present form from the lifetime or shortly after the death of Hadrian, but seems to be based in part on an earlier version by the sophist Alcidamas (c.
He may be regarded as standing in the same relation to Gorgias as Hippocrates in the Protagoras to the other great Sophist.
He is asked 'whether Meno shall go to the Sophists and be taught.
Socrates returns to the consideration of the question 'whether virtue is teachable,' which was denied on the ground that there are no teachers of it: (for the Sophists are bad teachers, and the rest of the world do not profess to teach).
The teaching of the Sophists is confessedly inadequate, and Meno, who is their pupil, is ignorant of the very nature of general terms.
He recognizes the lower form of right opinion, as well as the higher one of science, in the spirit of one who desires to include in his philosophy every aspect of human life; just as he recognizes the existence of popular opinion as a fact, and the Sophists as the expression of it.
In a passage of the Republic (492 b) Plato repudiates the notion that the sophists have a corrupting moral influence upon young men.
that of the later Sophists, a Grecian sect of philosophers who began