sophister


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Related to sophister: sophistry

sophister

(ˈsɒfɪstə)
n
1. (Education) (esp formerly) a second-year undergraduate at certain British universities
2. (Philosophy) a rare variant of sophist
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Pilgrimage to Pernassus, and the returne from Pernassus, have stood the honest Stagekeepers in many a Crownes expence for linckes and vizardes: purchas'd many a Sophister a knock with a clubbe, hindred the buttlers boxe, and emptied the Colledge barrells.
in greater matters (52): Brome, The Novella (1632); Zouche, The Sophister (1614); Anon.
In Francis Coventry's children's book The History of Pompey the Little (1751), young Lady Sophister tells Dr Rhubarb that Locke is her favourite philosopher, h was said of William Warburton that he had Locke's works 'bound up in small detached pieces, for the convenience of carrying them with him'.
David Wachman is having by far his best season and he was on the mark yet again, this time with Sophister in the Cavan GAA Supporters Club Dublin Handicap while Johnny Murtagh brought Tony Martin's Rick late to take the Ballybin Handicap.
Kinane drew level with Johnny Murtagh in the title race when completing a double with another all-the-way win on Sophister, his 29th winner of the season, in the seven- furlong three-year-old handicap.
This colt caught the eye on his debut in a Curragh maiden and was unlucky in running when a fast-finishing neck second to Sophister in a seven-furlong maiden at Cork on Easter Monday.
they call'd the old Sophister, who was as sparing of his words as his daughters had bin, and no, or none, was the reply's hee made us to our demands.
MICK KINANE, who rode Osterhase, gained a degree of consolation by returning to the winners' enclosure with Sophister in the median auction maiden.
Wanting to ensure fairness in the selection process, he turned the responsibility over to the students and later noted that "Officers of the Sophisters chose a Valedictorian.
That of sophisters, oeconomists, and calculators, has succeeded; and the glory of Europe is extinguished for ever.
Was modernity, that "age of sophisters, economists, and calculators," born as Burke thought with the storming of Versailles in October of 1789?
That of sophisters, economists, and calculators, has succeeded; and the glory of Europe is extinguished for ever.