sophistry


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

soph·is·try

 (sŏf′ĭ-strē)
n. pl. soph·is·tries
1. Plausible but fallacious argumentation.
2. A plausible but misleading or fallacious argument.

sophistry

(ˈsɒfɪstrɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Philosophy)
a. a method of argument that is seemingly plausible though actually invalid and misleading
b. the art of using such arguments
2. subtle but unsound or fallacious reasoning
3. an instance of this; sophism

soph•ist•ry

(ˈsɒf ə stri)

n., pl. -ries.
1. a subtle, tricky, superficially plausible, but generally fallacious method of reasoning.
2. a false argument; sophism.
[1300–50]

sophistry

1. the teachings and ways of teaching of the ancient Greek sophists.
2. subtle, superficially plausible, but actually specious or fallacious reasoning, as was sometimes used by the sophists.
See also: Philosophy
1. the teachings and ways of teaching of the Greek sophists.
2. specious or fallacious reasoning, as was sometimes used by the sophists.
See also: Argumentation, Learning, Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sophistry - a deliberately invalid argument displaying ingenuity in reasoning in the hope of deceiving someone
fallacy, false belief - a misconception resulting from incorrect reasoning

sophistry

noun fallacy, quibble, casuistry, sophism, specious reasoning a triumph of sophistry

sophistry

noun
Plausible but invalid reasoning:
Translations

sophistry

[ˈsɒfɪstrɪ] Nsofistería f
a sophistryun sofisma

sophistry

nSophisterei f

sophistry

[ˈsəʊfɪstrɪ] n (frm) → sofisma m
References in classic literature ?
And hence bitter enmities had arisen; the professors of knowledge had revenged themselves by calling him a villainous corrupter of youth, and by repeating the commonplaces about atheism and materialism and sophistry, which are the stock-accusations against all philosophers when there is nothing else to be said of them.
Also there is a touch of irony in them, which takes them out of the category of sophistry.
Yes, there's something of a sophistry about that," Veslovsky agreed.
Yet he knew that such consolation was the merest sophistry.
Can any temptation have sophistry and delusion strong enough to persuade you to so simple a bargain?
If the road over which you will still have to pass should in some places appear to you tedious or irksome, you will recollect that you are in quest of information on a subject the most momentous which can engage the attention of a free people, that the field through which you have to travel is in itself spacious, and that the difficulties of the journey have been unnecessarily increased by the mazes with which sophistry has beset the way.
By means of this sophistry Sancho was made to endure hunger, and hunger so keen that in his heart he cursed the government, and even him who had given it to him; however, with his hunger and his conserve he undertook to deliver judgments that day, and the first thing that came before him was a question that was submitted to him by a stranger, in the presence of the majordomo and the other attendants, and it was in these words: "Senor, a large river separated two districts of one and the same lordship- will your worship please to pay attention, for the case is an important and a rather knotty one?
Have done with your sophistry," said Sir Guy impatiently.
Dyott as if in compassion for sophistry so simple, "adventures are just adventures.
To be quite candid I did not attempt to delude myself with any such sophistry, since I knew well that upon war-like Mars there are few cowards, and that every man, whether prince, priest, or peasant, glories in deadly strife.
With that he took Mrs Varden's hand again, and having pressed it to his lips with the highflown gallantry of the day--a little burlesqued to render it the more striking in the good lady's unaccustomed eyes--proceeded in the same strain of mingled sophistry, cajolery, and flattery, to entreat that her utmost influence might be exerted to restrain her husband and daughter from any further promotion of Edward's suit to Miss Haredale, and from aiding or abetting either party in any way.
Bar could not at once return to his inveiglements of the most enlightened and remarkable jury he had ever seen in that box, with whom, he could tell his learned friend, no shallow sophistry would go down, and no unhappily abused professional tact and skill prevail (this was the way he meant to begin with them); so he said he would go too, and would loiter to and fro near the house while his friend was inside.