sordid


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sor·did

 (sôr′dĭd)
adj.
1. Morally degraded: "The sordid details of his orgies stank under his very nostrils" (James Joyce). See Synonyms at base2.
2.
a. Dirty or filthy: sordid clothing.
b. Squalid or wretched: a sordid tenement.

[Middle English sordide, festering, purulent, from Latin sordidus, dirty, from sordēre, to be dirty.]

sor′did·ly adv.
sor′did·ness n.

sordid

(ˈsɔːdɪd)
adj
1. dirty, foul, or squalid
2. degraded; vile; base: a sordid affair.
3. selfish and grasping: sordid avarice.
[C16: from Latin sordidus, from sordēre to be dirty]
ˈsordidly adv
ˈsordidness n

sor•did

(ˈsɔr dɪd)

adj.
1. morally ignoble or base; vile.
2. meanly selfish or mercenary.
3. filthy; squalid.
[1590–1600; < Latin sordidus=sord(ēs) dirt + -idus -id4]
sor′did•ly, adv.
sor′did•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.sordid - morally degraded; "a seedy district"; "the seamy side of life"; "sleazy characters hanging around casinos"; "sleazy storefronts with...dirt on the walls"- Seattle Weekly; "the sordid details of his orgies stank under his very nostrils"- James Joyce; "the squalid atmosphere of intrigue and betrayal"
disreputable - lacking respectability in character or behavior or appearance
2.sordid - unethical or dishonest; "dirty police officers"; "a sordid political campaign"
corrupt - lacking in integrity; "humanity they knew to be corrupt...from the day of Adam's creation"; "a corrupt and incompetent city government"
3.sordid - foul and run-down and repulsive; "a flyblown bar on the edge of town"; "a squalid overcrowded apartment in the poorest part of town"; "squalid living conditions"; "sordid shantytowns"
dirty, soiled, unclean - soiled or likely to soil with dirt or grime; "dirty unswept sidewalks"; "a child in dirty overalls"; "dirty slums"; "piles of dirty dishes"; "put his dirty feet on the clean sheet"; "wore an unclean shirt"; "mining is a dirty job"; "Cinderella did the dirty work while her sisters preened themselves"
4.sordid - meanly avaricious and mercenary; "sordid avarice"; "sordid material interests"
acquisitive - eager to acquire and possess things especially material possessions or ideas; "an acquisitive mind"; "an acquisitive society in which the craving for material things seems never satisfied"

sordid

adjective
1. base, degraded, shameful, low, vicious, shabby, vile, degenerate, despicable, disreputable, debauched He put his head in his hands as his sordid life was exposed.
base pure, decent, noble, upright, honourable, blameless
2. dirty, seedy, sleazy, squalid, mean, foul, filthy, unclean, wretched, seamy, slovenly, skanky (slang), slummy, scungy (Austral. & N.Z.) the attic windows of their sordid little rooms
dirty clean, spotless, fresh, pure, squeaky-clean, unblemished, unsullied, undefiled

sordid

adjective
Having or proceeding from low moral standards:
Translations
خَسيس، دنيءقَذِر
nečestnýnechutnýšpinavý
beskidtussel
anyagiashitványkapzsiközönségespiszkos
óhreinn, niîurníddurósiîlegur, óòverralegur
netīrsnožēlojamszemisks

sordid

[ˈsɔːdɪd] ADJ [place, room etc] → miserable, sórdido; [deal, motive etc] → mezquino
it's a pretty sordid businesses un asunto de lo más desagradable

sordid

[ˈsɔːrdɪd] adj
[behaviour, motive, life, affair, details] → sordide
[room, street, conditions] → sordide

sordid

adjeklig; place, room alsoverkommen, heruntergekommen; motiveschmutzig, niedrig, gemein; conditions, life, storyelend, erbärmlich; crimegemein; affairschmutzig; he considers it sordid to discuss moneyer hält es für unfein, über Geld zu sprechen; spare me the sordid detailserspar mir die schmutzigen Einzelheiten

sordid

[ˈsɔːdɪd] adj (place, room) → sordido/a; (deal, motive) → meschino/a, sordido/a

sordid

(ˈsoːdid) adjective
1. (of a place etc) dirty, mean and poor. a very sordid neighbourhood.
2. (of a person's behaviour etc) showing low standards or ideals etc; not very pleasant or admirable. The whole affair was rather sordid.
ˈsordidly adverb
ˈsordidness noun
References in classic literature ?
It reminded him of the Sicilians he had seen in London in their little sordid tragedies.
So--with many a cold, deep heart-quake at the idea of at last coming into sordid contact with the world, from which she had so long kept aloof, while every added day of seclusion had rolled another stone against the cavern door of her hermitage--the poor thing bethought herself of the ancient shop-window, the rusty scales, and dusty till.
I reflected acutely that the sense of such differences, such superiorities of quality, always, on the part of the majority--which could include even stupid, sordid headmasters-- turn infallibly to the vindictive.
The gallant Perseus, a son of Jupiter, was the first whaleman; and to the eternal honor of our calling be it said, that the first whale attacked by our brotherhood was not killed with any sordid intent.
All the sordid suggestions of the place were gone--in the twilight it was a vision of power.
The more hopelessly sordid and insensible he appeared, the greater became Mrs.
It is the sordid cares of the lowly born that do these things.
not a mean spirit, nor a sordid soul, nor a sad heart there - ah, Thorndike, I wish I could see it again.
In this sordid place, and clothed, bedded, and fed like a pauper, this strange princess lived and worshiped during two years, and in it she died.
It's a sordid, selfish world, and I wish I was out of it.
Hovering on the verge of the great beyond,--her body "struck" and no longer under control of her iron will,--no divine visions floated across her tired brain; nothing but petty cares and sordid anxieties.
Amidst this sordid scene, sat a man with his clenched hands resting on his knees, and his eyes bent on the ground.