sorted


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Related to sorted: sorted out

sort

 (sôrt)
n.
1. A group of persons or things of the same general character; a kind. See Usage Note at kind2.
2. Character or nature: books of a subversive sort.
3. One that exemplifies the characteristics of or serves a similar function to another: "A large dinner-party ... made a sort of general introduction for her to the society of the neighbourhood" (George Eliot).
4. A person; an individual: The clerk is a decent sort.
5. Computers An operation that arranges data in a specified way: did an alphabetic sort on the columns of data.
6. Archaic A way of acting or behaving: "in this sort the simple household lived / From day to day" (William Wordsworth).
v. sort·ed, sort·ing, sorts
v.tr.
1. To place or arrange according to class, kind, or size; classify: sorted the books into boxes by genre. See Synonyms at arrange.
2. To separate from others: sort the wheat from the chaff.
v.intr.
1. To make a search or examination of a collection of things: sorted through the laundry looking for a matching sock.
2. To be or become arranged in a certain way.
Phrasal Verb:
sort out
1. To separate from others: sorted out the books to be donated to the library.
2. To clarify or resolve: She tried to sort out her problems.
3. To bring or restore to health or good condition: A good night's sleep will sort you out.
4. To reprimand or punish (someone) for a mistake or offense.
Idioms:
after a sort
In a haphazard or imperfect way: managed to paint the chair after a sort.
of sorts/a sort
1. Of a mediocre or inferior kind: a constitutional government of a sort.
2. Of one kind or another: knew many folktales of sorts.
out of sorts
1. Slightly ill.
2. Irritable; cross: The teacher is out of sorts this morning.
sort of Informal
Somewhat; rather: "Gambling and prostitution ... have been prohibited, but only sort of" (George F. Will).

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin sors, sort-, lot; see ser- in Indo-European roots.]

sort′a·ble adj.
sort′er n.

sorted

(ˈsɔːtɪd)
interj
an exclamation of satisfaction, approval, etc
adj
(Recreational Drugs) possessing the desired recreational drugs
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.sorted - arranged according to size
sized - having a specified size
2.sorted - arranged into groups
classified - arranged into classes
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Burden,' he continued, as he sorted and tried his chisels, `was for a fellow in the Black Tiger Mine, up above Silverton, Colorado.
He had not the placid, quiet, unworldly air of Simeon Halliday; on the contrary, a particularly wide-awake and au fait appearance, like a man who rather prides himself on knowing what he is about, and keeping a bright lookout ahead; peculiarities which sorted rather oddly with his broad brim and formal phraseology.
We got a splendid stock of sorted spiders, and bugs, and frogs, and caterpillars, and one thing or another; and we like to got a hornet's nest, but we didn't.
I suppose, Miss Temple, the thread I bought at Lowton will do; it struck me that it would be just of the quality for the calico chemises, and I sorted the needles to match.
Captain Wragge watched the postmaster's hands, as they sorted the letters in the box, with breathless eagerness.
Such was thir song, While the Creator calling forth by name His mightie Angels gave them several charge, As sorted best with present things.
But I'll go as far with you as I dare go, and a step beyond, for I'll have my wig sorted by the captain or I'm mistaken
But that's the way; folks mun allays choose by contrairies, as if they must be sorted like the pork--a bit o' good meat wi' a bit o' offal.
After that we had a few minutes of silence, while I sorted out the pebbles, and amused myself with watching Bruno's plan of gardening.
This talisman opened all doors, even those in the despatching-caisson at the foot of the tower, where they were delivering the sorted Continental mail.
He sorted out every scrap of manuscript, every map, and the native letters.
Tacitus saith, Livia sorted well with the arts of her husband, and dissimulation of her son; attributing arts or policy to Augustus, and dissimulation to Tiberius.